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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townofwilmington1981wilm 




1458 



IN ME MORI AM 



Ernest M. Crisp o 
Jmnes S. Fair iveat her 
Kenneth L. Fcyler 
Arthur V. Lynch, Sr. 
Joseph R. Lynch 
Howard (Chuck) Moorman 
Kenneth H. Wilson 



Cover picture: 



Butters Roiv Water Treatment Plant 
Weston and Sampson, Design Engineers^ 



Table of Contents 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 71 

Board of Appeals 41 

Board of Assessors 14 

Board of Health 37 

Board of Registrars 18 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 7 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund , 40 

Cemetery Department 24 

Conservation Commission 34 

Constable 18 

Council for the Arts 53 

Council on Aging 51 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 13 

Fire Department 25 

Highway Department 20 

Historical Commission 37 

Housing Authority 35 

Housing Rehabilitation Program 66 

Inspector of Buildings , ... 19 

Library Director 16 

Library Trustees 15 

Planning Board 29 

Police Department 21 

Public Buildings Department 28 

Recreation Commission 67 

Redevelopment Authority 52 

Revenue Sharing 112 

School Committee 54 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 50 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 63 

Superintendent of Schools 57 

Town Accountant 109 

Town Clerk 12 

Town Collector 10 

Town Counsel 31 

Town Engineer 23 

Town Manager 4 

Town Meetings Annual Town Election - April 18, 1981 76 

Annual Town Meeting - April 25, 1981 78 

Special Town Meeting - May 18, 1981 90 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - June 13, 1981 92 

Special Town Meeting - September 14, 1981 102 

Town Treasurer 11 

Tree Department 30 

Veterans' Services 40 

Water & Sewer Department 26 



1 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

1981 was a year of controversy, change, and growth for the Town of Wilmington. 
The controversies that we faced were: Proposition 2^5 and budget cuts, local 
aid, elderly and scattered-site family housing, arcades, and flammable permits. 
The public's reaction to issues made us aware_ of the delicacy of the public 
trust. Every concern we were faced with had its pros and cons. Long hours of 
debate and discussion gave us the direction to best guide the Town. 

For example, the dictates of Proposition 2^ caused the Town to cut $1.5 million 
from the tax levy and the result was a $13.50 drop in the tax rate from $80.50 
to $67.00. This price was paid for by budget cuts in all departments. On the 
other hand, the average homeowner felt the real impact of this tax cutting mea- 
sure by a $300 drop in their FY-1982 tax bill. 

In January, 1981, the Department of Housing and Urban Development returned the 
Town's application for a continuation of our successful housing rehabilitation 
program. Their reason for HUD's action was the allegation that the Town was 
not meeting its housing assistance needs. 

We conducted numerous public hearings to obtain your views on many subjects in- 
cluding: arcades and flammable permits. Some of these hearings filled the Town 
Kali with citizens exercising their right of freedom of speech. You came to be 
heard and you were. 

The changes that affected the Board were several. Town Manager Sterling C. Morris 
retired on June 30, 1981, after fourteen years of faithful service to the Town. 
The Assistant Town Manager was appo;Lnted the new Town Manager. In August 
Selectman Aldo A. Caira was elected the National President of the Order of Sons 
of Italy in America. The Board voted to fill his vacancy with his son Michael A. 
Caira, a former selectman. Later in the fall we were informed that Wilmington 
will be redistricted from the 5th Massachusetts Congressional District to the 7th. 
This will change our congressman from James M. Shannon to Edward J. Markey. 

Wilmington's growth was noted in the addition of several new industrial and com- 
mercial buildings: Honeywell's optical facility on Fordham Road, Digital's 
200,000 sq. ft. plant on Ballardvale Street, Reading Savings Bank bright, new of- 
fice on Main Street, and the opening of the Quinn Building, formerly Reading 
Savings Bank. We are pleased to welcome these businesses to Town. 

The Town's Water and Sewer Commissioners celebrated the opening of their new 
water treatment plant in October. This made the local TV news because the 
plant is the first one in New England to remove TCE from the water supply. 

As we approach the 1982 Annual Town Meeting, we will be faced with a most dif- 
ficult decision, which is "How will we approach the second year of Proposition 
2*5?" In arriving at this decision we should not lose sight of the fact that the 
municipality has valuable services to provide to the community. 



2 



As your Board of Selectmen we are aware of the problems that face the Town, and 
we will continue to provide the leadership to solve them in a businesslike manner. 



Respectfully submitted, 

A. ^hn Imbimbo, Chairman 
Rocco V. DePasquale 
Robert J. Cain 
Daniel H. Ballou 
Michael A. Caira 




TowrV OF WlLMINGXOlV 



MASSACHUSETTS 01687 

OFFICE OF THE 

TOWN MANAGER COa€ 617 

esa-J3ii 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

It is a pleasure to present the Town of Wilmington's 1981 Annual Report. This is the 
thirtieth such report to be presented by a Town Manager. Dean Gushing, Wilmington's 
first Town Manager, in 1951 wrote "To do the best job for the entire town, it is 
essential to establish complete coordination and cooperation between all departments. 
This is accomplished only when all concerned can see that all functions are for the 
good of the entire town and not for a single department or section." These words are 
as true for 1981 as they were in 1951. As our resources become more limited, this is 
the challenge that lies ahead in the 1980' s. 

The year 1981 saw a change in the Town's administration. Sterling C. Morris retired 
after fourteen years of service as the Town Manager. During his tenure, he enlivened 
and fostered two important themes: professionalism and stability in the management of 
the municipal government. 

These two themes were necessary in the decade of the 1970's, and are integral to the 
town's administration in the 1980' s. In the ever-changing environment of municipal 
management, the goals of professionalism and stability are guiding lights. 

In review, 1981 witnessed a variety of fiscal ups and downs for the town. 

- The tax rate dropped to $76.00 per $1,000, a reduction of $13.50 from 
the previous tax rate of $80.50. 

- The levy limit had to be reduced by $1.4 million. This loss in tax dollars 
forced the town government to eliminate some public services and personnel 
through layoff and attrition. 

The town's equalized valuation was increased from $376,900,000 to 
$449,395,000. The local aid distributed from the state was increased 
by $331,103. 

The revaluation of all property in town is now in progress. It will be 
completed prior to setting the FY-1983 tax rate. 

- The town's Silver Lake Interceptor Sewer project is nearing completion. The 
town's share of the cost is $2.9 million to be financed by a general obligation 
bond. The industrial and residential users of the system will pay for most of 
it by betterment assessments and user charges. The balance will be paid by the 
taxpayers . 



4 



The 1981 Annual Report which you have in your hands represents the efforts of all 
town departments, boards and committees. It captures the essence of the year past. 
To have your voice heard in the year 1982, please vote in the Annual Town Election 
and attend the Annual Town Meeting. 

Our American heritage of freedom and independence can only be preserved by active 
citizens participating in their local government. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Past and present Town Managers, 
Sterling Morris and Buzz Stapczynski 



5 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1. 1980 - 1981 



Board of Selectmen 



A. John Imbimbo, Chairman 
Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 
Robert J. Cain 
Michael A. Caira 
Rocco V. DePasquale 



Term 
Expires 
1983 
1983 
1982 
1982 
1984 



Town Manager 



Reginald S. Stapczynski 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



John D. Brooks, Chairman 

Linda T. McMenimen, Vice Chairman 

Bridget T. Zukas, Secretary 

James A. Demos 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 

Lester E. White 



1983 
1982 
1984 
1982 
1984 
1983 



Superintendent of Schools 



Dr. Carol Sager 



Finance Committee 



Mary J. Deislinger, Chairman 
James V. Carroll, Vice Chairman 
James Gorman, Secretary 
Walter J. Kaminski 
William J. Hanlon 
Suzanne A. Dawe 
Anita Backman 
Dennis J. Volpe 
Arthur F. Spear, Jr. 



1984 
1984 
1983 
1984 
1983 
1983 
1982 
1982 
1982 



6 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - January 1, 1981 - 1982 



Appeals, Board of 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 

George G. Robert ie 

William A. Caperci 

Neil L. Buckley, Associate 

Joseph P. McMenimen, Associate 

Carroll L. Robbins, Associate 

Assessors, Board of 

Anthony E. Krzeminski, Principal 

Charles P. Lawrenson 

Roy P. McClanahan 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 
Frankline E. Allen, Secretary 
Mildred E. Neilson 
Madelon C. Slater 

Cemetery Commission 
William H. Russell, Chairman 
Mildred M. Cavanaugh 
Willis C. Lyford 

Conservation Commission 
Chester A. Bruce, Chairman 
Joan M. Sadowski, Treasurer 
Joseph A. Guzzo 
Lawrence A. Labrie 
Ann C. Munro 
Donald H. Ugolini 
Paul A. Rose 

Council on Aging 

Wilson J. Belbin, Chairman 

Josephine M. Kelley, Vice Chairman 

Lorraine C. Brozyna, Secretary 

Lillian N. Brown, Treasurer 

Irving H. Storms 

Dianna Holmes 

Annette Knowlton 

Margaret L. McNeil 

Arthur Bernard 

Board of Health 

Joseph A. Paglia, Chairman 

James J. Durkee 

Domenic V. Tutela 

Hazardous Waste Committee 

Silverius J. Blonigen 

Milton E. Calder 

Bobby N. Stewart, Police Chief 

Daniel Wandell, Acting Fire Chief 



Term 
Expires 

1983 
1984 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



1982 
1983 
1982 



1983 
1982 
1984 



1982 
1983 
19'83 
1983 
1984 
1984 
1982 



1982 
1984 
1982 
1984 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1983 
1983 



1984 
1983 
1982 



Historical Commission 
Frank D. Cur ley. Chairman 
Melinda P. Murphy, Secretary 
Foster B. Balser 
Ruth M. Harding 
Evelyn T. Kaminski 
William G. Meyer 
Herbert L. Fielding 

Housing Authority 
George W. Hooper, Chairman 
Kevin J. McMillan, Vice Chairman 
Lorraine C. Brozyna, Secretary 

*Melvin F. Keough, Treasurer 
Warren G. Newhouse, Asst. Treasurer 

*Rep. of State Housing Authority 

Library Trustees 

Richard V. Barry, Chairman 

Patricia F. Duggan, Vice Chairman 

Maybelle A. Bliss 

David Boeri 

George W. Boylen 

Shirley F. Callan 

Personnel Advisory Board 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 
Richard V. Barry 

Planning Board 
John W. DeRoy, Chairman 
Arnold C. Blake 
William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Louis A. Maglio, Jr. 

Recreation Commission 

Paul J. Bova, Chairman 

John P. Gushing, Vice Chairman 

Lorraine M. Hanna 

George L. Howard 

Larry G. Noel 

Redevelopment Authority 
Carl Backman, Jr., Chairman 
Wilson J. Belbin, Vice Chairman 
Currie Johnson, Secretary 
Sidney R. Kaiser, Treasurer 
Jay J. Donovan, Asst. Treasurer 

Regional Vocational School Committee 
Lawrence P. Flaherty 
Frank H. McLean 



Term 
Expires 

1983 
1982 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1982 
1983 



1983 
1985 
1982 
1983 
1986 



1983 
1982 
1983 
1982 
1984 
1984 



1985 
1983 
1984 
1984 



1983 
1982 
1984 
1982 
1983 



1984 
1982 
1984 
1982 
1986 



1983 
1982 



7 



Term 
Expires 



Registrars, Board of 

Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 1983 

Robert L. Cavanaugh 1982 

Edward L. Sousa 1984 
Priscilla R. W. Lynch, Clerk 

Town Forest Committee 

Robert P. Palmer 1982 

Paul C. Duggan 1983 

Frank H. Tuttle 198A 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Elizabeth R. Fosgate 1982 

Margaret A. Wagstaff 1983 

Rachel M. Burns 1984 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

George R. Allan, Chairman 1984 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 1982 

Maurice D. O'Neil 1983 



Wilmington Arts Council 
John Brooks, Chairman 
Adele Passmore, Secretary 
Helen Handrahan 
Elizabeth White 
Marion Woller 
Annette Campbell 
Deborah LaPenta 
Kathleen Porter 
George Webster 
Daniel Ballou, Sr. 
Rita Stynes Strow 
Francis Nolan 
Arlene Surprenant 
Patricia Wesinger 

Wilmington Election Officers - 1981-1982 

Precinct 1 
Mary S. D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sencabaugh, Dep. Warden 
Joan Lanzillo, Clerk 
Sandra S. Volpe, Dep. Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Marjorie Metcalfe, Dep. Inspector 
Jane A. Hill, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. L'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Dept. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Marjorie E. MacDonald, Dep. Clerk 
Lorita B. Bower, Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Andrea Houser, Dept. Inspector 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Inspector 



Wilmington Election Officers - 1981-1982 

Precinct 3 
Mary E. Woods, Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Florence A. Balkus, Clerk 
Barbara Buck, Dep. Clerk 
Norinne M. Markey, Inspector 
Ruth J. Bedell, Inspector 
Alice Marcy, Dept. Inspector 
Mary P. McMahon, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 4 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Dept. Inspector 
Ruth Kenney, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 5 
Jean LeFavour, Warden 
Dora C. Ardolino, Dep. Warden 
Margaret Blonigan, Clerk 
Janice Rudnicki, Dep. Clerk 
Elizabeth A. Blaisdell, Inspector 
Ruth S. Coursey, Inspector 
Mary T. Ward, Dep. Inspector 
Annabell L. Antinarelli, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret Perry, Warden 
Nancy J. Tarricone, Dep. Warden 
Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 
Sandra Murphy, Dep. Clerk 
Diane J. Ryan, Inspector 
Elizabeth Andrews, Inspector 
Patricia D. McNaughton, Dep. Inspector 
Evelyn W. Conlin, Dep. Inspector 



8 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1. 1981 - 1982 



Accountant 


Robert H. Peters 


Animal Inspector 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Cemetery Superintendent 


Francis E. Downs 


Civil Defense Director 


Silver ius J. Blonigen 


Constable 


James Edward Burke 


Constable 


Arthur V. Lynch 


Dog Officer 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Engineer 


Robert L. Higgins 


Fire Chief (Acting) 


Daniel C. Wandell 


Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Highway Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


Inspector of Buildings 


Charles P. Lawrenson 


Ipswich Watershed Commission 


Herbert D. Nickerson 


Librarian 


Philip W. Meriam 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Stella Courtney 


Middlesex Canal Commission 


Stanley Webber 


Middlesex County Advisory Board 


Michael A. Caira 


Milk Inspector 


Ernest F. Romano 


Nurse, Public Health 


Abbie G. Radley, R.N. 


Plumbing Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Police Chief 


Bobby N. Stewart 


Public Buildings Superintendent 


Roy P. McClanahan 


Recreation Director 


Ronald Swasey 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Martin P. Farrell 


Town Clerk 


Priscilla R.W. Lynch 


Town Clerk (Assistant) 


Kathleen M. Scanlon 


Town Collector 


Marion C. Murphy 


Town Collector (Assistant) 


Catherine P. Lindmark 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


Town Sanitarian 


Ernest F. Romano 


Town Treasurer 


Rachel M. Bums 


Town Treasurer (Assistant) 


Elizabeth R. Fosgate 


Tree and Moth Superintendent 


Thomas 0. Sullivan 


Veterans ' Agent 


Paul A. Farrell 


Veterans' Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


Water Superintendent 


Paul C. Duggan 


Wire Inspector 


James J. Russo 



AUXILIARY POLICE 



Edwin J. Williams, Lieutenant 

Stephen Daniell 

Frances Dec 

John Gerhartz 

Frank Giannotti 

Walter C. Godfrey 

Kenneth Gray 

Roger Lessard 

Maureen M. Matarese 

Stephen Mauriello 

Michael McCoy 



Robert C. Beals, Sergeant 

William Mutchler 

James Peterson 

Ralph M. Plumer 

Philip Ryan 

George Silva 

Edward Thompson 

William F. Waller 

James I'fhite 

Edward Woods 



9 



Town Collector 



COMMITMENTS - 1981 

1983 Real Estate 

1982 Real Estate 

1982 App. Water Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1982 App. Street Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1982 Water Lien 

1982 App. Sewer Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1982 Sewer Lien 

1982 Personal Property 

1982 Farm 

1981 Real Estate 

1981 Excise 

1980 Excise 

App. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
App. Street Betterment - 
Committed Interest 
Unapp. Water Betterment 
Unapp. Sewer Betterment 
Ambulance 

TOTAL COMMITMENTS 



Paid in Full 



$ 1,000.00 
10,769,854.74 
6,603.13 
3,603.94 
11,216.67 
5,543.89 
97,281.99 
3,257.31 
1,761.31 
10,774.10 
450,576.01 
94.73 
257.60 
440,426.27 
17,248.70 
9,717.03 
355.08 
517.30 
13.92 
1,590.74 
6,564.79 
25,165.00 

$11,863,424.25 



COLLECTIONS - 1981 


1982 




1981 




1980 




OTHER YEARS 


Real Estate 


$5,091,077, 


.34 


$5,848,245, 


.94 


$102,591, 


,79 


$48,576.93 


App. Water Betterments 


4,619, 


.15 


1,014, 


.17 


615, 


,29 


107.46 


Committed Interest 


2,317, 


.48 


765.98 


467. 


,18 


20.80 


App. Street Betterment 


9,704, 


.28 


173, 


.29 


29. 


,50 




Committed Interest 


4,347, 


.76 


74, 


.64 


8. 


.28 




Water Liens 


42,544, 


.97 


7,845, 


.77 


1,362. 


.96 


642.48 


App. Sewer Betterment 


3,257, 


.31 












Committed Interest 


1,761, 


.31 












Sewer Liens 


1,545, 


.00 


879. 


.28 








Personal Property 


248,904. 


.29 


225,243, 


.93 


2,129. 


.05 


421.90 


Farm 


94, 


.73 












Motor Vehicle Excise 






382,724. 


.34 


78,283. 


,26 


7,452.03 


App. Water Betterment - Paid in 


Full 




9,717. 


,03 








Committed Interest 






355, 


.08 








App. Street Betterment - Paid in 


Full 




517. 


.30 








Committed Interest 






13, 


.92 








Unapp. Water Betterment 






292, 


.95 








Interest and Costs 






62,686, 


.91 








Ambulance 






13,263, 


.00 








Municipal Lien £, Betterment Cert 






4,104, 


.00 








Advertising Charges 






113, 


.50 








Registry Fees 






233, 


.00 








Check Fees 






25, 


.00 








Water Department Collections 






1,049,530, 


.47 









TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



$13,260,702.03 



10 



Town Treasurer 



GENERAL FUND 



Cash on Hand 7/1/80 
Receipts Fiscal 1981 
Disbursements Fiscal 1981 

Cash on Hand 6/30/81 

REVENUE SHARING 

Cash on Hand 7/1/80 

Receipts Fiscal 1981 (including earnings) 
Disbursements Fiscal 1981 



$ 615,166.48 
84,630,911.21 
-83.520,919.55 

$1,725,158.14 



$ 58,272.94 
604,310.46 
-590,251.10 



Cash on Hand 6/30/81 $ 72,332.30 

During calendar 1981, it was necessary to borrow once in anticipation of tax revenue. 

INVESTMENTS 

During calendar 1981, the program of investing idle funds in Certificates of Deposit, U.S. Treasury Noca 
repurchase agreements, and daily interest accounts was continued with the following results: 



Designation of Funds 

Revenue Sharing 
General Funds 

Investments 

Daily Interest Accounts 
Total Calendar 1981 Earnings 



Calendar 1981 
Earnings 

? 28,399.92 

447,955.94 
45,329.95 

? 521,685.81 



The cash flow and investment program is greatly assisted through the cooperation of the Town Accountant 
Robert Peters (by projecting estimates of warrants), the Tovm Collector Marion Murphy (by timely advice 
of Collector's deposits), and the Assistant Town Treasurer Elizabeth Fosgate (by carrying much of the load 
of this department while the Treasurer is tied up in the investment program). The Treasurer thanks o.i ' 
these people sincerely. 



11 



V t t. al Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended: 



Births - Final figure for 1980 191 

Births - Actually recorded for 1981 204 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1981 158 

Marriages recorded for 1981 156 

Deaths recorded for 1981 134 



Cha j . er 46, Section 15; 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 207, Section 19. 20 & 40; 

Chapter 718, Acts of 1979 made changes in the laws pertaining to marriage filings. Couples file only in one 
town, any town in the state but must file together, because of the constant changes in the laws the Town Clerk 
suggests contacting her office prior to any plans for the above. 

C hapter 207, Section 45; 

Fifty-nine burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health for the 
year. Nineteen out-of-state deaths were reported and filed in this office. Twenty-three Wilmington Veterans 
were buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 

Inflammable Permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk. Notice is sent to owner or 
occupant of the land where the storage is located on or about March 15 for renewal by April 30 of each year. 
If not registered on time, or failing to comply with the board's regulations may result in revocation of the 
permit after a public hearing. 

One hundred and nine Flammable permits were issued during the year. 
Permits & Recordings; 



UniforTrt Commercial Code recording 278 Business Certificates issued 50 

Uniformed Commercial Code terminations 24 Business withdrawals 3 

Federal Lien recordings 5 Fish & Wildlife licenses 859 

Federal Lien releases 13 Pole locations 12 

Dog licenses Issued 1,708 Medical registrations 2 

Duplicate dog tags 12 Raffle & Bazaar permits 14 



12 



other Services; 

Keep minutes of Annual and Special To\m Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request.) 

The Town Clerk has complete charge of elections and providing the State with results of State Elections and any 
changes in Town by-laws. 

Provide the County of Middlesex with up-to-date list of all persons over the age of 17 years for Jury Pool. 
Certify an undetermined number of births, marriages and deaths. 

Certify an undetermined of birth abstracts for use in school entrance, driver licenses, out-of-state travel and 
job applications. 

Supply proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance. 
Provide for sale miscellaneous books and maps. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the Town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 
Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Board of Selectmen. 
Certify same. 

Record Board of Appeals application and decisions and certify same as provided in Chapter 41A, section 11 & 15 

of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 

Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 

Keep a file of Annual Reports and Person listed books. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 

Swear town officers and board members to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town Ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 
Supervise payrolls for the Town Meetings and Election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination oaoers and the report of campaign and political finance 
expenditures. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, she has met 
with the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly meeting night, as well as, special meetings, kept the minutes 
of the meetings up-to-date, supervised the Annual Town Census by mail, kept the voting lists up-to-date, and 
registered voters during regular office hours of the Town Clerk. She also meets with the Board for special 
evening sessions to register voters and to certify nomination papers. 

The Town Clerk also has the designation as Justice of the Peace for the Town. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 

Dogs Confined 

Complaints Covered 

Court Complaints 

Court Fines 

Dogs Disposed Of 

Dogs Killed By Cars 

Residents Notified For Licenses 



1703 
477 

3340 
243 
$30 
438 
87 
960 



13 



n^rd of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1982 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (taxcition^ 




9lH 9 UJLZ f OO / • UU 


Total Appropriations (available) 




1 ^^ c /. r\/. r\r\ 
1 , / io ) hUh • UU 


Total De £ i c 1 1 s 




1 7QQ f\f\ 

IDU, /yy > UU 


School Lunch Program 




28,069.00 


Elderly Lunch Program 




17,637.00 


Free Public Libraries 




0, / JD.OO 


'Jpscxal Education 




01 A Q f\f\ 


/unuuuL iNeccbbary co oauisiy ^ourc juugmenu 




19 1 AR nn 

J.Z , Xho • UU 


County Retirement Assessment 




tlDO.UUJ.UU 


County Tax 






Underestimate 




1 O O O 1 Q /, 


Mfctropolitan Districts Area Charge 






Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 




0A7 1 AA AA 
ZO / , lUU . UU 


ii-i-or venicie txcise iax ciixs 




, J JO. 03 


O.X t. r U J. J.U L X vjw I^\^11L1.0X L/XsLXJ-CLa 




7ft1 An 
X , / • hU 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 






Ipswich River Watershed 




A / Q 1 


State Recreational Areas 




Q 1 <l "7 "7 Q A 


Audit of Municipal Accounts 






'•' verlay of Current Year 




o D£ on o 1 


Cross Amount to be Raised 






Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 






1982 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 


and 




Agency Funds 




$3,321,503.00 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 




470,000.00 


Licenses 




7,300.00 


Fines 




62,681.00 


Special Assessments 




18,407.00 


Geiieral Government 




25,402.00 


Protection of Persons and Property 




42,322.00 


Health and Sanitation 




8,572.00 


Libraries 




3,333.00 


Cemeteries 




10,648.00 


Interest 




580,899.00 


Sewer Receipts 




77,174.00 


Workmen's Compensation & Insurance Reimbursements 




17,270.00 


Ambulance 




8,837.00 


Miscellaneous 




3,094.00 


Overestimates 




13,677.94 


Voted from Available Funds 




1,716,404.00 


Personal Property 


$6,725,015.00 (? $67.00 per M 


Real Estate 


$160,762,285.00 


(a $67.00 per M 



$15,729,071.00 



1,880,102.04 
$17,609,173.04 



6,387.523.94 
$11,221,649.10 
450,576.00 
10,771,073.10 
$11,221,649.10 



14 



Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate; 



1. Betterments and Special Assessments added to taxes: 



a. Street Betterments and Interest 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 



16,760.56 
10,207.07 
5,018.62 



Liens added to taxes: 



a. Water 

b. Sewer 



97,281.99 
10,774.19 



140,042.43 



TOTAL OF ALL OTHER COMMITMENTS 



$11,361,691.53 



Library Trustees 



During the past fiscal year, the Wilmington Memorial Library has continued to supply an excellent level of 
service to the patrons of the Town, despite a reduction of $41,299.00 in the operating budget. Three key 
elements made this possible. 

1. The outstanding performance and cooperation of the Library Staff to extend the hours 
of Library operation and service to the patrons to the maximum. 

2. The cooperation of the Finance Committee in recommending a single line item budget when 
requested to do so by the Library in order to allow the flexibility needed to stay within 
the budgeted amount. 

3. The confidence of the voters at the Annual Town Meeting in approving the single line item 
as requested. 

The economic forecast indicates to us that the year ahead will be more difficult than the one just completed, 
with the purchasing power of our dollars diminishing far more than the approximate 2 1/2 percent increase in 
budget level. However, in spite of this, the Trustees take this opportunity to assure the residents of 
Wilmington, that the Wilmington Memorial Library will continue to operate in the manner you have every right 
to expect. 



15 



Library Director 



In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington 
I hereby submit my annual report with its accompanying statistics for the calendar year 1981. 

For the past two years, my report has largely been devoted to "economic" matters. 1981 can be no different. 
Prior to the impact of "Proposition 2 1/2" the Library's operating expenses had been frozen, and governed by 
two years of mandated 4% Caps on appropriations. Traditionally, the Memorial Library has been dependent upon 
local tax support and highly vulnerable to budgetary cuts. This vulnerability became a primary concern in 
1981. As a result of the passage of "Proposition 2 1/2", our total budget was reduced by $41,299. General 
operating expenses for books and materials were reduced by 34%, the full-time staff was reduced by 22% — a 
loss of two positions, and the part-time budget was reduced by 50%. 

Inflation has eroded the Library's purchasing power, and as a consequence of "Proposition 2 1/2", further 
reductions had to be made in all areas including subscriptions to various magazines, expensive business and 
legal services, circulation art and recordings, and even some limits on requests to purchase recommended books 
and library material. While still striving to meet the highly diverse needs of our users, we had to make 
difficult choices. The special interests of some had to be weighed against the interests of others because 
it was vital to maintain a balance within the Library's broader collections. One of the most visible service 
cuts was made in the elimination of passes which provided free admission to Boston area museums. Although 
many expressed disappointment, priority had to be given to maintaining the vitality of the Library's holdings. 
Throughout 1981, the Library successfully maintained its tradition of providing full reference service, and 
emphasis continued to be placed upon keeping its information current, accurate, useful, and in sufficient 
depth. Pre-school and other traditional children's programs had to be eliminated or drastically reduced. 
Joint cooperation with the Town's Recreation Department, however, permitted the "Tiny Tots Program" to con- 
tinue by utilizing the Library's facilities. 

Another visible impact was the necessity of reducing the Library's hours of operation in order to achieve 
maximum staff utilization. During the summer, in addition to being closed on Saturdays, the Library closed 
Friday evenings. During the winter, the Library closed on Wednesday and Friday evenings in order to maintain 
its Saturday hours for the duration of the school year. 

The public appeared to be understanding, cooperative, uncomplaining, and generally supportive. Many perceived 
that we could not be expected to be operating "as usual." The appearance of "normalcy" was due to the efforts 
of the staff. The entire staff must be given high commendation for their flexibility and cooperation in 
assuming new tasks in order to keep basic routines functioning. Despite pressure and uncertainty, their 
attitude and performance were a positive and rewarding result of a year dominated by the vaguaries and dictate; 
of "Proposition 2 1/2". It was the dedication and commitment that maintained the helpful and personal quality 
that are the hallmarks of the Memorial Library's service to its patrons. 

The total impact of "Proposition 2 1/2" cannot yet be measured. 1981 was in large measure retrogressive. It 
can be said, however, without equivocation that the staff responded beyond measure. The accomplishments of 
1981 belong to them. The Town of Wilmington can be assured that the challenges of the future will be met by 
these dedicated people. 



16 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 1981 



Date of founding 1871 
Library Director Philip W. Mer 

Number of days open during 1981 293 
Hours open each week (sunimer) 57 

(winter) 61 

Total holdings as of December 31, 1981 78,566 



Books 


75,042 


A/V materials 


2,749 


Newspapers 


8 


Periodicals 


258 


Art prints 


195 


Realia 


276 


Museum passes 





Microforms 


38 



Number of volumes beginning of the year 74,084 

Number of volumes purchased during the year 2,167 

Number of volumes added as gifts 157 

Number of volumes withdrawn during the year -1,366 

Missing from Library -12 

Long overdue -177 

Worn/damaged -259 

Outdated -273 

Lost by patron -45 

Number of volumes as of December 31, 1981 75,042 

Population: 1981 Town Census 18,000 

Circulation: 1981 124,891, 

Print material 115,208 

Non-Print material 9,683 

Circulation per capita 6.94 
Retrospective circulation totals 

1976 113,343 

1977 117,352 

1978 129,828 

1979 138,380 

1980 137,169 
Circulation control statistics 

Number of reserves processed 2,556 

Number of Service Charge notices sent 4,980 

Number of items involved 9,504 

Registered Library Patrons 14,972 

Total Reference and Reader Services statistics for 1981 7,069 
Retrospective Reference and Reader Services for 

1976 3,739 

1977 5,522 

1978 6,006 

1979 6,744 

1980 8,094 
Interlibrary loans 

ILL material requested from other libraries 87 

ILL material received from other libraries 101 

ILL material loaned to other libraries 

Expenditures for 1981 $182,451 

Per capita expenditure $ 10.14 

Funds transferred to Town Treasurer $4,584.46 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Chapter 3, section 1, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board were held on the second 
Monday of each month for the registration of voters and to conduct business. In conformity with Chapter 39, 
section 23B of the Massachusetts General Laws as amended by Chapter 372 of the Acts of 1978, these meetings 
were open to the public and so posted in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration sessions for the following activities. 

Annual Town Election held 

Annual Town Meeting held 

Special Town Meeting held 

Adj. Annual Town Meeting held 

Special Town Meeting held 

All held in accordance with Chapter 53 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

The Town Clerk attended meeting and conferences in order to keep abreast with the changing election laws. 
The 1981 calendar year ended with a total of 9,394 registered voters. 



1980 Federal Census 17,495 

1981 Town Census 18,000 (estimated) 

Democrats 3,973 

Republicans 899 

Unenrolled 4,522 

Total Registered Voters 9,394 



April 18, 1981 
April 25, 1981 
May 18, 1981 
June 13, 1981 
September 14, 1981 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted: 

Event Posted Date 

Annual Town Meeting. Each precinct March 27, 1981 

Special Town Meeting Each precinct April 30, 1981 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting Each precinct June 3, 1981 

Special Town Meeting Each precinct August 26, 1981 

Notices were served and posted as required for other departments and offices of the Town. 



18 



Inspector of Buildings 









1979 




1980 




1981 






No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


Dwelling (single family) 




42 


$1,608,000 


46 


$1,862,000 


24 


$ 996,000 


Residential Garages 




11 


74,000 


13 


95,000 


13 


67,500 


Additions & Alterations (res.) 




133 


600,454 


122 


785,500 


125 


781,400 








$2,282,454 




$2,742,500 




$1,844,900 


Industrial Buildings 




6 


9,847,000 


6 


2,610,000 


11 


4,985,000 


Commercial Buildings & Garages 




U 




■J 
o 


JOi , UUU 


1 

i J 


19 / , jUO 


Additions & Alterations (non-res.) 




19 


402,000 


23 


848,000 


22 


2,002,900 


Swimming Pools 






10 9 /■ R n 

J.ZZ , H jU 




, UUU 


HO 


zu D , UUU 


Signs 




10 


3,550 


17 


13,825 


15 


10,200 


Utility Buildings 




1 


18,000 


3 


214,699 







Office Buildings 









2 


1,003,300 







Sheds & Barns 




5 


6,300 


5 


4,000 


5 


9,500 


Wood Burning Stoves 




163 


84,175 


125 


62,600 


109 


54,500 








tin A QO /. 7C 








9 /,'tD'*,DUU 












6 Q r\QO QOA 




!? 9,jUy,jUU 


Renewals 




6 




6 




4 




Demolitions 




7 


26,150 


7 


73,000 


5 


13,600 


Fire Damage and Repair 




4 


35,500 


5 


58,500 


7 


68,000 


Foundations 




10 


27,500 


13 


69,200 


10 


44,000 






A51 


$ 89,150 


445 


200,700 


411 


$ 125,600 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED 


OVER TO TREASURER: 












Building Permits 




445 


$ 37,790.00 


436 


$ 18,837.90 


406 


$ 23,281.00 


Wiring Permits 




328 


4,210.75 


360 


6,154.25 


352 


7,067.50 


Gas Permits 




118 


1,026.00 


101 


1,101.00 


145 


1,610.00 


Plumbing Permits 




109 


1,060.00 


133 


1,413.00 


121 


1,256.50 


Day Care Certification (inspection 


fees) 


3 


100.00 


6 


150.00 


3 


100.00 


Industrial Electrical Permits (annual charge) 






7 


560.00 


17 


1,360.00 






1,003 


$ 44,186.75 


1,043 


$ 28,216.15 


1,044 


$ 34,675.00 



Digital Plant Opening 




L 10 K: Knheri J. Peier',. acting lown manager; Kohen lamhone. vice pre^ideni of 
the Tainhonf Corp; Gov hdwarri King; Tom MoiDonalfl manager of the U'llming- 
Ion plant; State Rep Jame\ Miceh; John DeRoy, chairman, planning hoard; A . J. 
Imhimho, chairman, hoard oj selectmen 



19 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried on during the year such as patching streets, replacing 
and painting guardrails, cleaning catch basins, making and installing street and warning signs, scraping bac 
roads with the grader, replacing broken curbing, picking up trash along roadsides, sweeping streets, etc. 

Drainage 

Drainage systems were installed, repaired or extended on the following streets: Washington Avenue, Butters 
Row, Hanover Street, Belmont Avenue, Woburn Street, Dell Drive, North Street Adams Street, Lowell Street, 
Fairmeadow Road, Federal Street, Arlene Avenue, Grove Avenue, Salem Street, Allen Park Drive, Wicks Circle 
and Middlesex Avenue. 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

The following streets were resurfaced all or in part with a stone seal treatment: Andover Street, Woburn 
Street, Butters Row, Chestnut Street, Hillside Way, Roberts Road, Cross Street and High Street, a total of 
7 1/2 miles. 

Snow and ice removal still remains a major and very expensive problem. The month of December, 1981 was one 
of our most expensive months on record due to a record snowfall for the month. The Highway Department recor 
32 1/A" for the month. 

Roadside Rubbish Pickup and Stream Maintenance 

Due to the elimination of the C.E.T.A. personnel and my summer help, these two programs did not receive the 
attention they should have. 

Equipment 

I have checked the equipment and sincerely conclude that we should replace the following equipment: An Elgin 
Pelican sweeper, three dump trucks, one pickup truck and one sender body. 

In concluding my report I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department for keeping us 
informed during the winter months of the road conditions between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 a.m., week- 
days, Saturday, Sunday and Holidays; the Tree, Water and Cemetery Departments for their cooperation and help 
during snow storms, and various departments for the cooperation extended this department during 1981. Also, 
to the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last, but not least, t 
the personnel of the Highway Department who made 1981 a very productive year, my sincere thanks and apprecia 




Sewer construction continues 

20 



Police Department 



;n accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully submit the Annual Report on 
;he activities of the Wilmington Police Department for the year of 1981. 

'he enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, complaints, and incidents reported during 
.981; and, for the most part the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Police Department. During 1981 
iverall incidents and complaints decreased by 2,726; from 13,712 during 1980 to 10,986 during 1981. Corre- 
ipondingly, criminal arrests are down by 196 from 832 in 1980 to 636 in 1981. The reductions in overall com- 
ilaints, are for the most part, due to reduced complaints in five (5) categories of relatively minor of- 
enses. Juvenile complaints are down by 1,477 from 3,129 in 1980 to 1,652 for 1981. Miscellaneous com- 
ilaints are down by 714 from 4,458 in 1980 to 3,744 for 1981. Vandalism complaints are reduced by 324 from 
'64 during 1980 to 640 in 1981. Disturbance complaints are down by 122 from 2,395 in 1980 to 2,273 during 
.981; and. Larceny complaints are reduced by 124 from 783 in 1980 to 659 in 1981. 

fithout question a number of these reductions in complaints are directly attributable to the enforcement 
ifforts of the Police Department. The reduction in Disturbance complaints has certainly been effected by 
he 170% increase in Disorderly Conduct Arrests during 1981. In 1980, 64 persons were arrested for Disorderly 
londuct, during 1981, arrests in this area were increased to 173. 

ncreases in arrests for Narcotics violations have also had a significant impact on several of these reduc- 
ions. Arrests for Narcotic violations have been increased by 79% during 1981, from 43 in 1980 to 77 in 1981. 
,. large portion of this increase has been for violations involving the sale or distribution of narcotics, 
jlthough the overall crime rate has been reduced, there has been significant increases in two serious problems 
onfronting the community. Breaking and Entering by force has increased by 16.7% from 227 in 1980 to 265 
uring 1981. Motor Vehicle accidents have increased by 10% from 969 in 1980 to 1,067 during 1981. 

he Police Department, as with other municipal services, has been severly affected by the implementation of 
reposition 2^. In order to comply with budget reductions, major changes in the department's organizational 
taffing have been necessary. For the department to maintain adequate staffing of the patrol force, it was 
ecessary to reassign the detectives, the Safety Officer, the Crime Prevention Officer, the Sergeant Prose- 
utor and, the Administrative Lieutenant. As some additional funds were made available, the department's 
afety Officer and the Sergeant in charge of investigations were reassigned to their former duties. Un- 
ortunately, the department has not been able to restore the remaining five (5) specialist positions; there- 
ore, programs such as "Operation Crime Watch" have been severely affected. It is the hope of the department, 
hat through the continued support of the citizens; these positions will be restored in accordance with the 
eeds of the community. 

he Department makes note of some of the personnel changes during 1981. The retirement of John Harvey in 
ugust. The appointment of James McNally and Stephen Parsons during September. The retirement of Anthony 
angone in December. 

n closing this report I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen, all other boards and com- 
ittees, all department heads and their workers for their support and cooperation during 1981. 

special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police Department, for without their 
upport and continuing efforts none of our accomplishments could have been realized. 



21 



ARRESTS ; 

Arson 1 

Assault & Battery 46 

Breaking & Entering Al 

Disorderly 173 

Fraud (Larcency by Check) 28 

Larceny 50 

Motor Vehicle Larceny 31 

Malicious Damage 10 

Narcotics 77 

Non-support 9 

Sex Offenses 5 

Receiving Stolen Property 12 

Liquor Violations 63 

Robbery 9 

Runaways 6 

Other 75 

636 

MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS: 

Driver's License Violations 97 

Endangering 36 

Leaving Scene of Accident 10 

Operating Under Influence 134 

Unregistered & Uninsured 82 

Speed 651 

Using Without Authority 1 

Other 651 

1,662 

MOTOR VEHICLE CITATIONS ISSUED: 

Warnings 360 

Complaints 636 

Arrests 161 

1,157 

PROTECTIVE CUSTODY BY AGES: 

11-12 2 

13-14 4 

15 9 

16 8 

17 20 

18 22 

19 27 

20 28 

21 13 

22 25 

23 19 

24 11 
25-29 27 
30-34 24 
35-39 19 
40-44 10 
45-49 11 
50 & over 10 

289 



CRIMES REPORTED: 
ASSAULTS : 

Firearm 2 

Knife 6 

Other Weapon 10 

Hands, Fists, etc. 37 

Simple Assaults 17 

72 

BREAKING & ENTERING: 

By Force 265 

No Force 5 

Attempted B&E 52 

322 

LARCENY : 

Pocket Picking 2 

Purse Snatching 15 

Shoplifting 13 

From Motor Vehicles 141 

M/V Parts & Accessories 73 

Bicycles 111 

From Buildings 52 

Other 93 

500 

LARCENY OF MOTOR VEHICLES: 87 

LARCENY BY CHECK: 72 

TOTAL LARCENIES 659 

MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN IN WILMINGTON 

RECOVERED IN WILMINGTON 20 



MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN IN WILMINGTON 

RECOVERED OUT OF TOWN 23 



MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN OUT OF TOWN 

RECOVERED IN WILMINGTON 46 

TOTAL RECOVERED STOLEN CARS 89 

ROBBERIES : 

Firearm 4 

Other Weapon 1 

Strong Arm 2^ 

7 

SEX OFFENSES: 

Indecent Exposures 17 

Indecent A&B 5 

Other _5 

27 



22 



MISCELLANEOUS: 




Arson & Bombing 


13 


Burglar Alarms 


1,268 


Disturbances 


1,644 


Domestic Problems 


229 


Emergencies 


118 


Fires Responded To 


141 


Juveniles 


1,652 


Lost & Found 


13 


Malicious Damage 


640 


Missing Persons 


41 


Missing Persons Returned 


36 


Phone Calls-Annoying, etc. 


89 


Prowlers 


109 


Sudden Deaths 


14 


Suicides 


1 


Suspicious Activities 


527 


Miscellaneous 


2,463 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


1,067 


Fatal Accidents 


1 


Cruisers Dispatched 


6,737 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS: 

Restraining Orders Served 41 

Parking Tickets Issued 677 

Firearm I.D. Cards Issued 153 

License to Carry 208 

Permits to Sell Firearms 4 

Permits to Sell Ammunition 4 

Gunsmith Permits 4 

Reports to Insurance Companies 472 

License Suspensions & Revocations 76 

License & Registration Reinstatements 53 



Town Engineer 



I hereby submit the Annual Report for the Engineering Department for the year 1981. 
Evaluation of Workload 



An examination of the workload for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent our time this year as 
follows: 20% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 25% Water and Sewer Board, Construction Projects; 
15% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 25% Town-wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 
10% All Others. 

In-house Procedures 



The updating of Assessors' maps continues to be a problem which requires a large part of our time. Current 
updated Assessors' maps are a valuable tool for the town's citizens and other town departments, boards and 
commissions . 

Projects for the Year 

Phillips Avenue which was not constructed within the layout was corrected through two Town Meeting actions of 
discontinuance and acceptance with the cooperation of the abutters. Subdivision streets inspected during the 
/ear to assure compliance with Town standards for future acceptance were Andrew Street, Houghton Road, 
Jewel Drive, Jonspin Road, and Upton Drive. 

Conclusion 



Dhe department continues to adjust time and resource priorities to better serve Town-wide interests. 



23 



Cemetery Department 



The Cemetery Department had a total of 133 burials for the year 1981. Regular maintenance work was carried 
out during the year. The employees worked throughout the year clearing and filling for expansion of usable 
ground. A low area of Section J, about 400 square feet, was raised with loam and then seeded. 



The Little League field was kept mowed all year, 
games. 



It was also lined and set up for playoff and tournament 



The Whitney Barrel Company painted approximately sixty rubbish barrels red, white and blue for the Fourth of 
July celebration. Mr. Whitney donated this service to the Town. With the help of Jack Cushing and his 
family the Common was cleaned for the Fourth of July celebration. The shrubs were trimmed and weeded and the 
grass was mowed. 



The four beach areas were cleared of grass and rubbish and maintained during the year. 
Town Park, Common, Little League Park and beach areas were removed on a regular basis. 



Rubbish from the 



Due to Proposition 2 1/2, the Cemetery Department was short of help. The Highway Department was called on for 
assistance. The Water Department helped repair a broken pipe at the office building. The plumber from the 
Maintenance Department installed new tubing in the building. 



Burials in 1981 

Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Babies 

Cremations 

Transfers 



Receipts 



16 
50 
54 
5 
6 

2 

133 



Interments 

Foundations for monuments 
Setting markers 
Affidavits 
Deeds 

Copy of deeds 



$ 8,655.00 
1,372.00 
95.00 
30.00 
7 3.00 
6.00 
$10,231.00 



Reserve 



Sale of lots 



$9,840.00 



Trust Fund 



Perpetual care 



$10,392.00 




24 



Fire Department 



It is my pleasure to submit the following Annual Report of operations, activities, and to reflect the 
accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department during the year 1981. 

The manual force consists of Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants and twenty-eight Privates. There is a 
call force of fifteen members. The department responded to a total of one thousand seven hundred and seventy- 
six calls (1776) during 1981. 



Residential Buildings 31 

Commercial Buildings 5 

Vehicles 96 

Brush, Grass and Rubbish 553 



Out of Town Assistance 38 

False Alarms or Needless Calls 139 

Rescue and Ambulance 680 

Service Calls 234 



Estimated value of property endangered was 8,305,705 

Estimated property loss was 287,944 

Permits issued for storage of oil 83 

Permits for blasting 23 

Permits for home fire alarms 25 

Permits issued for model rockets 8 

Permits issued for storage of black, powder 24 

Permits for cannon fire 6 

Permits issued for propane gas 53 

Permits issued for flammable liquids 22 

Permits issued for fireworks 1 



As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, and all flammable storage were made. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief William Nee, made all necessary inspections of 
all business establishments in Town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of fire 
brigades. Fire Prevention lectures were given to the school children. In-Service Inspections were conducted 
by Companies to Target Hazards. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
alarm system and made one hundred and seven changeovers for the light, telephone and cable T.V. companies. 
Put up one half mile of new R.C. wire on Lowell Street and five new boxes were put into service. 



Box 3296 
Box 5478 
Box 3173 
Box 3244 
Box 6353 



Analog Devices 
D. R. C. 

Thermo-Electron Co. 

Avco 

Digital 



804 Woburn Street 
350 For ham Road 

Eames Street 
126 Lowell Street 
230 Ballardvale Street 



Twenty-eight (28) members were recertified in C.P.R. as mandated by the State. 

I urge all homeowners and occupants in the Town of Wilmington to protect themselves and their families by 
installing approved early-warning fire detectors and alarms in their homes. 

I would like to express my heartfelt thanks to each and every member of the Regular and Call Department for 
their splendid cooperation during this past year. 

During 1981, the department lost the valuable services of George Anderson Jr. through retirement and Howard 
Moorman who passed away after twenty-five years of service on the Call Department. We, the members of this 
department and I'm sure many of the citizens who benefited by their devotion and service to duty, will miss 
these two gentlemen. 

Special thanks and appreciation are hereby extended to the Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, Department Heads 
and their crews for their every effort and cooperation during the year 1981. 



25 



Water and Sewer Department 



PUMPING STATISTICS 



WATER SUPPLY 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Day 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Week 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Month 

Average Gallons 
Per Day 

Average Gallons 
Per Month 

Total Gallons 
Per Year 

Annual Rainfall 



Residential Use* 
Percent of Total 
Industrial Use 
Percent of Total 
Total Water Metered 
Percent of Water Pumped** 



1977 
4,421,000 

26,521,000 

102,432,000 

2,840,000 

86,375,000 

1,036,494,000 

46.31" 

398,858,053 
51.4% 
376,981,836 
48.6% 
775,839,889 
74.9% 



1978 
4,530,000 

29,191,000 

113,113,000 

2,940,000 

89,432,000 

1,073,187,000 

31.33" 



1979 



4,065,000 
19,732,000 
105,641,000 
2,954,000 
89,870,416 
1,078,445,000 
45.47" 



CONSUMPTION STATISTICS - GALLONS 



321,073,950 
41.0% 

460,883,880 
58.9% 

781,957,830 
72.8% 



335,287,725 
40.0% 

492,740,925 
59.0% 

828,028,650 
77.0% 



1980 
3,666,000 

23,218,000 

97,731,000 

2,848,000 

86,620,000 

1,039,440,000 

37.72" 

346,379,925 
41.5% 

487,441,200 
58.4% 

833,821,125 
80 . 3% 



1981 
4,218,000 

24,887,000 

100,441,000 

2,901,976 

88,268,441 

1,059,221,300 

42.82" 

352,998,750 
43.0% 

466,973,085 
56.9% 

819,971,835 
77.4% 



*Residential use includes small commercial users, that is, all water passing through 5/8" meters only. 

**The difference between the water pumped and the water metered, 239,249,465 gallons in 1981, represents water 
used for flushing of water mains, for fires and other hydrant uses, and water lost due to breaks and leakage 
throughout the system. 



26 



During 1981 total pumpage increased slightly over the previous year. This was the first year we were =tle 
use the new trearment plant. Over 147 million gallons of water was created and put into the siystem. 1'..- :•■< -. 
ment plant was put into service on June 16, 1981. On October 3rd there was a dedication of this unique fj;;,^ 
and an open house for the public. The EPA has awarded the town a research grant to study the efficiency of IC 
removal. This is the only municipal plant in this part of the country designed to remove TCE. 



WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM 



The following new water mains were constructed during 1981; 



Street No. of Feet ^L5^ Hydrants 

Main Street 792' 10" 2 

Lee Street (Incomplete) 500' 6" 1 

Ballardvale Street 3000' 12" 7 



We have submitted several applications for water system rehabilitation grants under the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts Chapter 805 Program. If we receive these grants, which are for 50% of the construction cost, v/t w\i ■* 
be able to make much needed improvements in our water distribution system. In addition, we filed for a gr*>ai 
under the same program for a leak detection survey. This survey would be used to detect leaks in the 
mains and thereby reduce our "unaccounted-for" water. 



WATER QUALITY 

In spite of the new treatment plant, some areas of town still occasionally experience "rusty water." Th 
due to an increase in iron content in several wells not treatable by the new plant, water main breaks dui i. 
the sewer construction and stagnant water in dead-end mains. By working on the wells and improving our dts 
tribution system, we hope to reduce the number of "rusty water" complaints. 



SEWER SYSTEM 



The contract for the final leg of the sewer was awarded. During the year, construction was underway on ivur 
separate contracts. In addition, the contract for renediations to Contract //2 was awarded in September. T>' 
contract will correct the deficiencies in the original contract. At the present time the litigation bet ^ 
the Town and the original contract has not been resolved. 





27 



Public Buildings Department 



to other schools. At tl.as Tt leeied ELt thflL! r"^ f moving supplies and equipment from these buildings 
the end of the year, how^r^r's 99% completed ""i^"'^- »>- 

ir.'s af :l:",S"cL"'''"*'" '"^ " " -^--^ "-^ -"-l^i-n „.de tt 

co«ln":ed'aftet''schoo! llZ" """" s.o.e doors and painting 

":iner.„"1;atLT"ste:s":j;t"dr ' '-'^'^ - PiP- 

;^tohi-'r%e-i-™— r^hf.rr 

thr:J:^ro^ur::rsr?^;\:T^j^jhi:ix:^:;^rp"JS f?:™'- ^-^^^-^^ "^"^ 

Jn""ch' Thef car?i^d oUt th.'^rT^f ''■^''"''"'= """-""SS and Grounds Department for the outstanding manner 
durlni the year ' "■>■ " <leP"t«ents that assisted us 




Planning Board 



The days of simple governing have long since gone. The Wilmington Planning Board nevertheless, continues to 
carry on. Planning for Wilmington and its future require decisions; controversial or not, they are the begin- 
ning of change. This is one of the Planning Board's primary concerns. 

The Planning Board meets each Tuesday evening in the Town Hall Annex. The Planning Board office is open four 
days per week and is supervised by our Planning Coordinator. 

In accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41 and the Rules and Regulations governing the Subdivision 
of land in the Town of Wilmington, the Planning Board continued to review the following plans: 

Preliminary Subdivision Plan of Palmer's Place - a proposed 14-lot subdivision located off Middlesex Avenue. The 
Board approved this preliminary plan with several conditions. To date, no definitive plan has been submitted. 

Modified and new definitive Subdivision Plan of Jewel Industrial Park, an extension to the original subdivision 
to be developed by Marteg Corporation for the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. The Board secured in 1981 a 
bond in the amount of $90,000 for this portion of the subdivision. 

During 1981, thirty- three (33) plans believed not to require approval were submitted. The Planning Board found 
that twenty-nine (29) plans did not require approval and therefore were endorsed. Two (2) plans were disap- 
roved with reasons that the Subdivision Control Law would apply; one (1) plan was withdrawn without prejudice 
and one (1) plan the Board chose to take no action on. 

PARKING SITE PLAN REVIEW 

In accordance with Section IV-3 E&F of the Zoning By-Law, the Planning Board made respective recommendations to 
the Town Engineer on ten (10) Parking Site Plans. 

The Planning Board enjoyed working closely with the Board of Appeals on many appeal cases. This continued re- 
lation of assistance will always be forthcoming as in the Avco decision and others of equal Importance. 

There were public hearings held on four (4) Zoning Changes as required by Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
40A prior to Town Meeting. These proposed amendments to the Zoning By-Law and Map went to Town Meeting to be 
acted upon. 

The Planing Board held a Public Meeting early in the year with all Town Officials and interested citizens to 
present the Study Report of "Overview of Growth, Development and Change." 

It was well received as a planning tool. It was said "a great assist in land usage problems." A Map for future 
planning programs. 

The Planning Board enjoyed its head-on meeting with our new Town Manager Buzz S. Stapczynski. It was a great 
way to start working relations. We thoroughly enjoyed it, as we shall enjoy working under him on issues of 
planning for our Town. 

The Planning Board is in process of a town-owned land study. This study will take a substantial period of time 
to thoroughly complete. 

The Planning Board wishes to express their sincerest thank-you to the Town Engineer, Planning Coordinator, and 
all others who have assisted in making our work more productive for the best interest of our Town and its 
Townspeople. 

29 



' k ree Department 



Routine work was carried on by the Department. Sixty-three (63) roadside trees were taken down due to the 

.-dous conditions they created due to a disease called die-back and decline. There is no known cure for 
this disease. A great deal of time was spent in trimming out dead limbs in trying to prolong the life of the 
Numerous storm and wind damage occurred again this year causing many problems. A number of roadside 
— >ps were removed. We assisted the other town departments V7hen requested. The Christmas tree on the Common 
and at Deming Way were decorated with lights. Tree Department equipment was used to plow snow for the High- 
way Department. Seventy (70) hornet nests were removed by request. 

Dutch Elm Disease : 

Dutch elm samples were taken of the trees and sent to the University of Massachusetts to determine which ones 
were diseased. As a result of this^ fifty-seven (57) elm trees were removed. Trimming was done on others to 
rrv to prolong the life of the trees. 

iii sect Pest Control : 

This year was found to be a very expensive year due to the great infestation of gypsy moth. As much spraying 
cis possible was done to help to control the problem. It is predicted that in 1982 the problem will become 
far more serious. Spraying was done to control clinch bugs, elm leaf beetles, pine saw flies, fall web worms. 
Eastern tent caterpillars, Japanese beetles and ticks. 

s q uito Control : 

Bet'ween the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 12:00 midnight, mosquito spraying is carried on. Larvaecide was used in 
trapped water to destroy them before turning into the adult stage. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the town departments 
for their coopration, and the men of the Tree Department for their efforts during the year 1981. 




Yellow ribbons welcome hostages home 

30 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Law, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel covering 
the year 1981. 

(a) On January 1, 1981, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of 
actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien 
foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking.) 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (petition in equity for appeal for variance 
by zoning by-laws.) 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages . ) 

Joseph Scaro, et al v. County of Middlesex, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking.) 

John E. Hayward, et al v. County of Middlesex, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking.) 

John E. Hayward, et al v. County of Middlesex, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking.) 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Court (petition for registration and 
claim to Swain Court-private way.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Oxford Associates, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court (claim to recover motor vehicle 
excise taxes.) 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (action for property damage - 
negligence . ) 

George Anderson, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (claim 
for personal injury.) 

School Teacher v. Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (complaint of 
discrimination as to benefits.) 

John J. Lyons, et al v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (complaint to determine validity and extent of 
the zoning by-laws of the Town of Wilmington.) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for abatement of 
sewer use charge.) 

Joseph J. Salpietro, et al v. Robert E. Shelley, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal 
injury and property damage.) 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (complaint 
alleging sex discrimination.) 

Dorothy A. Cosman v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury.) 



31 



Fosters Pond Improvement Associ'tlon, Inc., ot als v. Aldo Caira, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (action 
in the nature of certiorari for decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit.) 

Ruth J. Gronemeyer, Exec, v. George R. Allen, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for assessment 
of damages.) 

James Rooney v. Sterling C. Morris, et als, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (appeal from decision 
of Civil Service Commission sustaining appointing authority.) 

Traffic Supervisors (AFSCME, Council 93) and Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (mediation ] 
and fact finding.) ' 

Lucille Costa, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (action for personal injury 
resulting from a motor vehicle accident.) 

George Donovan, et al v. Bruce MacDonald, et als., Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of 
the Board of Appeals denying variance to construct a single family dwelling.) 

George R. Vinal, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (action of quantum meruit to 
recover fair and reasonable value of services provided to Jewell Mfg. Company, Inc. for subdivision road and 1 
utilities and/or to reach and apply monies held by the Town of Wilmington.) 

Pacella Bros., Inc. v. Town of Wilmington Water and Sewer Commissioners, American Arbitration Association 
(demand for arbitration on sewer construction project.) 

Town of Wilmington v. AFSCME, Council 93, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for declaratory judgment tc j 
determine rights.) 

I.A.F.F. Local 1370 v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (claim for grievance.) 

Jean M. Benianati v. Wilmington Public Schools, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (claim 
for age discrimination.) 

Robert E. Vassallo v. Sterling C. Morris, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for injunction 
prohibiting appointment of sargeant.) 

Richard D. Jenkins v. James Rooney, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for false arrest and 
conversion. ) 

Jeanette F. Iverson, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal 
injury and consequential damage.) 

Paul J. Lynch v. Board of Selectmen of Town of Wilmington, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint 
for declaratory judgment.) 

Warren Atkinson v. Wilmington School Committee, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal under Chapter 71, 
section 43A.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Roberty Corey, aka, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint alleging violation ; 
of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stepan Chemical Company, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (removed to 
Middlesex Superior Court) (claim for damages and sewer and water arrearages.) 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1982, 41 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

(b) (1) During the year 1981, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington or 
its officers or agents: 

Theresa J. Moakley, et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury and 
consequential damages, etc.) 



32 



I.A.F.F. Local 1370 v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (claim for grievance.) 

Berkshire Builders, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et als, United States District Court for the District of 
Massachusetts (action for declaratory, injunctive relief and for money damages for civil rights violations.) 

David M. McCue v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (action of tort resulting 
from alleged street defect.) 

Robert E. Vassallo v. Sterling C. Morris, et als, Suffolk Superior Court (action for review of decision 
of appointing authority and personnel administrator concerning appointment of sargeant.) 

Dlanna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (complaint 
of discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B.) 

Local 1370 L.A.F.F. v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (charge of prohibited practice.) 

Raffaela Zaccagninl v. Town of Wilmington, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (claim for discrimin- 
ation. ) 

Elliott A. Drew v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (claim for violation of Collective 
Bargaining Agreement and reinstatement.) 

George A. Anderson, Jr. v. Middlesex County Retirement System (petition for involuntary disability 
retirement . ) 

Pacella Bros., Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (claim to restrain payment of re- 
tention funds re: Contract #2.) 

Elliott A. Drew v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (claim for violation of Collective 
Bargaining Agreement and reinstatement.) 

(b) (2) During the year 1981, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town. 

Town of Wilmington v. Georgia F. Jones, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (claim for refund of 
sabbatical pay.) 

A. John Imbimbo, et als v. Bruce MacDonald, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision 
of the Board of Appeals.) 

(c) During the year 1981, the following actions by or against the Town were disposed of: 

I.A.F.F. Local 1370 v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (disposed of by grievance 
being sustained after hearing by arbitrator with direction to refrain in the future.) 

Robert E. Vassallo v. Sterling C. Morris, et als, Middlesex Superior Court (dismissed by order of court.) 

I.A.F.F. Local 1370 v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (disposed of by dismissal by the 
Labor Relations Commission of claim of grievance after investigatory hearing.) 

Theresa J. Moakley, et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (settled by Town's insurer prior 
to trial.) 

David M. McCue v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (disposed of by settle- 
ment by third party insurer.) 

Raffaela Zaccagninl v. Town of Wilmington, Equal Employment Opportunity (disposed of by finding of no 
probable cause and case dismissed.) 

George A. Anderson, Jr. v. Middlesex County Retirement System (disposed of by disability retirement 
allowed . ) 

Local 1370 I.A.F.F. v. Town of Wilmington, Labof Relations (complaint withdrawn.) 

33 



Town of Wilmington v. Georgia F. Jones, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (disposed of by re- 
imbursement to the Town of Wilmington in the amount of $15,099.75, together with court costs.) 

Traffic Supervisors (AFSCME, Council 93) and Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (disposed of 
by settlement and payment of $6,000 to the bargaining unit to be apportioned amongst all the members in 
accordance with appendix A attached to decision.) 

Joseph J. Salpietro, et al v. Robert E. Shelley, et al, Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by payment 
by the Town of Wilmington of $3,000 and contribution from insurer.) 



Conservation Commission 



The need for conserving and protecting our water resources is demanding increased attention as drought con- 
ditions continue to plague New England. The Conservation Commission is required to protect wetland values, 
which are closely related to water quality and quantity. Development, which could decrease the wetlands or 
impair their functioning, and improper management and disposal of hazardous substances, which could reach our 
water supply, are two activities of great interest to the Commission. 

The duties of the Conservation Commission have increased considerably during the past year as a result of 
numerous environmental changes and the ever-dwindling amount of buildable land. In accordance with its 
legislated purposes, the Conservation Commission has held twenty-eight (28) Wetland Protection Act hearings, 
to control activity in and adjacent to wetlands, in order to preserve the wetland values. Most of these 
hearings involved the industrial and commercial building which is apparent in Wilmington. These projects are 
often of greater scope and may create a greater impact on the environment than single residential constructior 
therefore, requiring much of the Commission's time to deal with their magnitude. Commission members made over 
424 on-site inspections during the year to determine the applicability of the Wetland Protection Act, and to 
check on the status of various projects already under an Order of Conditions. 

In addition to the Commission's regularly scheduled meetings and on-site inspections, numerous meetings were 
held with state and federal officials, and with surrounding communities to keep the Commission apprised of 
ever-changing environmental concerns. In co-operation with our new Town Manager, the Conservation Commission 
has been attending all meetings of the Board of Selectmen, Board of Appeals, Planning Board, and other boards 
when issues concerning conservation are involved. 

Another function of the Conservation Commission is to administer certain town-owned lands for conservation and 
open space purposes. Such land is usually unbuildable wetland, important for its wetland and open space 
values, and for protecting and preserving watershed areas. In previous years the town has purchased some such 
land, utilizing state and federal self-help funds. Residents may also donate land to the town, specifying its 
use for conservation and thus be assured that the land will remain in its natural state, thereby receiving 
certain tax benefits as a result of their gift. 

The Commission wishes to acknowledge the addition of our newest member, Anne Munro. 

We thank all concerned individuals who generously assisted the Commission to carry out its duties in the past 
year. The upcoming year promises to add even more responsibility to the Conservation Commission as problems 
with improper handling and illegal disposal of hazardous substances continue to become more evident and 
threatening to our water supply. We, therefore, welcome and encourage continued support and interest of all 
citizens . 



34 



Housing Authority 



During the year 1981, under the joint chairaanshlp of Barbara H. Larson and George W. Hooper, the Wilmington 
Housing Authority proceeded with their conmitment to fulfill the housing needs for the Town of Wilmington. 
This housing commitment was made after various Members of the Board analyzed the housing stock and needs of 
Wilmington and compared this housing stock with neighboring communities such as North Reading, North Andover, 
Tewksbury, Reading, Chelmsford, Andover and Billerica; and learned that these communities, with the support 
of their town, sought and received housing years after Wilmington. Following is a comparison of housing units 
by town. 



Town 


Year of 




Number 


of Units 






Initial Units 


Elderly 


Family 


Section 8 


New 


Wilmington 


1957 




40 


4 


8 





North Reading 


1965 




40 


5 


15 





North Andover 


1956* 


1961 


179 


24* 


36 


60 


Tewksbury 


1965 




140 


17 


15 


50 


Reading 


1965 




80 





55 





Chelmsford 


1974 




72 


8 


40 


66 


Andover 


1957* 


1959 


176 


56* 20 


43 


40 


Billerica 


1968 




144 


2 


55 


38 



*Denotes Veterans Housing 

In following through with their housing commitment, many meetings were held with State, Federal and local 
officials as well as citizen groups to focus in on Wilmington's housing needs for elderly, handicapped and 
family so that a suitable and acceptable course could be adopted that would be embraced by all groups. As a 
result of these meetings, HUD saw fit to propose a revision to the Projects 061-001 and 061-003 - that being a 
reduction from the original proposal of 25 family units and 80 elderly units to 10 family units and 50 elderly 
units . 

In order to assure that the residents of Wilmington would have preference to these proposed units, the Board 
Members - George W. Hooper, Kevin J. McMillan, Lorraine C. Brozyna, Melvin F. Keough, and Warren G. Newhouse - 
acting under the leadership of George W. Hooper, and with research and input by member, Lorraine C. Brozyna, 
adopted a Resolution establishing a criteria for residential preference. This criteria was submitted to HUD 
and accepted, thus allowing Wilmington residents to obtain preferential residency in tenant selection. 

To modernize and update the facilities at Demlng Way, the Housing Authority was able to replace old, de- 
teriorated, inefficient windows with new thermopane, energy-efficient, easy operational, secure windows 
throughout the development. Keeping in line with the Board's goals to obtain the optimum of energy conser- 
vation and utility efficiency, the original boilers that were primarily designed for coal and oil firing, were 
replaced by high-efficiency oil/gas combination units. 

Social activities were expanded to include a summer concert by Member Warren Newhouse, and Handicapped and 
"Shut-In" activities by Member Lorraine Brozyna as well as the traditional Thanksgiving and Christmas activities 
by Members Melvin Keough, George Hooper and Kevin McMillan. 

Through the cooperation of the Council on Aging and coordinated by Member Lorraine Brozyna, the Housing 
Authority was able to outreach into the community to find people in dire need of housing who were living in 



35 



sub-standard housing without proper bathing or heating facilities. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority Board applied for 50 elderly and 10 family units under Round II for State 
funding, approval of which was not looked upon favorably due to the fact the funds were consumed by larger 
communities throughout the State. 

The Board of Selectmen were cooperative in joining the Housing Authority in attemping to find suitable 
scattered sites for family housing by submitting a number of Town-owned properties that were to be considered 
as possible building locations. I 

The Members of the Wilmington Housing Authority sincerely express their thanks to the various Town Boards and 
the Town Manager for the time and effort that they contributed and the spirit of cooperation that they ex- 
pressed in seeking the first opportunity for housing made available to Wilmington since the construction of 
the 40 units at Deming Way in 1957. ■ 

The Members also bestowed a special honor to Member Barbara H. Larson who retired from the Board after having 
unselfishly served for ten years. 



ORGANIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121B of the General Laws, as amended. 
STATUTORY REFERENCE 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 195A, as amended. 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1981 667-1 



ASSETS 

Administration Fund 
Accounts Receivable 
Investments 

Prepaid Insurance/Retirement 
Modernization Award 
Development Cost 
Less: Dev. Cost Liquidation 
TOTAL ASSETS 



575,000.00 
135,000.00 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

$ 20,435.16 Employee's Payroll Deductions 486.89 

338.66 Modernization Grant 115,225.85 

9,151.94 Tenants Prepaid Rents 14. OC 

1,277.15 Grants Authorized 440,000.00 
115,320.04 Notes Issued 135,000.00 

Less: Notes Retired 135,000.00 - - 

440,000.00 Capital Reserve 17,027.19 

$586,522.95 Operating Reserve 13,769.02 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES $586,522.95 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1981 705-1 



ASSETS 

Administration Fund 
Investments 

Prepaid Insurance/Retirement 
Development Cost 
TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 6,789.75 LIABILITIES & RESERVES 
12,062.78 Accounts Payable 

172.02 Tenants Prepaid Rents 
197,000.00 Grants Authorized 
$216,024.55 Operating Reserve 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



$ 8,940.33 
153.00 
197,000.00 
9,931.22 
$216,024.55 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1981 HUD TURNKEY 061-001 



ASSETS 

Development Fund 
Preliminary Planning Cost 
TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 4,170.52 
354.48 
$ 4,525.00 



LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 
Preliminary Notes - HUD 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



4.525.00 
4,525.00 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1981 HUD TURNKEY 061-003 



ASSETS 

Development Fund 
Investment 

Preliminary Planning Cost 
TOTAL ASSETS 



37.80 
7,762.20 
1,507.00 
$ 9,307.00 



LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 
Preliminary Notes - HUD 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



9,307.00 
9,307.00 



36 



Board of Health 



During 1981 Thomas Morris resigned from the Board of Health. Mr. Domenic Tutela was appointed by the Town 
Manager to replace Mr. Morris. 

Dr. Antonia Bayog, Public Health Physician, passed away. No replacement has been made. 

Stanely Roketenetz completed two years of a three-year contract for the collection of refuse. 

Anne Butters, Public Health Nurse, retired after 32 years of service to the Town. 

Share was dropped from the budget as a result of Proposition 2 1/2. 

A Hazardous Waste Committee was appointed by the Town Manager. 

A town-wide Flue and Pneumonia Clinic was conducted. 

Mr. Leo LeBlanc acted as Director during vacation periods. 

The Board of Health met routinely on a monthly basis for the conduct of its business. 
The Board participated in Health for '81' and co-sponsored a Hypertension Screening Clinic. 
The Board, in cooperation with the School Department, assisted at a Mantoux and Tetanus/Diphtheria Clinic. 
The Board conducted a Flu Clinic for DataMetrics, a local industry. 
The Board assisted Sweetheart Plastics with a Flu Clinic. 

The Board arranged with the Regional Health Center to provide free poison level testing. 

Blood Pressure Clinics were held at several drug stores and the library. 

Funds for Wilmington Family Counseling were reduced from $17,000 to $13,500. 

The Board worked with the Town By-Law Committee in their study of existing by-laws. 

The Board of Health participated in the lead paint testing at the Swain School. 

The Board of Health wishes to express a special thanks to Anne Butters for her long and dedicated years of 
service to the Town as a Public Health Nurse. 

Thanks also is extended to the Wilmington Women's Club for their help and assistance during the course of the 
year. 

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

1. Immunizations Office visits 94 

Home visits 24 

Tetanus/Dlptherla Clinic 41 
(high school seniors) 

Immunizations are being given on an ongoing basis at the Nurses' Office from 
8:30-9:30 a.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. 

2. Communicable Diseases Reported 37 

37 



3. Flu/Pneumonia Immunization Clinic Flu vaccine doses administered 495 

Pneumonia vaccine doses administered 168 



4. Tuberculosis Report T.B. tests to high school seniors 41 

Office visits 127 

Home visits 20 

B. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1. Nursing visits during year 304 

Office visits 91 

2. Premature births reported Reported 17 

Home visits 23 

Premature deaths 1 

3. Newborn Infants Home visits 9 

4. Hypertension Program Office visits 158 

Attendance at monthly clinic 62 

Location at drug stores & library 113 

Location at polls on voting days 205 

Health Fair - Woburn Mall 359 

5. Diabetic Screening Office visits 14 

Attendance at Drop-In-Center 46 

Fees collected $56,00 

6. Drop-In-Center Number of counseling sessions 44 

Attendance 613 

7. Gentle Exercise Program Number of sessions 29 

Attendance 304 

8. General Health Supervision Home visits 387 

C. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

1. Licenses and Permits Sewerage 80 

Food 80 

Milk Store 67 

Stable 30 

Refuse Transportation 24 

Installers 30 

Piggery 

Miscellaneous 131 
Fees collected $5,751.00 

2. Food Establishments Inspections 131 

3. Complaints 315 

4. Inspection of Animals Animals quarantined 34 

Animals released 34 

Animals disposed of 282 

5. Dental Clinic Number of children serviced 1,341 

6. Installer's Examination Exams given 11 

7. Sewerage Inspections/Investigations 527 

8. Bathing Areas cted 10 



C, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (continued) 
9 . Recreation Camps 

10. Court 

11. Rabies Clinic 

12. Wilmington Family Counseling 



Inspections 

Court appearances 

Dogs immunized 
Fees collected 

Scheduled appointments 

Cost at $26.00 each appointment 

Client fees 

Cost to town 



10 
336 

$1,008.00 

1,528 
$40,148.00 
$26,027.08 
$14,120.94 



Historical Commission 



Despite zero funding, the Historical Commission managed to have a somewhat productive year with the help of a 
few precious volunteers. 

Several open houses were held at the Harnden Tavern on the first Sunday of each month. The Friends of Harnden 
Tavern also sponsored several events, including another highly successful Christmas Social. The Historical 
Commission was pleased to accept help and several new donations of furnishings from the Friends, our local 
support group for the Harnden Tavern. 

On May 29, 1981, Project Enterprise Students, grades 4 through 6, were treated to a "Day in the Life of Early 
America". Activities included hearth cooking, quilting, butter churning, stenciling, candle making, working 
with old tools, rug hooking and making ice cream. All this took place with the volunteer help of many parents 
under the direction of Mrs. Melinda Murphy of the Historical Commission. A similar project was held for two 
fourth grade classes at the Woburn Street School. 

Work on an Historical Tour Map of the town has been completed, but will lie dormant without proper funding. 

Historical markers identifying 25 homes worthy of note are in place, and, hopefully, more will follow this 
year. 

The Commission was very fortunate in securing a young couple, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Columbo, as tenants and 
caretakers for the Harnden Tavern. Mr. Columbo is Youth Minister at the Congregational Church and Mrs. Columbo 
is in her final vear at the University of Massachusetts majoring in Art History. 



39 



• fifyy 



Veterans' Services 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115 as amended with strict com- 
pliance to this Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy Veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforeseen needs. Final 
approval of benefits comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The balance for the first six months of 1981 from previous appropriation was $17,627.84. A balance of 
$12,897.47 remaining July 30, 1981. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1981 was $9,000.00. Total ex- 
pended for aid to Veterans and their families for the entire year 1981 was $9,125.48. 

Total reimbursement for 1981 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's 
office was $3,529.25. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioner's office is shared by the Town, 
the Town's share on assignment cases was $1,764.63. The total amount of $3,529.25 has been turned over to the 
Town Treasurer and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustments of any monies can be made before State 
reimbursement to the Town. 

This department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social Security, 
V.A. Disability, Pension, Compensations and G.I. Education or on the job training; plus, aiding applicants 
for S.S.I. , unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns and lack of work, always has an impact on expenditures. 
Case load varies from time to time. 

The appropriation for 1981 and six months of 1982 was $9,000.00 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a balance 
of $4,971.39 forwarded for the first six months of 1982. 



Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund 



A travelogue was given by Jens Bjerre entitled "China After Mao" at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on 
May 6, 1981 at 8:15 p.m. 

The Carter Lecture Committee will present a program by Kelley and Tanguay, Duo-Pianists, at the Herbert C. 
Barrows Auditorium in Wilmington at 1:00 p.m. in the afternoon of May 11, 1982 for the students of Wilmington 
High School and at 8:15 p.m. on May 12, 1982 for the general public of Wilmington. 

The Carter Lecture Committee mourns the passing of Ken Wilson, a Committee member since July 1969. Our 
sympathy is extended to his wife Eunice, his son Kenneth, Jr, and grandchildren." 

The Carter Lecture Programs are presented free to Wilmington Residents. 



40 



Applicant 

Case #1-81 
Maurice D. O'Neil 



Case #2-81 
Olin Corporation 
Mr. Barry L. Solar, 
Attorney, Representing 

Case #3-81 

Route 93 Realty Tr, , 

Dom. Passanisi & Frank 

Soracco, Trs., Joseph 

Courtney, Attorney 

Representing 

Case #4-81 

Alessi Realty Trust 



Case #5-81 

Route 93 Realty Tr. , 
Dom. Passanisi & Frank 
Soracco, Trs., Joseph 
Courtney, Attorney 
Representing 

Case #6-81 

Route 93 Realty Tr. , 

Dom Passanisi & Frank 

Soracco, Trs., Joseph 

Courtney, Attorney 

Representing 

Case #7-81 
Norman Giles 



Case #8-81 

Gibbs Oil Company, Inc. 
Joseph Courtney, Attorney 
Representing 



Board of Appeals 



Reason for Appeal Decision 

To acquire a variance from Section IV-1 (Schedule of Withdrawn 

Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 

family dwelling on lots having less than the required 

permanent means of access to an accepted street and 

further authorizing the subdivision of a parcel of land 

into two lots meeting the geometric requirements of 

Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) and one having 

less than the required depth and area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-4 of the Wilmington Granted 
Zoning By-Law to erect and maintain fence within set 
back and yard area for property located at 51 Eames St. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-3 (Off-street Granted 
Parking) of the Wilmington Zoning By-Laws to allow less 
than the required number of parking spaces and to allow 
parking areas within required set backs pursuant to 
Section V-1 and Section V-4 (c & d) . 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Denied 
Requirements) authorizing the subdivision of a parcel 
of land into two single family house lots having in- 
sufficient frontage and depth. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-3 (Off-street Granted 
Parking) of the Wilmington Zoning By-Laws to allow less 
than the required number of parking spaces and to allow 
parking areas within required set backs pursuant to 
Section V-1, and Section V-4 (c & d) . 



To acquire a variance from Section V-3 (Off-Street Granted 
Parking) of the Wilmington Zoning By-Law to allow less 
than the required number of parking spaces and to allow 
parking areas within required set backs pursuant to 
Section V-1 and Section V-4 (c & d) . 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Withdrawn 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient area and 
depth for property located on Clyde Avenue. 

To appeal a decision of the Building Inspector denying Granted 
a building permit and alternatively to obtain authori- 
zation for a building permit for a non-conforming use 
pursuant to Section VI of the Zoning By-Law at 342 
Main Street. 



41 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //9-81 
Shirley Clooney 



Case //10-81 
Joseph Laschi 



Case /'11-81 

Jack C. Whitenell 



Case #12-81 

Louis J. Farkas, Jr. 



Case //13-81 
Francis LaRoque 



Case #14-81 

Manuel J. Barry, Jr. 



Case #15-81 
Douglas Dukeshire 



Case #16-81 

Luccl Realty Trust 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-IC (non-conforming use) authorizing the change in 
use of a real estate office to an office for a general 
contractor (roofer) on property located at 943 Main St. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authoriz^^ng the construction of a single 
family dwelling on two lots both having sufficient 
frontage and area but insufficient depth at right 
angles for property, located on Aldrich Road. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the installation of a swim- 
ming pool within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
Vl-l.D (Non-conforming use) authorizing the construction 
of an addition to the existing building. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a garage 
within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a brick 
planter and sign within a required reserve front yard 
for property located at 226 Lowell Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Case #17-81 

Marion Maxwell, Owner 

Bernie Lavita, Agent 



Case #18-81 

John L. & Deborah Doherty 



Case #19-81 
Donald P. Rossi 



Case #20-81 
Leita B. Ruggiero 



Case #21-81- ' 

William Harrison, Jr. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a handi- 
capped ramp within required reserve front and side yard 
for property located at 94 Grove Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Section III-l.A.l (uses per- 
mitted in Residential Districts) authorizing the con- 
struction of an additional house on a single lot. 

To acquire a variance from Section III-l.A.9a (accessory 
uses to residential district) authorizing the construct- 
ion of a second garage for the storage of personal prop- 
erty within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of a parcel 
of land into three lots, one conforming and two non- 
conforming (insufficient frontage and depth) and 
authorizing the construction of two single family 
dwellings . 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) allowing the construction of a dwelling 
on a lot having insufficient frontage and depth for 
property located on Adams Street. 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



42 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //22-81 

Paul G. & Lorraine 

Hertnann 

Case //23-81 
Charlotte A. Guthrie 



Case //24-81 
Edwin J. Williams 



Case //25-81 

Joseph V. Balestrlerl 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the installation of a swim- 
ming pool within a required reserve side yard. 

To appeal decision of the Building Inspector denying 
building permit and alternatively, to obtain authori- 
zation for building permit for a non-conforming use 
pursuant to Section VI of Zoning By-Law. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the Installation of a 
swimming pool within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) of the zoning by-law to authorize the 
division of a parcel of land into two lots, one having 
less than required frontage, depth and area and the 
other having less than the required depth. (2) the 
Issuance of a building permit for a single family resi- 
dence, property located on 14 Railroad Avenue and 
Railroad Avenue Extension. 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Case //26-81 
Donald Sullivan 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-4-B-5 authorizing towing and the enclosed storage 
of vehicles with various degrees of damage for property 
located at 779 Woburn Street. 



Withdrawn 



Case //27-81 
Arthur J. Epstein 



To acquire a special permit authorizing the alteration 
on a non-conforming use in accordance with Section Vl-1 
(Non-conforming uses) for property located at 279 Main 
Street. 



Granted 



Case //28-81 

Arthur & Rhonda Blbeau 



Case //29-81 
Rogert Martinez 



Case #30-81 



Arthur R. 
Jr., Inc. 



Smith, 



Case //31-81 
Harold M. & Eunice 
Moody 



Case #32-81 
James H. Munns 



Case #33-81 
Michael A. Rowland 
Joseph Courtney, 
Representing 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling within a required reserve front yard 
for property located at Kendall Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a shed 
within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect a sign within a required re- 
serve front yard for property located at 214 Andover 
Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the subdivision of a parcel 
of land into two non-conforming lots for the purpose 
of constructing a single family dwelling on the newly 
created lot for property located on Lawn Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage, 
depth and area for property located on Burlington Ave. 

To acquire a variance from Section IV-3 (off-street) 
parking) of the Wilmington Zoning By-Law to allow less 
than the required number of parking spaces for property 
located on Lopez Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



43 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //34-81 

Rocco V. DePasquale 

Joseph Courtney, Attorney 

Representing 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-LD (non-conforming) uses of the Wilmington Zoning 
By-Law to authorize the exte^ision and enlargement of a 
non-conforming use and a building permit for the con- 
struction of a non-conforming building located within 
the required reserve side yard for property at 193 
Main Street. 



Granted 



Case //35-81 
Donald Sullivan 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-A-B-5 authorizing (1) towing and the enclosed 
storage of motor vehicles with various degrees of damage 
and (2) limited repairs of damaged vehicles, for property 
located at 779 Woburn Street. 



Withdrawn 



Case //36-81 

Arthur E. Harding, Jr. 



Case #37-81 

Jack Cushing, Chairman 
Wilmington Fourth of 
July Committee 

Case #38-81 

James F. Banda, Jr. 



Case #39-81 

George B. & Eleanor 

Donovan 



Case #40-81 
Michael R. Carlson 



Case #41-81 
George L. Barboza 



Case #42-81 
Arthur Siannas 



Case #43-81 
John T. Gardner 



Case #44-81 

Richard & Paul Whitney 



Case #45-81 
Michelle R. Dinatale 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of a parcel 
of land into two lots of insufficient frontage, depth 
and area, for property located on Nassau Avenue. 

To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
VI-2 allowing a carnival to be held at this location 
(high school parking lot) on a temporary basis, prop- 
erty located on Church Street, 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the issuance of a building 
permit for a single family dwelling on a lot having 
insufficient frontage, depth and area and further 
authorizing relief from the specified set-back require- 
ments for property located on Morningside Drive. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the issuance of a building 
permit for a single family dwelling on a lot having 
insufficient frontage, depth and area and further 
authorizing relief from the specified set-back re- 
quirements for property located on Dorchester Street. 

To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-l-B authorizing the conversion of an existing 
structure into an In-Law apartment. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the installation of a swim- 
ming pool within a required reserve rear yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a build- 
ing within a required reserve side and rear yards. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a shed 
within a required reserve side and rear yards. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a pool within 
a required reserve side yard. 



Grant e4 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



44 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //46-81 
John Benevento 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
VI-ID (non-conforming use) authorizing the erection of 
a portable cement mixer. 



Granted 



Case //47-81 
Francis Sferrazza, 
Agent 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
VI-1 (non-conforming use) authorizing the construction 
of an addition to an existing structure on property 
located on School Street Rear. 



Granted 



Case #48-81 
Paul W. Soule 



Case //49-81 
Jacqueline A. Arzllll 



Case //50-81 
Anthony and July 
Pagllarulo 

Case //51-81 

Robert Watklns, Sr. 

Robert's Carpet Outlet 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Granted 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Withdrawn 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage 
for property located on Nunn Road. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Granted 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section Granted 
Vl-2 (temporary uses) authorizing the storage of floor 
coverings in a trailer within a General Business District. 



Case //52-81 

Charles Hannoosh 

C & J Lawnmower Ser. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
Vl-2 (temporary uses) authorizing the storage of small 
engines and parts in a trailer within a General Business 
District . 



Granted 



Case //53-81 
Margaret A. Pelfer 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) allowing the construction of a dwelling 
on a lot having insufficient depth and area for property 
located on Auburn Avenue. 



Granted 



Case //54-81 
Stephen W. Olson 



Case //55-81 

Helen-Marlon Realty Tr. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage 
and depth. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) 
authorizing the construction of a single family dwell- 
ing on a lot having insufficient depth at right angles 
at every point in the minimum frontage for property 
located on Boutwell Street, Lot 4. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case //56-81 

Helen-Marlon Realty Tr. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) 
authorizing the construction of a single family dwell- 
ing on a lot having insufficient depth at right angles 
at every point in the minimum lot frontage for property 
located on Boutwell Street. 



Granted 



Case //57-81 

Helen-Marion Realty Tr. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) 
authorizing the construction of a single family dwell- 
ing on a lot having insufficient depth at right angles 
at every point in the minimum lot frontage for property 
located on Boutwell Street, Lot 6. 



Granted 



Case //58-81 

William R. Brookings 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a pool within 
a required reserve side yard. 

45 



Granted 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case ff59-81 
Stephen G. McLean 



Case //60-81 

Richard J. & Norma B. 

Wallace 



Case //61-81 
Joseph R. Ruotolo 



Case #62-81 

Norman Giles, Agent 



Case //63-81 
Marvin Weiner 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requireroent8)authorizing the erection of a garage 
Within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a pool within 
a required reserve side and rear yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having Insufficient area and 
depth for property located on Clyde Avenue. 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-1 (non-conforming uses) authorizing the extension 
and enlargement of an existing non-conforming use 
(restaurant facilities) . 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case //6A-81 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 



Case #65-81 
Shell Oil Company 



Case #66-81 
Edward W. Howard 



Case #67-81 

Alan Altman, Agent 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with Section 
I1I-4-B-5 authorizing the uses that are similar in 
character and affect on adjacent property. 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-1 (non-conforming uses) authorizing the extension 
and enlargement of an existing non-conforming use, for 
property located at 361 Middlesex Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) 
authorizing the construction of a single family dwell- 
ing on a lot having insufficient depth at right angles 
at every point in the minimum lot frontage for property 
located on Burlington Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a pro- 
fessional office building within a required reserve 
side yard to facilitate the joining of an existing 
office building to the proposed structure on a lot 
having insufficient frontage and depth for property 
located at 400-402 Main Street. 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #68-81 

Simon Cutter, Agent 



To allow the subdivision of a lot of land containing 
two single family dwellings Into two non-conforming 
lots having insufficient frontage and depth, according 
to Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) for property 
located on Brentwood Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #69-81 
John D. Lorden 



Case ^/70-81 
Verne E. Moberly 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) allowing the construction of a shed within 
a required reserve yard area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a garage 
within a required reserve yard area. 



Denied 



Granted 



46 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #71-81 
Fred Rubinovitch 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-1 (non-conforming use) authorizing the extension 
and enlargement of an existing non-conforming use 
(leasing and renting of motor vehicles for property 
located at 324 Main Street. 



•Denied 



Case #72-81 
Ventura Canelas 
James Feld, Attorney 
Representing 

Case #73-81 

Avco Systems Division 



Case #74-81 

Winston F. Corbett, Tr. 
Dawson MacDonald Realty 
Tr., Jos. Courtney, 
Attorney, Representing 

Case #75-81 
Donald N. Pane 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a wind 
turbine Generator (Windmill to a height of sixty-five 
(65) feet more or less) . 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a build- 
ing 135 feet plus high, which exceeds the maximum al- 
lowable limit of three stories or forty f^et in height. 

To acquire a variance to allow construction of a build- 
ing within the required, reserve rear-yard/side-yard 
set-back as specified in Section V-1 on the Zoning By- 
Law for property located on Lopez Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the enlargement of an ex- 
isting deck within a required reserve rear yard. 



Withdrawn 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #76-81 
Hans H. Finne 

Case #77-81 
John R. Burke 



Case #78-81 
Robert White 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 to allow a 

sign to be erected within a required reserve yard area. 

To acquire a variance frdm Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction' of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve yard area. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #79-81 
Donald Sullivan 



Case #80-81 
Kenneth DeMaggio 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-4-B-5 authorizing limited repairs to motor vehicles 
at property located at 779 Woburn Street. 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
Vl-1 (non-conforming use) authorizing the construction 
of an addition on a non-conforming lot. 



Denied 



Granted 



Case #81-81 
William T. Foreman 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-l-B authorizing the use of a commercial greenhouse 
in a residential district for property located on 
Gorham and Garden Streets. 



Withdrawn 



Case #82-81 

David V. Delnnocentis 



Case #83-81 
Elizabeth Collins 



Case #84-81 
Ventura Canelas 



To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section VI-l.D 
authorizing the erection of an addition to a non-conform- 
ing building. 

To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section VI-l.D 
authorizing the erection of an addition to a non-conform- 
ing building. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 and/or special 
permit from Section V-2.B(Schedule of Requirements author- 
izing the erection of a windmill to a height of 65 feet 
more or less. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



47 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //85-81 

Avco Systems Division 

Joseph Courtney, Attorney 

Representing 

Case //86-81 
Joseph G. Zukas 



Case //87-81 

Albert P. Valentino 



Case #88-81 

Robert & Zella Longo 



Case //89-81 
Earl Hupper 



Case #90-81 
Shell Oil Company 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a build- 
ing 135 feet in height with eight stories for property 
located at 201 Lowell Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a garage 
within a required reserve front and side yards. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a garage 
within a required reserve yard area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the subdivision of a parcel 
of land into one conforming and one non-conforming 
lot (insufficient frontage and depth) and further 
authorizing the construction of a single family dwell- 
ing on said non-conforming lot. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage 
and depth for property located on Clark Street. 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-1 (non-conforming uses) authorizing the extension 
and enlargement of an existing non-conforming use, 
within a required reserve front yard which requires a 
variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
for property located on 361 Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Case #91-81 

Avco Systems Division 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
V-2-B (height) authorizing the construction of a Sliding 
Drop Test Facility exceeding the maximum height limita- 
tions as specified in Table V-1 (Schedule of Require- 
ments . 



Granted 



Case #92-81 

Edward T. McLaughlin 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow a sign to be erected within a 
required reserve yard area. 



Granted 



Case #93-81 
Charles Natoll 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the subdivision of a lot into 
two non-conforming lots for the purpose of constructing 
an additional single family dwelling for property lo- 
cated on 831 Main Street. 



Granted 



Case #94-81 

David & Carole Zampese 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-2-B-1 authorizing the conversion of a building in- 
to a two family dwelling, for property located on 100 
Main Street. 



Granted 



Case #95-81 
George Long, Agent 
Allstate Insurance Co. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the installation of a sign 
within a required reserve front yard. 



Denied 



48 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #96-81 



John L. & Deborah 
Doherty 



Case #97-81 



Linda E. Walsh 



Case #98-81 



Joseph Langone, et al 
Park Realty Trust 
Joseph Courtney, 
Attorney, Representing 



Case #99-100 



Winston F. Corbett, et al 
Trs., Dawson-MacDoanld 
Realty Trust 

Joseph Courtney, Attorney 
Representing 

Case #100-81 



Donald and Christine 
Dehoff 

Case #101-81 



Arthur R, Smith, Jr. 



OFFICIAL MAP 



Case #S-1-81 



William T. Foreman 



Case #S-2-81 



Joseph V. Balestrierl 



Case #S-3-81 



William T. Foreman 



Case #S-4-81 



Richard W. Proctor 



To acquire a variance from the provisions of the Wilming- 
ton Zoning By-Law to divide the parcel of land containing 
a single family dwelling Into two lots, one lot with less 
than the required depth and the second lot with less than 
the required frontage and depth for property located on 
19 Concord Street. 

To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section III-l-B-4 
of the Zoning By-Law authorizing a nursery school for the 
day care of children in a single family residence located 
in a Single Residence "A" District. 

To appeal decision of the Building Inspector that appli- 
cant must obtain special permit from the Board of Appeals 
to authorize conversion of a one-family detached dwell- 
ing for use as a two-family dwelling, or in the alterna- 
tive to obtain a special permit for such conversion pur- 
suant to Section III-I-B of the Zoning By-Law for prop- 
erty located at 7 McDonald Road. 

To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section III-6-C 
of the Zoning By-Law (Flood Plain District) authorizing 
the industrial use of land located in an Industrial 
District, but subject in part to the overlay of a Flood 
Plain District, for property located at Lopez Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve front and side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an addi- 
tion within a required reserve front yard. 



To construv t a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Robert Stevens, 16 Berkshire Dr., Winchester (shown on 
Assessors' Map 67, Parcels 37, 38 and 39) and not shown 
on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, S.81E) on a way known 
as Gorham/Garden Streets. 

To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Joseph V. Balestrieri, (shown on Assessors' Map 43, 
Lot 25) and not shown on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, 
S.81E) on a way known as Railroad Avenue Extension. 

To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Robert Stevens, 16 Berkshire Dr., Winchester (shown on 
Assessors' Map 67, Parcels 37, 38 and 39) and not shown 
on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, S.81E) on a way known 
as Gorham/Garden Streets. 

To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Richard W. Proctor (shown on Assessors' Map 48, Parcel 
55) and not shown on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, S. 
81E) on a way known as Melrose Avenue. 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Granted 



49 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //S-5-81 
George and Eleanor 
Donovan 



Case #S-6-81 

Simon Cutter, Agent 



Case //S-7-81 
Jacqueline A. Arzilli 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
George B. & Eleanor Donovan (shown on Assessors' Map 
11, Parcel 22) and not shown on the Official Map (G.L. 
ch. 41, S.81E) on a way known as Dorchester Street. 

To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Carl Finley (shown on Assessors' Map 40, Parcel 80) and 
not shown on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, S.81E) on a 
way known as Fairmont Avenue. 

To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Umberto & Carmela Arzilli (shown on Assessors' Map 51, 
Lot 86B) and not shown on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41. 
S.81E) on a way known as Nunn Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Wit hd rawn 



Case #S-8-81 
Margaret A. Peifer 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Victor A. Dubois, (shown on Assessors' Map 32, Parcel 
104) and not shown on the Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, 
S. 81E) on a way known as Auburn Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #S-9-81 
Richard T. & Carole 
Crowley 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Richard T. and Carole A. Crowley (shown on Assessors' 
Map 67, Parcel 25C) and not shown on the Official Map 
(G.L. ch. 41, S. 81E) on a way known as Lee Street. 



Granted 



Case //S-10-81 

Linda J. Roberts and 

David B. Wells 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Linda J. Roberts and David B. Wells (shown on Assessors' 
Map 67, Parcel 25) and not shown on the Official Map 
(G.L. ch. 41, S.81E) on a way known as Lee Street. 



Granted 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

The following is a list of all weighing and measuring devices, scales, meters, pumps, and weights that were 
tested, sealed, not sealed, and condemmed during the year 1981 





Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Adi usted 


Condemmed 


Scales, Balances, Weights 


225 


36 


75 


28 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


194 


14 


65 


29 


Capacity Measures 


42 


14 


35 


20 


Other Measuring Devices 


55 


19 


30 


25 


Prepackaged Foods Reweighed 


6,100 









50 



Council on Aging 



As the Council on Aging reviews its accomplishments for the year 1981, it saw an increase in the demand for 
services. Inflation took a toll on the purchasing income of our elder citizen. The cost of heating and light- 
ing their homes became unbearable, as did the cost of buying the bare necessities of food and clothing. 

The Council on Aging was there in 1981 to assist the elderly in these areas: $83,500 in fuel assistance was 
obtained for our seniors through the Fuel Assistance Program; between 6,000 - 7,000 hot meals were delivered 
to our shut-ins and from 4,000 - 5,000 meals were served at the North Intermediate School Meal Site; through 
our on-going Clothes Program, donations of clothes are constantly being received at the Drop-in-Center . These 
clothes are available to any senior. 

The Council in the year 1981, under the Chairmanship of Wilson Belbin, Vice Chairman Josephine Kelley, Secre- 
tary Lorraine Brozyna, Treasurer Sheldon Maga, Arthur Bernard, Lillian Brown, Diane Holmes, Ann Knowlton, 
Nickie Johnson, Margaret McNeill, Irving Storms, Co-ordinator Edith Cunningham and Senior Aide Winefred Duran, 
worked together to operate and maintain programs which met the needs of the Wilmington Elder Citizens, through- 
out the year. 

The budget to finance the operation of the senior programs was derived from tax dollars voted upon at the 
Annual Town Meeting. Programs and services operate out of the Senior Citizens Drop-in-Center, donated by 
Mike Demoulas of Demoulas Supermarkets. The Center was utilized by 1,400 - 1,600 seniors a month, who sought 
companionship or help. 

The seniors' Minibus transported 500-600 seniors a month to doctors, dentists, hospitals and other elderly re- 
lated travel. This year our seniors will be transported more efficiently, due to the acquisition of a two-way 
radio purchased through a $2,022 Grant from Minute Man HomeCare Corp. 

Many activities were available to the senior citizen in 1981. Exercise Program-held at the Knights of Columbus 
Hall through a donation of the Knights; Free Bowling-at the Brunswick Bowl-a-Way Lanes in Burlington, provided 
through a combined donation from the management of the Lanes, a $500 donation from the Ford Co. and a $250 
donation from Altron Co. ; Dance Lessons-instructions donated by Fred and Mary McEvoy, of Andover; a Swimming 
Program, through the courtesy of the Shawsheen Technical School; a Walk Program, through the leadership of 
Edward Curtis, a senior volunteer; Arts and Crafts sessions, under a committee of volunteer seniors; Chairman 
Margaret Pellegrino, Frances Calandrello, Mary Cunningham, Lillian Brown, and Treasurer Marguerite Baker; a 
Bi-monthly Whist Party, under the supervision of the Arts and Crafts Committee. All money made by the com- 
mittee through their Whist Parties and Fairs was spent on articles for the Drop-in-Center not covered by the 
seniors' budget. 

Every weekday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Drop-in-Center a senior citizen can find companionship and 
help. Through donations from the Yum Yum Shop, Thomas English Muffins, and the budget, seniors can obtain 
coffee and a goodie throughout the day. 

Legal Services, Counseling, Homemaking, Nursing, Chore Workers and Fuel Assistance were available to the el- 
derly through the Co-ordinator. 

The year 1981 saw an increase in our Social Programs, such as, the Vial of Life; Friendly Visitors; Dial-a- 
Friend; Sunshine Lady; and S.P.A.N. (Senior Postal Alert Network). 

The Council on Aging was assisted in providing many of our programs and services through the generous dona- 
tions of many organization, clubs, churches, stores and individuals. Through a very generous donation from 



51 



the Wobum District Court and the Wilmington Police Department, the Council on Aging was able to give a Christ- 
mas gift to many of Wilmington's very old, disabled, hospitalized and low-income seniors. A continual supply 
of plastic goods for the Drop- in-Center was donated by Sweetheart Plastics Company. All the sugar, and paper 
napkins throughout the year were supplied by Diamond Crystal Salt. McDonald's Hamburger donated monthly birth- 
day cakes and cold drinks for the seniors' birthdays. 

Dinners or party gifts were received from: Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks; American Legion Post 136; Sweetheart 
Plastics Company; St. Dorothy and St. Thomas Parishes; the Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs. 

The Council on Aging worked with the following agencies in 1981 to obtain services for our shut-ins; MinuteMan 
HomeCare Corp.; Stoneham Visiting Nurse Association; Community Teamwork, Inc.; Mystic Valley Mental Health; 
Wilmington Board of Health and surrounding Council on Agings. 

A monthly social was held by the Council on Aging to get the seniors out of their homes, joining them with 
other seniors in a social and enjoyable atmosphere. This therapeutic activity helped to keep many of our se- 
niors out of doctor offices and hospitals, with the year 1981 ending on a healthy and happy note for all our 
senior citizens. 



Redevelopment Authority 



The year 1981 saw a few changes in personnel on the Redevelopment Authority. Chairman Ray McNamara retired af- 
ter 14 years of dedicated service to the Board. Daniel Stewart resigned from his positon and his unexpired 
term was filled by former member, Sidney Kaizer. Jay Donovan was elected to a new five year term at the Annual 
Election. 

During 1981, land in the Jewel Park was sold to Vydel of New England, Inc., at a purchase price of $68,783.82. 
Currently, negotiations are progressing on the two remaining parcels in the park. One parcel to Altron, Inc., 
will give them the required parking area needed in order to construct a 45,000 square foot, 2-story addition 
to their existing facility. They estimate this will create approximately 600 new jobs — at least 100 of which 
would go to Wilmington people. 

The other parcel would house a 65,000 square foot, multi-tenant building. It is expected that the sales will 
be completed by the end of 1982. 

At the end of 1981 there were three businesses operating in the Jewel Park employing a total of 370 people. 
At this time, the assessed value of the park is $910,250 and the annual taxes to the town total $60,986.75. 



52 



Council for the Arts 



In early summer, 1980, the Wilmington Arts Lottery Council, a Selectmen's committee whose appointments were 
mandated by the State of Massachusetts, held its initial meeting in the Wilmington Memorial Library Conference 
Room. The purpose of the Council was to receive and disperse funds which were expected to be forthcoming from 
a statewide sale of Arts Lottery Game tickets. These tickets were sold on a monthly basis by the Massachusetts 
State Lottery Commission until July, 1981 

Along with over 300 other local arts councils, however, the Wilmington Arts Lottery Council received no funding 
whatsoever from the State. 

By a vote of the Council membership in April, 1981, the name of the Wilmington Arts Council was changed to the 
Wilmington Council for the Arts. The Council then proceeded without funding from any source to promote the 
creative work of local artists and craftsmen through a variety of activities and opportunities. 

Initially, a reception for Wilmington artists was held at Memorial Library in April. The work of those who 
participated as well as that of several other local artists was then presented at a very successful exhibition 
for the public held in May during the "Open House" for the new branch facility of the Reading Saving Bank on 
Main Street. 

Hoping to provide scholarship assistance and still unaware that State funding would not be forthcoming, the 
Council interviewed several high school seniors who planned to major in the Arts at the college level in the 
fall. 

In cooperation with the July 4th Celebrations Committee, the Arts Council produced the first outdoor art exhi- 
bition to be held in many years on the Town Common. More than fifty paintings by local people were exhibited 
on July 3. Award ribbons were presented for superior work in several categories and local craftsmen were en- 
couraged to display their work as well. The exhibition was received with enthusiasm and hopefully will be- 
come an annual event . 

In November with cooperation from the Historical Commission the Wilmington Council for the Arts instituted a 
program designed to promote the work of one or two local artists each month in a series of "one-man shows" 
which continue to be held on the first Sunday of each month at Harnden Tavern during regularly scheduled open- 
house hours. 

Especially with craftspeople in mind, the Council organized a Holiday Art and Crafts Sale which was held at 
Masonic Hall on Church Street in late November. 

An indoor-outdoor festival of the arts, expecially for the children and young people of the Town is planned 
for a weekend in May. 

Regardless of whether there is to be a revival of the Massachusetts Arts Lottery in the future, the member- 
ship of the Wilmington Council for the Arts feels a commitment to continue to support and provide encourage- 
ment for all local people who participate in the various areas of artistic endeavor, including the arts, the 
handcrafts, music and the theatre. 



53 



School Committee 



The School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1981. The membership 
of the committee is as follows: 

John D. Brooks, Chairperson 

Linda T. McMenimen, Vice Chairperson 

Bridget Zukas, Secretary 

James A. Demos 

Philip A. Fenton 

Lester E. White 

Wilmington opened its school classes this year on September 9, 1981, with a total enrollment of 3,864 down 208 
from last year's official enrollment of 4,072. The School Committee conducted 24 regular meetings, 

9 joint meetings with the Finance Committee 

and Selectmen, 
1 joint public budget meeting, 
1 special budget meeting (April 27, 1981), 
1 arbitration session, 
1 executive session budget meeting, 
1 meeting with town PACs, 

1 special meeting on closing the Swain, 

2 meetings regarding impact bargaining with WTA, 
1 Directors' collective bargaining, 

4 meetings to interview candidates, 

for a total of 46 meetings for the year 1981. Numerous other subcommittee meetings were held for the purpose 
of collective bargaining and study of school facilities. 

SCHOOL BUDGET 



1981 saw the implementation of the first school budget under Proposition 2 1/2. The school budget was reduced 
from $8,637,830 for 1980-81 to $7,702,895 for 1981-82. This was a decrease in the budget of $934,935. On top 
of this, additional cuts had to be made to offset $347,618 in contractual raises, and $150,000 for unemployment 
compensation. Thus, the total amount that had to be cut was $1,432,553. 

These reductions would have been worse (over $1.7 million) had it not been for the additional state aid appro- 
priated at the Special Town Meeting in September. With the $309,000 appropriated to the school budget at that 
meeting, the School Department was able to reduce elementary class size from an average of 29 pupils per class 
to an average of 25 pupils per class. 

1980-81 1981-82 Reduction 

Full-time 354 286 -68 -19% 

Part-time _52 _23 ^ -56% 

Total 406 309 -97 -24% 



54 



On the non-salary side, supplies and textbooks were reduced by -$136,204, a cut of 38%. Funds for library 
books were totally eliminated and audio-visual supplies were reduced by 53%. In addition, close to $40,000 in 
utilities was saved by the closing of three elementary buildings. 

The net effect on the School Tax Rate was a reduction from $53.37 to $41.11. When viewed as a percentage of the 
Total Tax Rate, the School Rate decreased from 66.3% to 61.4%. 

Within the School Tax Rate, however, are many costs which are not under the direct control of the School 
Committee. These items are the assessment for Shawsheen Tech, the Maintenance Department, and other school- 
related costs which appear in the town budget and not the school budget. 

Analyzing the School Tax Rate into these components, we see the following comparisons for 1980-81 and 1981-82: 



1980-81 1981-82 







School 
Tax Rate 


Percent of 
Total Rate 
of $80.50 


School 
Tax Rate 


Percent of 
Total Rate 
of $67.00 


A. 


School Budget 


$37.03 


46.0% 


$27.90 


41.6% 


B. 


School Related Costs 


4.40 


5.4% 


3.63 


5.4% 


C. 


Maintenance Department 


8.37 


10.4% 


6.93 


10.3% 


D. 


Shawsheen Tech 


3.61 


4.5% 


2.66 


4.0% 






$53.37 


66.3% 


$41.11 


61.4% 



STAFF RECRUITMENT 

The number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the number of positions available. Because 
of cutbacks in other systems, the school administration received many inquiries and applications of certified 
teaching personnel. 

ACCREDITATION 

The New England Association of Secondary Schools, Inc. extended the accreditation of Wilmington High School 
through 1982, This action was based on a three-day visit to the high school by members of the New England 
Association of Secondary Schools, Inc. and the resulting report. The report commended the high school for the 
diverse programs and dedicated staff members. However, the report was critical of the poor facilities and re- 
sulting health and safety conditions that exist. 

FACILITIES 

The task force established by the School Committee to address the High School space requirements also reviewed 
the recommendations made by the New England Association of Secondary Schools, Inc. Some of the specific areas 
of concern are the poor science and physical education facilities, inadequate library and safety issues in the 
shop. This report will be presented to the School Committee early in 1982. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE & RESIGNATIONS 

Requests for leaves of absence totaled 15 and were as follows: 

Graduate Study 3 
Illness 2 
Federal Grant 1 
Maternity __9 
15 



► 



Resignations totaled 20 as follows: 



Retirement 1 

Relocating 6 

Family Reasons 1 

Career Change 4 

Reduction in Force 7 

Teachers on Leave 1 



RETIREMENT 

Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Walter H. Pierce, retired from the Wilmington Public Schools in June of 1981 
after 25 years of dedicated service to the school system. Dr. Pierce began his career as a high school busines 
teacher at Wilmington High School in 1956. Subsequent positions in the system included an elementary principal 
ship and the Assistant Superintendency. He was appointed Superintendent of Schools in 1970. Dr. Pierce's 
tenure with the system was during a period of rapid growth and change. He was responsible for innovative pro- 
grams and exciting educational directions. His commitment to academic excellence and the children of Wilming- 
ton is much appreciated. 

DR. CAROL SAGER APPOINTED ACTING SUPERINTEN DENT O F SCHOOLS 

The School Committee named Dr. Carol Sager to the position of Acting Superintendent of Schools, thus filling 
the vacancy created when Dr. Walter H. Pierce retired in June. 

The Committee is grateful to the Town Officials, other Town Departments, and to the citizens of Wilmington for 
their excellent cooperation and assistance during the past year. 




Farewell gathering for former Superintendent of Schools, 
Walter Pierce 

56 



Superintendent of Schools 



I am pleased to submit the Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 1981. 
A review of the year's activities brings out the following highlights: 

BASIC SKILLS 

1981 was the second year of implementation of the Basic Skills Improvement policy as mandated by the Massachu- 
setts Department of Education. Students in grades 3, 6, and 8 were tested in the areas of reading, writing, 
and mathematics. A listening test program was developed and will be implemented during the spring of 1982. 

In the area of reading, 97% of all grade 3 and grade 6 students and 98% of the grade 8 students demonstrated 
achievement of minimum competency in reading. An individualized Basic Skills Reading Improvement Program has 
been established for students who did not meet minimal competency. 

Also, because of our cohesive program and objectives, Wilmington students performed well on the tests in Basic 
Skills in writing/language. Using the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in grade 3, 93% were judged to be minimally 
competent. A program of remediation is being conducted by teachers for these students who did not achieve the 
level of competency. In grade 6, writing was tested again by the Iowa Test of Basic Skills and 94% were judged 
to be minimally competent. 

A writing sample was the instrument to test students at the 8th grade level. After the samples were graded ho- 
listically, 82% were judged to be minimally competent. 

In mathematics, curriculum modification related to our Basic Skills Improvement Program include the establish- 
ment of remedial courses at the intermediate schools and a course, Basic Mathematics, at the high school. The 
goal of these offerings is to provide special help for students in essential math skills. 

The Basic Skills Advisory Committee in conjunction with the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce presented Basic 
Skills Awareness Day on September 24, 1981. Over 30 local businesses and community activities along with var- 
ious departments of the school system presented displays and programs that emphasized the need for competency 
in Basic Skills for success in all endeavors. Many students and members of the community enthusiastically 
participated in this successful event. 

GIFTED AND TALENTED PROGRAM 

The School Committee, on the recommendation of the School Administration, voted to continue its commitment to 
the gifted and talented program by assigning two full-time teaching positions as systemwide resource teachers. 
The Enterprise program encompasses qualified students in grades 4 through 8. 

The emphasis of the gifted and talented program for junior high students is twofold: 1) the development of 
independent study and research skills around problems of real interest to students, and 2) the effective use of 
mentors in the community. Wilmington's junior high program is associated with Merrimack Education Center's 
Title IV-C project. 

The gifted and talented students In the elementary grades participate in programs to increase their research 
and study skills, problem solving ability, and independent decision making. Higher level thinking skills such 
as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation are developed through exercises involving critical thinking, creativity, 
and scientific experimentation. 



57 



IN-SERVICE COMMISSION 



Under the direction of Dr. Carol Sager, Acting Superintendent of Schools, an In-Service Commission has been de- 
veloped for the purpose of planning, organizing, implementing and evaluating all staff development and in-ser- 
vice programs for the school department. The In-Service Commission, which is being co-chaired by Cleo Fredette, 
Jr., Director of Special Education and Dolores Silva, Principal of the Woburn Street School, is a broad based 
group involving central office personnel, principals, curriculum directors and representatives of the teacher's 
association. The purpose of the Commission is to develop meaningful staff development programs with as much 
input from all areas of the school department as possible. 

To date, the Commission has organized and presented a workshop by a noted Boston area psychiatrist to all pro- 
fessional staff dealing with the stresses of public education and Proposition 2 1/2. In the mid-winter months 
a series of workshops exploring reality therapy as an alternative to school discipline will be conducted at the 
Shawsheen and Woburn Street Schools. 

ART 

The Art Department is seeking innovative ways to expand opportunities available to students. 

At the elementary level they are experimenting with supplementary art instruction on Wednesday afternoons for 
artistically gifted students. This is done on a volunteer basis by the staff. They have formalized a plan for 
testing to begin identifying the visually gifted in grades 4, 5, and - in the hope of helping these students 
throughout their school years to develop their talents and to increase their awareness of the great many career 
opportunities which exist. 

With the help of parents the Art Department has been able to organize field trips to local art galleries that 
did not require money for transportation or teacher substitutes. 

CAREER AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

The Career and Occupational Education Department has been able to obtain monies from a federally funded program 
called Microcomputers in Business Education. This program supports a technology classroom program in the area 
of Business Math, Accounting, Typewriting, and Fundamentals of Business. It is essential that business students 
have an understanding of at least a minimal level of computer functions and operations. The impact of the com- 
puter on the business and industrial communities has generated a specific need for the career oriented student 
to understand and develop skills for processing data by means of electronics. 

Monies from another grant were designated to the Home Economics area at the intermediate grade level to provide 
supplies and materials for our "Everyday Living Program." With the increasing number of single-person house- 
holds, single-parent households and households with both husband and wife working, there is a great need for 
both boys and girls to learn the essential homemaking skills. Through proper instruction, students will gain 
skills in providing good nutrition for the family, caring for and providing clothing for the family, managing 
financial and energy sources, providing and maintaining satisfying living conditions and family relationships. 

The M.O.I.S. (Massachusetts Occupational Information System) which is still in operation provides occupational, 
education and financial data pertinent to a wealth of different jobs and careers. Job descriptions are contin- 
uously updated and cover many occupations. The printout tells what the job is, what a day's work is like, and 
what skills and training are required. It also gives information on starting salaries and the future outlook 
of the occupations. Our system hardware stays in the high school for two weeks. Then it goes to each of the 
intermediate schools for a week. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

A record number of seventh graders (ninety percent) are taking a course in either Exploratory French or Explor- 
atory Spanish. Both Exploratory courses are designed to allow students to discover their foreign language 
ability and interest. By beginning a foreign language in grade seven, students are then able to elect four to 
five full years of French or Spanish. Approximately one hundred and thirty students are enrolled in either a 
fourth or fifth year language course at the high school. More than sixty percent of all high school students 
are taking at least one foreign language course. French, German, Italian, Latin and Spanish are currently being 
offered at the high school. 



58 



During the month of October, we welcomed an exchange student, Felix Martin, from Madrid. ' ■ i. ■ oii>. i 
with the McNally family and visited Spanish classes at the high school and au both iv.* 
McNally, a junior, is going to Spain this summer and will stay with Felix's family. 

LANGUAGE ARTS/ENGLISH 

With the completion of the adoption of the Language Arts texts, LANGUAGE: SKILLS & US?! Gradt 1-6, all srude ■ - ■ 
in the system are participating in a program to develop and emphasize <?kills in the Lan;?uage. Arcs areas. 
Writing, spelling, vocabulary, grammar, usage, punctuation, capir.sIi:?ation, speaking snd li^iteni?-. 
the areas that are addressed by our Language Arts curriculum. Handwriting Instruction is being en.; 
throughout the system. Students in grades 1 through 3 are using the Scott, Foresman program calie,. . 
OUR LANGUAGE . In the third grade, students made the transition to cursive writing. In later gradus^ man:, 
opportunities are given for the practice of this important skill. 

A revision of the instructional objectives by intermediate English teachers war; made this pasr ysa " i.or 
emphasis has been placed on writing and literature in addition to the listening, speaking, language, anf st 
skills areas. A new program of Honors English has been offered at this level. The purpose of tbo 
to provide increased opportunities for creativity and to develop skills for the college bovind ;?r.f. 
tional objectives are added to the 8th grade curriculum. 

For the first time, students at the high school participated in the Advanced Placement Tesring Pr; 
position and Literature, and Language & Composition. Success in this exam makes possible college 
vanced standing or both. 87% of the students taking this competitive, difficult exam achieved the. pa? ■ 
grade, with many scoring much higher. 

A minimum of 50% of the instructional time of English teachers is devoted to improvinE s^iii in '■•'"iji-; 
least one weekly writing assignment continues to be a requirement for all courses. Wilmington 3tooon*:.= - 
received recognition for their writing skills with awards in statewide contests, 

I MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 

The Mathematics Department is witnessing rapid growth in interest in computer programming offerings a- 
school. Although our capacity for dealing with this expansion has been improved with the additio- 
microcomputers, facilities currently operate at full efficiency and future grov7th should be anti'- 

The Mathematics Honor Society is in its second year of operation at the high school. Its 65 members ,ad.;i 
perform the task of tutoring students in need and participate as well In field trips, contest?, a.id :l, - 
related activities. 

MUSIC 

The Music Department staff continues to work diligently at all levels to provide quality programs 
cation in which children will hopefully learn to appreciate and value their cultural musical heriLL.^:.- 

The High School marching band attended a successful summer camp on Bear Island, Meredith, New Hampshi 
marching and music skills for the upcoming football season were taught. 

The High School Winter Concert was a well attended, delightful evening of musit- and entertainment an- • 
enjoyed by all. The intermediate and elementary schools presented public performances during the inc^t'' 
December. There are future plans for a town-wide music and art festival in conjunction with the ' 
Arts Council. 

READING 

Reading Curriculum Guide 

A Reading Curriculum Guide for grades 7-12 was completed which provides content area teachers wit 
strategies for integrating instruction of basic reading skills into their content areas. Workshop- ' ■ - 
mentation of the guide were scheduled for teachers by the reading specialists assigned at tht? int-'..:- w - 
schools and the high school. 



Readi ng Scores Contlaue To Impro ve 



Test scores indicate that students in grades 1, 2, A, 5, 7, 9, and 10 continue to show gains in the area of 
vocabulary and comprehension development as measured by standardized tests. 

^BT'ri ce Grant 

r evali at. ui cf the In-Service Grant for a project to provide in-service assistance to content area teachers 
li? CE. schocls was commended by Dr Donald Landry, Project Consultant. As a result of this pro- 
ari bett^^r able to assess student hael't skill needs and to provide individual instruction based 
ctl specific needs. 

r-.Tjgram Continues In Wilmington 

. t:. I services were provided for approximately 140 students in grades 1 through 6. Elementary schools which 
liiiied for Title I funds were the Woburn Street School, Shawsheen School, Wildwood School and the Glen Road 
School. The Title I Parent Advisory Council held three successful systemwide meetings. This year marked the 
sixteenth year that Title I has been in existence and is the largest program authorized by the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act. 

SCIENCE/HelALTH EDUCATION 

Peer Teadershjp Grant Renewal 

The Science Department has received a renewal for Its Peer Leadership Smoking Grant from the Department of 
Pabllc Ilealth. The goal of chls program is to help students resist peer pressure to start smoking. Results of 
the effectiveness of the program will be forthcoming this year. 

ri geology and marine studies program will be reinstituted at the high school. We are stressing these "Earth 
Studies" programs as an important part of our total Science program in an effort to keep current with the de- 
mands and concerns in those specific fields. 

The astronomy course Is in its second year of operation and appears to be more popular than ever. A total of 
35 students are enrolled in this college level cou.rae. 

Several elementary teachers are presently piloting three elementary science programs. The science Curriculum 
Adoption Committee will make a recommendation to the School Committee as to its selection. The program to be 
adopted will be a blending of both a test approach and laboratory process approach. 

Health Education 

Qui K-8 Health Education is highly popular with students, teachers, and parents alike. More than ever, this 
program will begin stressing drugs, alcohol, and smoking education at the K-8 levels. 

The junior high program is now interpreted into the science curriculum. Health Education topics will be covere 
In depth as part of that program. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

An elementary committee has completed its work in reviewing elementary social studies materials and the program 
adopted is systemwide - The People & Their Heritage Series by Glnn & Company. The new program is adaptable to 
a wide spertrum of ability levels and provides continuity to the Social Studies curriculum. The content of the 
new program is more traditional in its approach and stresses basic citizenship skills mandated by the state. 

At the high school, students are continuing to volunteer and to participate in a government internship program 
sponsored and coordinated by Representative James Mlceli's office. The program Involves students in the follow- 
ing areas: (I) Constituent Services; (2) Hearings; (3) State Agencies; (4) Human Services Committee. Students 
will participate on an independent study basis. 



60 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Chapter 766, the State's Comprehensive Special Education Law, requires that the State Department of Education 
monitor and evaluate each school system to determine the degree of compliance with the law and special educa- 
tion regulations. In March, a team from the Massachusetts Department of Education, Division of Special Edu- 
cation came into the Wilmington Public School system to assess the level of compliance for the Wilmington 
Special Education Program, 

The Department of Education personnel reviewed seven aspects of the Special Education Program. They were: 
child identification activities, TEAM evaluation procedures and practices, special education and required 
treatment services, physical facilities, transportation services, personnel and personnel development, and 
finances . 

In all areas the Special Education Program was found to be in total compliance with all Chapi,-!. , regulations. 
The state personnel assessed 72 specific areas under the above categories, and the local Special Education Pro- 
gram received "exemplary" in 25 out of 72 areas. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Scholastic Achievement 

Recognizing outstanding students is an ongoing process at the High School. This past year nineteen (19) 
juniors and thirty-two (32) seniors were inducted into the National Honor Society. Many of these students pro- 
vided tutoring to other students as part of their service project. 

We are most pleased with the students who made the Honor Roll this past year. Worthy of special recognition 
are the 165 students who made it for all four quarters. Each of these students received a certificate. The 
thirty students who made the Honor Roll for two years received a Wilmington "W". Finally, the twenty-three 
students who have been on the Honor Roll for three years received a sweater with Wilmington High School embossed 
on it, as well as the lamp of learning. Students are proud of their accomplishments and wear them on Wildcat 
Day. 

National Merit Scholarships 

Each year the Educational Testing Service administers a test called the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test. 
From this test the National Merit Scholarships are determined. This past year Wilmington High School had its 
first finalist, Katherine M. Gillespie. Kathy was recognized for being one of the top 4,700 students in the 
nation and received the Colby, Maine College Merit Scholarship. Kathy, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carroll 
Gillespie, graduated in June, 1981. 

Guidance Department 

The guidance department consists of four guidance counselors who do academic and some personal counseling. 
Through a variety of evening programs, large groups of parents can learn more about the high school and planning 
for college. Among the most popular evening programs are those dealing with college admissions, financial aid, 
and high school course selection. This year the guidance counselors from the intermediate schools and high 
school are meeting monthly with a psychologist to discuss the problems their students are having. Among the 
topics raised are self-respect, depression, and the problems of single parenting. 

Advanced Placement Program 

Hard work resulted in thirteen students passing special tests that gave them college credit for their high 
school work. The students achieved college credit in U.S. History, English, Foreign Language or Calculus, by 
passing the Advanced Placement Program Tests. 



61 



STATUS OF THE CLASS OF 1981 



uon-st 'te colleges and universities 49 (16.9) 

To four year state colleges and universities 53 (18.3) 

To two year non-state colleges 6 ( 2.0) 

To two year state colleges 45 (15.5) 

To nursing fschools. - 3 ( 1.1) 

To other post high school education 12 ( 4.1) 

Total to further education 168 (57.9) 

To working forces 101 (34.9) 

To military service.... 9 ( 3.3) 

To marriage and work H ( 3.9) 

Total 289 (100%) 



.ioncius.on, L would like to take this opportunity to extend my appreciation to the School Committee, admin- 
rators, teachers, parents and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during 

198] school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that cooperated with the school 
;:em in 1981. 



Old Center School closed after 96 years of service 

62 



Shawsheen Regional Vocational/ 
Technical School Superintendent/ 

Director 



The year 1981 started with various actions taken by the School Committee in order to comply with the new 
Proposition 2 1/2. In order to keep our expenses to a minimum, economic measures were enacted by the School 
Committee. It was felt essential to have any supplementary programs be self-supporting. This would affect 
the adult education program, summer school and the afternoon program. The summer school program was limited 
to students from the five towns who were required to take make-up courses. The charges for these courses were 
such that they covered the salaries of the teachers as well as other costs and effected considerable savings 
over the previous year. The adult education program for the fall of 1981 generated a cost of $60.00 for a 
60 hour program with approximately 375 adults participating in a number of courses. The situation in adult 
education is that the residents of the five towns are appreciative of the need to economize and are willing 
to pay the cost of running these programs. 

BUDGET - In the spring, meetings were held with finance committees from various towns to discuss the upcoming 
Shawsheen Tech budget for the year 1981-82. Since this budget reflected a 15% cut over the previous year and, 
notwithstanding our enrollment was increasing, the situation caused a considerable challenge to the administra- 
tive staff to maintain the high quality of education. In line with the requirements of the legislative act, 
Proposition 2 1/2, the administration and the School Committee worked together in order to be certain that we 
would comply with the requirements. The budget was submitted to the five towns and since it reflected the 
cuts that were requested, the line item was approved at all town meetings. Preliminary discussions were held 
in the fall and early winter of this year for the upcoming budget for the school year 1982-83. The School 
Committee is cognizant of the fact that with increased numbers, it will be impossible to cut any staff. How- 
ever, we do anticipate that budget cuts will have to be made in order to conform to the guidelines that have 
been established. 

ENROLLMENT - September of this year saw an unusual situation due to the fact that we have absorbed the approxi- 
mately 160 students who were in the afternoon program this past year, as well as an additional 50 students in- 
to the incoming 9th grade. As a result, the population of the school is at the highest it has ever been, 1776 
students. Although this has resulted in every teaching station being filled in the shops and an increase in 
class size for the academic programs, our greatest concern was the fact that the school was not designed for 
that large number of students and there have been problems of overcrowded corridors during passing time between 
periods. This matter has been reviewed with both Captain Mason, the Safety Officer at the Billerica Fire 
department and the Building Inspector for the town of Billerica, Mr. McMahan. We hope to keep a close watch 
on this situation in order to protect the students from possible injury during the times that this overcrowded 
condition exists. In order to accommodate students in the classrooms, additional furniture was needed, most 
of which came from the local schools. 

BASIC SKILLS - In accordance with the state regulations, all 9th grade students were given the basic skills 
test with the following results: 78% of the students achieved minimum standard in reading; 85% in mathematics; 
94% in writing. The standards were established through a Basic Skills Committee that was foirmed to oversee 
the basic skills policy. 

GIFTED AND TALENTED - Since the inception of the school, we have always made provisions for those students who 
are categorized as Special Needs and may have some handicap to overcome. By contrast, we have also recognized 
the fact that above average students should be encouraged to fully utilize their abilities in every way possible. 
To expedite this, we have developed special programs that are intensive in nature and are designed for those 
high-ability students who plan to become technicians or go on to higher education. 

STUDENT PROJECTS - The students in the various departments of the school have engaged in remodeling projects 
that are beneficial to the respective towns and also provide good training to students in their specific skills. 
This year saw the completion of the remodeling of the administrative offices at the Center School in Burlington, 
installation of a new lavatory facility and building of a ramp for the handicapped at the Billerica Town Hall. 
The yearly house building project was unique in that the students under the direction of their instructors, 
built a specially designed solar house in Tewksbury. The house was completed in early summer and an open house 
was held in June which attracted some 1400 people. The various shops participating in the completion of this 
house included carpentry, masonry, plumbing, electrical and metal fabrication. 



63 



ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS - During the summer we started the first programs especially designed for adults. 
Project Summer was designed for training adults iii the areas of word processing and as computer data entry 
operators. Project PAT was designed to train unemployed adults in office practices consisting of shorthand, 
accounting, typing and office machines. Project CAP is a computer application program held for six months to 
train COBOL Programmers. This project was designed especially for those teachers and municipal employees who 
lost their jobs. 

OPERATING EFFICIENCY - Two major factors have been identified with improving the operating efficiency of the 
school: Computerized control of energy became operational in February, This system consists of a number of 
sensors located around the building which direct the signals to the computer controlling the heating system. 
Secondly, an updated telephone system has been installed which makes it possible to more closely monitor all 
calls being made within the school. At present we are developing plans for a Copy Center in the area adjoin- 
ing the Graphic Arts Department. This center would be operated by personnel from the Graphic Arts Department 
and will help teachers in making the material available which they require as part of their teaching program. 
It is hopeful that early next year this center will become operational. 

CHAPTER 74 EVALUATION - Early this year we were visited by Mr. Ghernot Knox and Mr. Joseph DeRosa, Supervisors 
from the State Division of Occupational Education. They made a complete evaluation of the school. The 
evaluators recommended that all of the programs be given continued approval. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEES - Both the General Advisory Committee, which represents a cross-section of residents of 
the five towns, and the Craft Advisory Committee, which is made up of individuals who are experts in their 
respective areas, met at various times during the year and provided valuable recommendations for the maintain- 
ing of the high standards of quality in vocational education. 

GRADUATION - Graduation was held this year on June 6 at the Shriners Auditorium in Wilmington. There were 
375 seniors who graduated, almost all went to work in their respective skills. The 1981 graduating class 
had a total earning capacity of almost three million dollars which will be infused back into the local 
communities . 

This year has seen an increased concern on the part of training and retraining adults in various vocational 
programs and the increased interest on the part of high school students to attend Shawsheen Tech. At no time 
since the opening of the school have we been able to accommodate all the students who have applied to this 
school. Although some of the towns have shown a loss of students, the interest in Shawsheen Tech has been 
consistently high. This is understandable since the placement record of our graduates and the reputation that 
Shawsheen Tech has established with business and industry has been of the highest quality. Notwithstanding 
the overcrowded conditions and the cuts made due to the economy, all of us on the staff at Shawsheen Tech 
feel this is a challenge to continue in every way to make Shawsheen Tech operate as successfully as it has beer 
in the past. 

LOOKING AHEAD - We find that, with the establishment of the Lahey Clinic, the expansion of facilities by 
Computervision, Micro-Wave Associates and GCA, and others, and the proposed new facility of the Boston Globe, 
building of three large R&D establishments on the corner of Cook Street and Boston Road, and additional 
electronic facilities to be built on nearby Alexander Road, Indications are that the future for Shawsheen Tech 
and its involvement with new and expanding industries has become more and m ire significant. 



64 



Shawsheen Regional Vocational/ 
Technical School Committee 



Elected Representatives of the School Committee are: 



Bedford 



Tewksbury 



Anthony R. Mazzone 

Joseph L. Rogers, Chairman 



Richard E. Griffin 
Wilson E. Brazile 



Billerica 



Wilmington 



Kenneth L. Buffum 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Bernard Hoar 



Lawrence P. Flaherty 

Vice Chairman 
Frank McLean 



Burlington 



John G. Murphy 
John P. Miller 



Carolyn W. Broderick 
Executive Secretary 



Regular meetings of the Regional School Committee were held the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. 
Special meetings were called by the Chairman as the need arose. The time and place of all meetings are duly 
posted by the District Town Clerks at least forty-eight hours in advance. Unless otherwise noted, the meet- 
ings are held at the school facility located at 100 Cook Street, Billerica. These meetings are open to the 
public, and residents of the District are welcome to attend. 

It was a pleasure serving again as Chairman of the Shawsheen Valley Regional School Committee. It was a busy 
year for the Committee, and as Chairman, I would like to relate to you some of the issues we had to face. 

Shawsheen has taken the 2 1/2 situation in stride by making adjustments in its operation. The ASTP Program 
(afternoon program) was cancelled for the school year 1981-82 due to Proposition 2 1/2. These students were 
accepted into the regular day program. This did pose some overcrowding in the beginning of the school year, 
but is has worked out and things are running smoothly. 160 students were involved in this transition. 

Adult Education was tried on a self-supporing basis with 400 adults participating. It has become another 
success story, offering 23 different programs four evenings a week. The most popular are Word Processing, 
Automotive, Masonry, Data Processing and Medical Assistant. 

In recognition of the needs of business and industries, our Area Coordinator, in his fourth year, developed 
an Electronics Technicians Computer Operators Training Program (ETCO) at no cost to the District due to a 
Federal Grant. Also, Project PAT, Placement, Assessment and Testing, assisted area residents in finding 
employment. The eight week course provided training in shorthand, filing, accounting, and word processing. 
Every effort is being made to offer retraining programs to adults who, for one reason or another, have lost 
employment . 

Family Swim Programs are offered to the five sending towns on Monday througn Friday evenings from 8:00 p.m. to 
9:30 p.m. Throughout the year at a minimal cost, swimming lessons were also offered, as was the Red Cross 
Safety Instructors' course. 

Since no money was provided for the operation of summer school, this program was also made self-sustaining. 
Make-up by students, being necessary at times, lent merit to this program. Summer school ran for six wepks 
and a Vocational Introductory Program was also offered for special need students during this period. 

Graduation was held in the Shriners' Auditorium again this year to a packed house. The guest speaker was 
Channel 5's Meteorologist, Dick Albert. A large number of students received awards and scholarships for 
further education. 



65 



The Student Advisory Committee met with the School Committee throughout the year and made meaningful contri- 
butions to the operation of the school, for which the Committee was grateful. Each year a Red Cross Blood- 
mobile is sponsored by the Student Council as well as numberous other worthwhile projects. The students also 
took 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes at a State-wide VICA competition. 

The Boss System, a means of controlling operational costs, is in full service and beginning to show results. 

The first Solar House building project was undertaken this past year involving 90 students of the District - 
another success story of which they can be proud. The students also erected ramps for the physically handi- 
capped and numerous other projects throughout the communities. 

To keep abreast with industry, the School Committee saw it necessary to upgrade areas within the school such 
as the Computer Shop with the addition of Word Processing equipment and a new DEC 20 computer. The Machine 
Shop and Electronics Shop were also revamped. 

Twice in the past year it became necessary to honor a Fuel Adjustment request from the SVT Bus Service, Inc. 
Recently we have been reviewing the budget for the coming year, with a "no increase" theme. The Public Hearing 
and acceptance of the budget will take place in January of 1982. 

To the District Towns we offer our gratitude for their assistance and support, without which we could not 
survive. The School Committee expresses its thanks to the faculty and staff of the Shawsheen Valley Technical 
High School for their cooperation throughout the year, and to the student body for their continuing effort in 
making Shawsheen the number one school in the country. Last but not least, to the School Committee members, 
my co-workers, for their assistance to me throughout the past year, a grateful Thank You. 



Housing Rehabilitation Program 



The Town of Wilmington conducted a highly successful neighborhood rehabilitation program. It was funded by 
a $245,000 HUD Community Development Block Grant. The program provided the ne essary financial assistance 
to substandard housing conditions in the Silver Lake target area. Thirty-five households of low and moderate 
income directly benefited. Fifty-four percent of these households were headed by females. 

HUD did not approve the Town's application to continue the program; therefore, it was terminated in 
September, 1981. 



66 



Recreation Commission 



The Recreation Department experienced a 57% cut in appropriations for 1981/82 due to the passage of Proposition 
2 1/2. This mandate speeded up the process of utilizing alternative funding sources for recreation programs. 
Increased emphasis is being put upon volunteerism, fund raising, increased user fees, civic and fraternal 
group donations plus assistance from local business and industry. Since all of these efforts were already in 
practice the impact of 2 1/2 was not as severe as it might have been. 

People everywhere are even more in need of activities that present a challenge, an opportunity for accomplish- 
ment, satisfaction or just plain fun. With this need in mind, the Wilmington Recreation Department continues 
to deliver a program of constructive and diverse recreation activities to the community with minimal impact 
upon local taxes. 

The following departmental objectives guide us in our efforts: 

To provide opportunities for self expression 
To develop a sense of personal worth 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of 

challenge to participants 
To teach skills in various activities that will have carry over value in later life 
To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an attempt to 

meet the needs and interests of the people being served 

The Recreation Department, in its eleventh year with a full-time director, presents the following information 
on 1981 programs and activities: 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Summer Playgrounds : The playground program ran for 6 1/2 weeks at the High School. Children who completed 
grade 1 through 6 were eligible for this Monday through Friday program. The playground was open from 9:00 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. Two leaders with young CETA helpers supervised the program. Activities that were part of the 
program included arts and crafts, quiet games, tournaments, active sports and special events. These special 
events included the Police Association Soap Box Derby and their Beach Day, Penny Carnival (proceeds went to the 
Jimmy Fund), Canoble Lake field trip. Red Sox Trip, K of C Olympics, and the Sand Castle competition at 
Crane's Beach. 

Tiny Tots : The Recreation Department housed this extremely popular and successful summer, pre-school enrich- 
ment program at the public library. This cooperative relocation effort only seemed to improve the experience 
each child received. There were two three-week sessions that ran Monday through Friday. The morning class 
consisted of four year olds and the afternoon class consisted of five year olds. There were two staff members 
along with seven CETA helpers and volunteers. The repertoire of activities Included: songs, games, movies, 
stories, arts and crafts, library hours and special trips to the Boston Children's Museum and the Swan Boats. 
There was also a T-shirt Day, Doggie Day, Dinosaur Day, Circus Day and Hawaiian Luau Day. Each session ended 
with parents and friends attending a very special Graduation Ceremony and Party. 

Special Needs : Our summer program for local youngsters with a special need was held again at Camp AO Acres. 
Over forty boys and girls benefited by this unique and extremely beneficial recreation program. The children 
were? bused to the Camp and back to the High School each day Monday through Friday for the 6 1/2 week schedule. 
Payment for the bus was made from donations. There were nine staff members, several CETA youth workers and 
some volunteers. Included in the program was arts and crafts, music, quiet games, active games, pool days, 
overnights, cookouts and field trips. The Elks sponsored the Annual Superstars Day where many surrounding 
towns and cities took part in our mini-special Olympics. The Sons of Italy helped with the awards supper. 
The Public Buildings Department employees gave a special cookout extravaganza at the Camp. Game World helped 



67 



Teens ; Special event trips for teens included Hampton Beach, Salisbury Beach, Red Sox and Cranes Beach. A 
rock concert was held on the Common on Sunday, July 12. 



Baseball : This team is for boys ages 16 to 18. They play in the Northeast League during June and July. Abe 
18 boys participated. They played home games on the varsity field on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday evenings. 
Nature Food Centres, participation fees and passing the hat helped support the team in its 9th year. 

Girls Softball : There were 6 teams in the intra-town league. Each team consisted of 15-18 girls who were be 
tween the ages of 13 and 17. Each team played a 15 game schedule at the Town Park and Swain School. Their 
season ran from early June through most of August. Concluding the season was a tournament for the top four 
teams. 

The traveling all star team consisted of 18 girls. They played in the 14 team Middle Essex League. Their 
schedule consisted of 14 games. Their season ran from late June through mid-August followed by a league all- 
star game and playoffs. 

Boys Softball : This is an intra-town program for boys ages 13 to 17. The 1-pitch league consisted of 6 team 
of 15 boys each. They played their 14 game schedule on Saturdays and Sundays beginning early May and running 
through June. Games were played on the J.V. field. A single elimination tourney involving the top 4 teams 
concluded the season. 

Town Beach : Lifeguard protection had to be reduced due to shortage of funds. The number of days that the 
beach was open had to be reduced and the daily hours had to be reduced. This is unfortunate because many 
residents of all ages use this extremely valuable natural recreation asset. The beach was open seven days a 
week from June 27 to August 23. 

Swimming Lessons : There was an extensive summer program at Silver Lake and a school year program at 
Shawsheen Tech. The summer program registered hundreds of local youngsters ages 6 and up in Red Cross prograir 
such as: beginner, advanced beginner, intermediate, basic water safety, distance swimming and advanced life 
saving. The basic courses ran on a Monday through Friday basis for two-week sessions. The program ran for 
the month of July and August. There were two instructors and several helpful aides. The head instructor al? 
taught CPR and recertified lifeguards. This program may be our most valuable of all. 

The school year program ran at Shawsheen Tech on Sundays throughout most of the school year. There were youth 
lessons and family/adult swim time available for local residents. 

Canoeing : The Recreation Director and a local boy scout troop conducted a clean up of the perimeter of Silver 
Lake from canoes. This was accomplished on May 16. The Director taught the group in the basics of canoe 
safety and skills after the clean up took place. 

Canoe lessons were conducted at Silver Lake during August. Many girl scouts took advantage of this opportunit 
in anticipation of a troop canoe trip in New Hampshire. 

Town Canoes, used In the lessons, were also available for rental on Silver Lake during beach opening hours. 

Sailing Clinic : There was both a sailing and canoeing clinic held at Silver Lake on Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings, June 2 and 4. Many people of varying ages gained much valuable knowledge in these aquatic pursuits!. 

Soccer : There was both an intra-town program and a traveling team program. 

The intra-town league ran on Saturdays from early September to early November. Over 250 boys and girls in 
grades 1 to 6 participated. This program was well managed by a group of dedicated parents. These coaches and 
managers stressed team play and basic skills. 

The traveling teams played in the Middlesex Youth Soccer League. 

There was a team for boys under sixteen and a team for boys under fourteen. They played on Saturday and Sunda 
from mid-April to mid-June behind the Shawsheen School. 

Tennis Lessons : The spring lessons were he]d on Saturday for five weeks at the Woburn Street School. Partlrl 
pants ranged in age from 9 to 16. There was also an adult clajis. The four one-hour classes met from late Mav 
to mid-July. The five-week summer session consisted of two youth cl^isses. 

An inst;.ructional clinic was held on Sent. 26 for those wishing to learn a few basics In a short period of time 



68 



Fun Runs : These monthly events were held on the first Saturday of each month from May through November. 
Starting time was 10:30 a.m. at the Common. They were held at no charge other than a one dollar adult fee 
which was returned to the joggers in the form of prize drawings. The races were informal in nature and were 
open to anyone. Ages nine and up participated. 

Ski Lessons : This popular program for grades 4 to 6 were held for five Wednesday afternoons in January. The 
boys and girls learned the basics in a very popular winter sport. Over fifty downhillers enjoyed the program. 

Santa's Workshop : About 400 little boys and girls came to see Santa and his busy elves. Sweetheart Plastics 
financed this very popular special. Each child received a free color snapshot with Santa, a candy cane, a 
helium filled Christmas balloon and other assorted items. The program was held on a Sunday afternoon and on 
the following Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. 

Gymnastics : There was a spring and fall program for boys and girls ages four through high school. The spring 
program was held for five Saturdays in the High School Gym. There were four classes for girls that began in 
mid-April. The fall program ran for ten Saturdays included boys. It bagan on September 26. Basic tumbling, 
exercises, games and beam work was stressed. 

Baton : The 10 week winter program included four classes that met in the High School on Saturdays beginning 
January 17. There were also four classes in the five-week spring program that began on April 18. Many of our 
twirlers marched as a unit in the Patriots Day Parade in Lexington and other area parades. Their group pic- 
ture even appeared in a national baton magazine. The fall program began on September 26. It consisted of 
four glasses. The program ran for ten weeks. 

Ballet : The winter program ran for ten weeks on Tuesday afternoons at the Glen Road School. There were two 
classes which met for an hour each. Basic routines were taught. Participants began to develop poise, confi- 
dence and a sense of gracefulness. The spring program was run in the High School Gym for five Saturdays. It 
began on April 11. There were three classes. The fall program consisted of three classes that met for ten 
weeks in the High School Gym. This program began on September 26. 

Others : Some other programs we ran or helped run were: basketball clinics, track clinics, memorial races, 
ski trips, snorkeling clinic, scuba lessons, ice follies trip, public skating, junior winter carnival, special 
childrens Valentines party sponsored by the Rotary Club, Rotary basketball shootout, K of C foul shooting 
contest, Red Cross Swim-a-Cross , Wilmington roller skating parties, basketball dances, special childrens 
Easter Egg Hunt sponsored by the Rotary Club, Easter Egg Hunt, horribles parade sponsored by Kiwanis, Town 
Employees, Police Association and Rotary; put, pass and kick sponsored by Rotary, Boston Pops trip, Sturbridge 
Village trip, Edaville Railroad Christmas trip, jogging clinics, Boston Harbor cruise, Barnum and Bailey Circus 
trip and the special childrens Christmas party sponsored by Rotary and Sons of Italy. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 



Mens Basketball : This competitive league consisted of nine teams. They played their fifteen-game schedule 
on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday in the High School Gym. The program ran through March 26. 

Mens Gym Night : Each Thursday evening from December through March men played basketball on an informal manner. 
This program ran out of the West Intermediate Gym. 

Universal : The ten-week winter program ran on Monday and Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8 p.m. in the High 
School. Many ladies enjoyed the novelty and healthful benefits of the Rotary Club donated Universal Exercise 
tochine. The program ended on April 1. The fall program ran on Monday and Thursday evenings from 7 to 8 p.m. 
Ladles and men both enjoyed this ten-week program that began on September 28. 

ioga : This healthf ul/relaxf ul program ran for ten weeks in the winter. There was a beginner and advanced 
:lass which met on Tuesdays at the Glen Road School. 

^adies Slimnastics : The ten-week winter program met on Monday and Wednesday evenings at the West Intermediate 
lym. This popular program concluded its winter session on April 1. The ten-week fall program began on 
Jeptember 28. 

Aerobics : This ladies exercise program also operates out of the West Intermediate Gym for ten weeks on Mondav 
ind Wednesday evenings. It begins shortly after the slimnastics class vacates the gym. 

' loncerts : The Recreation Departments "Sounds of Summer" concert program included seven evening concerts on the 

69 



Concerts : (continued) 

Common. The first concert was on June 9. The last concert was held on August 18. Sponsoring concerts were 
Compugraphic, F & R Auto Supply, Kiwanis, Charles River Breeding Labs, Chamber of Commerce and W.G. Leavitt 
and Sons, Insurance. 

Co-ed Volleyball : This adult program was held on Thursday evenings in the North Intermediate Gym for ten 
weeks beginning January. Play was informal and enjoyed by both the ladies and the men. 

Others : Other adult programs that the Recreation Department was involved in were: X-country ski clinic at 
Ski Haus, ski trips, swimming and beach use, canoe lessons and clinics, sailing clinic, tennis lessons, joggingi' 
clinics, police and town races, fun runs, scuba, snorkeling, yoga and stretching clinic, memorial races, 
Bruins tickets, B.U. football tickets, public skating and several field trips. 

Members of the Recreation Commission successfully managed the men's softball league and July Ath activities. 

The Recreation Department and Commission wish to give thanks for the extensive involvement of volunteers and 
the valuable contributions from business, industry and civic/fraternal groups. They all play an increasingly 
important role in Wilmington's Recreation Program. 




Silver Lake Beach 



70 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



Adams Street 
Adelaide Street 
Agostlno Drive 
Aldrich Road 
Allen Park Drive 
Andover Street 
Andover Street 
Anthony Avenue 
Apollo Drive 
Arlene Avenue 
Auburn Avenue 
Ayotte Street 



from Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 
from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
from Gandalf Way 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
from Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 
from Salem Street 

from Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 

from Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 

from Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 

from Salem Street to Ella Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 



2,915 
666 
999 

6,740 

2,319 
180 
11,300 
300 
300 

3,754 
755 
240 



1908 
1976 
1979 
1894 
1971 
1894 
1894 
1966 
1971 
1966 
1945 
1947 



1970 



1978 



Baker Street 
Baland Road 
Ballardvale Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Bancroft Street 
Barbara Avenue 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Beeching Avenue 
Belmont Avenue 
Benson Road 
Biggar Avenue 
Birchwood Road 
Birchwood Road 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Burnap Street 
Burnap Street 
Burt Road 
Butters Row 
Buzzell Drive 

Canal Street 
Carolyn Road 
Carson Avenue 
Carter Lane 
Catherine Avenue 
Cedar Street 
Cedar Crest Road 
Central Street 
Chandler Road 



from Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 684 

from Ballardvale Street 540 

from Salem Street to Route 125 965 

from Route 125 to Andover Line 12,000 

from Liberty Street 400 

from Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 850 

from Church Street to Belmont Avenue 970 

from Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 1,005 

from Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 440 

from Columbia Street to State Street 980 

from Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 616 

from Salem Street to King Avenue 1,282 

from Shady Lane Drive 1,197 

from Judith Road 400 

from Bulington Avenue to Aldrich Road 4,144 

from Bridge Lane 510 

from Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 950 

from Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 1,066 

from Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 1,017 

from Shawsheen Avenue 455 

from Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 754 

from King Street 1,377 

from Main Street to Burlington Line 8,588 

from Grove Avenue 1,145 

from Winchell Road 484 

from Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 1,653 

from Main Street to Chestnut Street 3,577 

from Draper Drive to Evans Drive 600 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 1,505 

from North Street to Marcia Road 1,268 

from Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 1,017 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 1,411 

from Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 1,000 

from Burt Road to Harris Street 687 

from Pinewood Road to Judith Road 1,100 

from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 552 

from Adams Street to Kelley Road 400 



1945 
1972 
1894 
1894 
1952 
1966 
1915 
1947 
1959 
1933 
1971 
1975 
1952 
1953 
1894 
1933 
1933 
1945 
1938 
1894 
1894 
1954 
1894 
1953 
1945 
1945 
1894 
1971 

1939 
1960 
1961 
1957 
1966 
1945 
1963 
1950 
1957 



1960 
1943 
1943 



1971 



1946 



1955 
1971 



71 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1 7 


1951 


1971 


L.nar lo tee Koaa 


from 


Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 


Q i:q 


19 /I 




Chnse Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


1 


into 
lyi J 




Uiies cnuu o treec 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11 /. Qn 
li , 'toU 


loy^ 




unurcn ocreeu 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


^ , loj 


1 QQ /. 




UXBr K o Lree L 


f r om 


naxn otreet to unurcn otreeu 






ly by 


Lionnaa Koaa 


from 


Agostino Drive 


Q Q 7 


1 Q 7Q 

19 /y 




Cochirane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


Hon 
oUU 


1 0/. 7 

ly't / 




Columbia Street 


from 


Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1 1 ^(\ 


1 on Q 

lyuo 


ly _} J 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


J , oU J 


loy^ 




Congress Street 


f r om 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


O 7 7 


1 Q Q Q 

ly jy 




Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


Q 1 T 






Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


7 


1 Q 1 

ly ji 




Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 




Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 




Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


J jO 


1 QA 7 

ly^ / 




Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


(^Q 7 


1 QQ A 




Cunningham Street 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 




1 QAA 
X y 4 '4 


1 Q 1^ T 

ly J J 


Cypress Street 


from 


(jien Koaa 


7^in 


1 O ^ 1 

±y J i 




Dadant Drive 


I r om 


LNortn otreet to iNortn street 


1 7An 


ly 04 




Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


jUU 


lyjz 




Dayton Road 


f rom 


Hathaway Road 


1 7n 


ly jx 




ueii urive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


J- , / y^ 


1 Q ^ft 


17/1 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 




1 07 Q 

X y / y 




Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1 /.no 


ly J4 




Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 




Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


i , 3bU 


1 Q 1^ Q 

ly jy 


1 Q 7 1 

ly /I 


Drury Lane 


from 


bien Koaa to bcnooi otreet 


O J J 


1 Q A T 

ly o J 




Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


3UU 


1 Q ^ 1 

ly ji 




Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 




ly jtj 




Eames Street 


I rom 


Main Street to Woburn Street 


J , zuu 


itty 4 




Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 


/■ t^O 


1 Q/. 7 

ly 'J / 




Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,043 


1978 




Elwood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 




Emerson Street 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


QQ O 


i y J i 




Englewood Drive 


from 


Kenwood Drive 


^DD 


1 Q 71 

xy / i 




Evans Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


9 07 1 


1 Q 7 1 

1 y / 1 




Everett Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 


/■ RO 


1 Q 7 Q 

ly / y 




Fairfield Road 


from 


Main Street 


1 9QQ 


1 Q A A 

i y 4o 




Fairmeadow Road 


from 


Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


9 1 9 Q 


1 R Q 

xy JO 




Fairmont Avenue 


from 


Malloy Road 


y jz 


1 Q7 1 

xy / X 




Fairview Avenue 


from 


otate btreet 


A/i P 

u 


1 Q 7 

1 y J J 




Faneuil Drive 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Harvard Ave. 


7 Q A 

/ yu 


ly DU 




Faulkner Avenue 


from 


Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


X , y^D 


xy44 


1 Q ^ 7 

1 7 J J 


Fay Street 


from 


Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


71/, 


1 Q 9R 

xy 30 


1 Q A 

1 74 3 


Federal Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


7 /i O 


1 RQA 

X oy 4 




Ferguson Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1 07 


1 Q A 7 

lyo / 




Fletcher Lane 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


7Q 9 

/ y z 


1 Q 7 7 

xy / / 




Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 




Fordham Road 


from 


North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 




Forest Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


/, 1 on 


X oy 4 


1976 


Franklin Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1 1Q 

1 jy 


1 Q 7ft 

i y / o 




Frederick Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


1,070 


I9ft6 




Freeport Drive 


from 


Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


2,086 


1979 




Gandalf Way 


from 


Glen Road to Agostino Drive 


549 


1979 




Glen Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 





72 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



Glendale Circle 


from 


Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1,304 


1952 


Glenview Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 


Gowing Road 


from 


Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 


Grace Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 


2,514 


1966 


Grand Street 


from 


Corey Avenue 


815 


1952 


Grant Street 


from 


Federal Street 


780 


1943 


Grove Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Lake Street 


4,147 


1910 


Grove Street 


from 


Reading Line 


120 


1957 


Gunderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1,506 


1959 


Hamlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 


540 


1962 


Hanson Road 


from 


Woodland Road 


838 


1969 


Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1951 


Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 


Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1,312 


1971 


Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 


Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 


Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 










1971 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1956 


Heather Drive 


from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1,286 


1979 


High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3, 585 


1894 


Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


1914 


Hilltop Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1959 


Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1,560 


1945 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,051 


1894 


Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 


Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,398 


1938 


Jere Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1,248 


1968 


Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


1940 


Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 


Kelley Road 


from 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 


Kendall Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1,420 


1945 


Kenwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 


1,725 


1970 


Kiernan Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1958 


Kilmarnock Street 


from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1,840 


1894 


King Street 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2,400 


1940 


King Street Ext. 


from 


Glen Road 


487 


1979 


Kirk Street 


from 


Main Street 


575 


1951 


Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 


Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 


Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 


Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 


Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 


Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 


Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningslde Drive 


714 


1974 


Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 


Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 


Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,050 


1951 


Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 


Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 


Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 


Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 


1894 


Lowell Street Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1979 



1966 



1953 1959 



1951 
1972 



1949 



1952 
1975 



1951 



1971 



1945 



1978 
1957 



1Q5R 



73 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATES (s) ACCEPTED 



Mackey Road 
Magazine Road 
Magazine Street 
Main Street 
Marcia Road 
Marcus Road 
Marie Drive 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Avenue 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Melody Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 
Miller Road 
Moore Street 
Morgan Road 
Morningside Drive 
Morse Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Nassau Avenue 
Nathan Road 
Nichols Street 
Nickerson Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
North Street 
North Washington Ave. 
Nunn Road 

Oak Street 
Oakdale Road 
Oakridge Circle 
Oakwood Road 
Olson Street 



from Federal Street 

from Wisser Street 

from Taplin Avenue 

from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 

from North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 

from Cowing Road 

from Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 
from Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 
from Main Street 

from Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 

from Salem Street 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 

from Main Street to Salem Street 

from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 

from Glen Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Ave. 
from Kilmarnock Street 

from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 
from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 
from Middlesex Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 
from Senpek Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
from West Street 

from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 
from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 
from Agostino Drive 
from Kelley Road 

from Salem Street 

from Short Street to Judith Road 

from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 

from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 

from Church Street 



250 
320 

190 
21,387 
2,806 
2,315 
1,525 
1,876 
1,392 
810 
2,621 
364 
245 
12,140 
380 
638 
1,528 
653 
693 
1,360 
598 

1,566 
1,057 
3,801 
953 
537 
3,515 
858 
214 

355 

2,301 
1,730 
800 
122 



1943 
1973 
1973 
1894 
1962 
1958 
1961 
1945 
1951 
1945 
1944 
1957 
1966 
1894 
1945 
1945 
1967 
1977 
1974 
1939 
1908 

1946 
1971 
1894 
1947 
1954 
1945 
1979 
1965 

1951 
1950 
1958 
1946 
1957 



1971 



1966 



Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Plneridge Road 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Pleasant Road 
Powder House Circle 
Presidential Drive 
Progress Way 

Radcliff Road 
Railroad Avenue 
Reading Avenue 
Redwood Terrace 
Reed Street 
Richmond Street 
Ridge Road 
Ring Avenue 
River Street 



from Woburn Street to North Reading Line 
from Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 
from Dell Drive 
from Federal Street 

from Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 

from Hathaway Road 

from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 

from North Street to Linda Road 

from Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 

from Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 

from Middlesex Avenue 

from Boutwell Street 

from Industrial Way 

from South Street to Benson Road 
from Clark Street 
from Oakwood Road 
from Kenwood Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 

from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 

from Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 



4,180 

2,000 
595 
720 

1,519 
954 
380 
914 
450 

1,364 
750 
710 
826 
630 

355 
650 

215 

645 
1,090 
1,800 

365 
1,150 

453 



1895 
1907 
1958 
1943 
1946 
1959 
1945 
1960 
1953 
1954 
1962 
1954 
1977 
1974 

1971 
1909 
1979 
1970 
1971 
1973 
1956 
1975 
1962 



1919 



1954 



1981 



74 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE 



Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1,861 


1967 


Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 


Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,3A3 


1958 


Royal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale St.. 


8,a95 


'jV)'- 


Salem Street 


from 


North Rtiading ^ine to beyoiid V/oburn St. 


6,475 


18S4 


Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


School Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Sewell Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richard St. to Billerica Line 


11,845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 


Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hatha^vay Road 


1,021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


Silver Lake Avenue 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


Sparhawk Drive 


from 


Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 


Sprucewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from 


Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 


S trout Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street 


908 


1955 


Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 


Swain Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


Taft Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1<j38 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Temple Street 


J rem 


Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 


Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from 


North Reading Line to North Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


f rom 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


7C': 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


/•60 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 



75 



Towzi Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 18, 1981 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



■ ... EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

jREEXINGS ; In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
saia Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday the eighteenth day of April, A,D. 1981 at 
i-A5 o'clofk in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the 
.-lection of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE I. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for tVie following named offices, to wit:. 
Two Selectmen for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the 
School Comrriittee for the term of three years; One member of the Housing Authority for the term of five 
^^ears ; One member of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of five years. 

QUESTION No. 1. Shall the Town vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule Proceedures Act, Chapter 592 
of Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of Wilmington" 
by cnsnging the date under Section 17, from the twentieth day of December to Ninety (90) days prior to the 
Annual Town Meeting summarized below? 

Yes 

No 



SUMMARY : 

Chapter 17 of the Town Charter currently requires the Town Manager to submit his budget to the members of the 
Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee on or before December twentieth of each year. This proposed amend- 
ment to the Charter would extend the time of submission of the budget to ninety (90) days before the Annual 
Town Meeting presently held on the fourth Saturday of April. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium Church Street in said town of Wilmington, on Saturday the 
Twenty-fifth day of April, A.D. 1981 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan 
at 9:50 a.m. and as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. William Russell 
it was seconded and voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and voter identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 

The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by the Moderator, John M. Callan. 



76 



At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the printer packs were removed from the back of the voting 
nachlnes and one copy was given to the tally clerks, one was posted outside the railing so that each candidate 
could add up his own totals at once. There were forty-one (41) absentee ballots cast which were added to the 
machine totals. 

The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 9:00 p.m. 

All the totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for two) 

Elected Aldo A, Caira, 188 Chestnut Street 1364 
Elected Rocco V. DePasquale, 45 Adams Street 1427 
M. Barbara Sullivan, 27 Gunderson Road 786 
Blanks 555 

4132 

MODERATOR - One year (Vote for one) 

Elected John M, Callan, 571 Woburn Street 1539 
Blanks 527 

2066 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for two) 

Elected Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 69 Butters Row 1254 
Elected Bridget T. Zukas, 50 McDonald Road 1234 

Blanks 1644 

4132 

WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one) 

Elected Warren G. Newhouse, 85 Taft Road 869 
Elmer F. Parker, 11 Forest Street 214 
Vaughn R. Surprenant, 10 Reed Street 865 
Blanks 118 

2066 

WILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one) 

Elected Jay J. Donovan, 12 Jones Avenue 1311 
Kenneth A. Flewelling, 9 Burnham Street 378 
Blanks 377 

2066 



Question No. 1 . 

"Shall the Town vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule Proceedures Act, Chapter 592 of Acts of 1950, 
entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of Wilmington" by changing the 
date under Section 17, from the twentieth day of December to Ninety (90) days prior to the Annual Town Meet- 
ing as summarized in main warrant? 

Yes 716 
No 295 
Blanks 1055 
2066 

All elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the Town 
Clerk. 

There were Two Thousand Sixty-six (2066) votes cast. The total number of voters registered for this election 
were Nine Thousand Three Hundred and Thirty-two. 22,1% of registered voters voted in this election. 



77 



ADJOWNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING^ W IL MINGTON. MASSACHUSETTS - APRIL 25, 1981 



l.'^C p.m. the Moderator called the meeting to order there being a quorum present. The Moderator stated 
tb*» meeting had been properly posted as per return of service on previous page. The Wilmington Girl Scouts 
.0 with a Flag ceremony and the singing of America. Rev. William Murdock, the new Minister of the 
:grnionaj. Church, gave the invocation. The Moderator, John Callan began reading the warrant and was 
^ -ctrupted by Selectman Robert Cain. "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the 
warrant and take up and make reference to each article by number." 

'VRIICL'S 2. To hear reports of Conmitcees a::d act thereon. Mr. Cain, "I move that we pass over this 
'.'vicle." Motion seconded and so voted. 

/iRTICLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying 
unpaid bills of previous years or do anything in relation thereto. Mr. Caira,' "I move that we pass over 
this article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 
1981, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
ri-tes or note as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 
, Section 17 or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by A. John Imbimbo, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with the approval of 
i:h3 Selectmen to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1981 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17." Motion seconded 
Q J voted . 

oIICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries of 
• '.-ral Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
fifer from available funds, or otherwise: or do anything in relation thereto. 

...E J. To see if the Town will vot s to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of four 
LT lie?, vehicles and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the vehicles presently used by the 
Felice Department; or do anything in re'ation thrsreto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge 
of ^3aj.d observances; or do anything in relation thereto, 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (or a total of 
$1,500) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 

3i.n:nded the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters foi 
the Nee-Ellswor*:h Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b, American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 

/vRTIGLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
acquiring a parcel of land for Water Department purposes, and to determine how the appropriation shall be 
raised and to authorize the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to purchase, 
take by eminent domain, or receive as a gift a certain parcel of land for such purposes, said land being 
described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Ainsworth Road, thence N21° 05'33" W distant 877.40 
feet by land of Corey to a point, thence N71°01'53" W distant 250.00 feet by said land to a point, 
thence N18 53 ' 13" E distant 712.28 feet by other land of Corey to a point, thence S77 08' 10" E distant 
283.14 feet by other land of Corey to a point, thence SI?' 51 '50" W distant 704.22 feet by said land 



78 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 



to a point, thence N87°06'10" E distant 198.00 feet by said land to a point, thence S00°19'07" E distant 
834.24 feet by said land to the point of beginning, being Lot FA, containing 8,3 acres all as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Lot FA, Ainsworth Road, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=100', January 29, 1981, Robert L. Higgins 
Town Engineer," a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer, also being land designated as 
Parcel 2 on Assessors' Map Rl; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, said funds to be provided from Water Department available 
surplus funds notwithstanding any provision or limitation of use of available funds as found in MGL Chapter 
276 of 1926; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewer Commission) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
a water main of not less than six (6) inches but less than sixteen (16) inches in diameter for a certain 
distance in Main Street as shown on a plan on file in the office of the Town Engineer, in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 42G through to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Water & Sewer Commission) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a Town way the 1946 Layout of Phillips Avenue, 
and to accept as a Town way the 1981 Layout of Phillips Avenue as prepared by Robert L, Higgins, Town Engineer 
as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws 
(Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways 
and specific repairs thereon) which discontinuance and layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and 
which with plans therein are hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whethe 
by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construction 
of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Rocco V. DePasquale, "I move that the Town vote to postpone consideration of Articles 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 
10 and 17 and to act upon these articles at an adjourned meeting to be held at the High School Gymnasium 
Saturday, the 13th day of June, 1981 at 1:30 p.m." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or the Town Manager to apply for 
accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, without further appropria 
tions, alloted to Wilmington by the U.S. Federal Government under any federal grant program; and do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel H. Ballou, Jr., "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds 
without further appropriation allotted to Wilmington by the U.S. Federal Grant Program." Motion seconded and 
so voted. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to advise the Great and General Court not to appropriate for Fiscal 
Year 1982 more than it did for Fiscal Year 1981 for expenditures by the Commonwealth's departments and 
agencies. Further, that the savings of approximately $350,000,000 from the above cuts be redistributed to 
the cities and towns in the form of increased local aid; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris, "I move that the Town vote to advise the Great and General Court not to appro- 
priate for the Fiscal Year 1982 more than it did for Fiscal Year 1981 for expenditures by the Commonwealth's 
departments and agencies, further that the savings of approximately $350,000,000 from the above cuts be 
redistributed to the cities and towns in the form of increased local aid." Motion seconded and so voted. 



79 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell or lease the following 

unused Town-owned Buildings: 

Buzzell School Swain School 

Little West School Walker School 

Mildred Rogers School Old Library Building 

Old Center School Harnden Tavern 

Old South School 

subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount to 
be paid; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell or lease 
for one dollar ($1.00) the unused Town-owned building known as the Buzzell School, and a small parcel of land, 
to the Wilmington Housing Authority for the purpose of converting this property into housing for the elderly, 
provided that the Wilmington Housing Authority obtain suitable grants from state and/or federal agencies, 
pending the release of said building by the School Dept." Motion seconded and voted, unanimously. 
Motion #2 by Robert J, Cain, "I move that the Town vote to pass over the sale or lease of all of the listed 
town-owned buildings except the Buzzell School. Motion seconded and so voted. Finance Committee recommendec 
disapproval , 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend "The Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington" by adding to Chapter 3, the following Section 26: 

Section 26: The Selectmen and the Town Clerk shall adopt and set such fees of the Town Clerk as they 
shall deem reasonable and appropriate. These fees shall take effect upon the posting at the office of the 
Town Clerk and publication once in a newspaper of local circulation of the fee schedule (Pursuant to G.L, 
Chapter 262, Section 34), or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Aldo Caira, "I move that the Town vote to amend "The Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town 
Wilmington" by adding to Chapter 3, the following 26: 

Section 26: The Selectmen and the Town Clerk shall adopt and set such fees of the Town Clerk as they 
shall deem reasonable and appropriate. These fees shall take effect upon the posting at the office of the 
Town Clerk and publication once in a newspaper of local circulation of the fee schedule (Pursuant to G.L. 
Chapter 262, Section 34). Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53D of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws as amended; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Section 53D. Recreation and Park Self Supporting Service Revolving Funds: Creation: Authorized Use of 
Funds: Annual Report: Revocation of Provisions. 

Notwithstanding the provisions of section fifty-three, any city or town which accepts the provisions of 
this section may establish in the Town Treasury a revolving fund which shall be kept separate and apart from 
all other monies by the Treasurer and in which shall be deposited the receipts received in connection with 
the conduct of self-supporting recreation and park services of said City or Town, The principal and interest 
thereon shall be expended at the direction of the authority, commission, board or official of such City or 
Town with said responsibility without further appropriation, but only with the written approval of the mayor 
in cities, or city manager in Plan E cities, or the selectmen in towns, or in towns which have adopted the 
town manager form of government the town manager and only for the purpose of operating self-supporting 
recreation and park services. The city auditor or town accountant shall submit annually a report of said 
revolving fund to the mayor, city council, city manager, board of selectmen or town manager for their review 
and a copy of said report shall be submitted to the director of the bureau of accounts; provided that funds 
in said revolving fund shall not be used to employ or pay the salary of any employee or for the purchase of 
equipment; provided further that said revolving fund shall not exceed the sum of five thousand dollars and 
any amount in excess of five thousand dollars shall be paid into the City or Town Treasury as provided in 
section fifty-three, 

A city or town which has accepted the provisions of this section may, in like manner, revoke its 
acceptance , 

Motion by A, John Imbimbo, "I move to pass over this article," Motion seconded and so voted, 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen under the authority of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 3A(Chapter 160 of the Acts of 1973), to abandon the Town's right, title, 
and interest in all or any part of the following easements, and authorize the Selectmen to convey to the 



80 



Wilmington Redevelopment Authority or its successors in title, the Town's interest in the hereinafter mentioned 
parcels upon such terms and conditions as the Selectmen shall deem appropriate and to set the minimum amount 
required for said conveyance: | 

Parcel One: A 30' Utility Easement described in an instrument entitled "Grant of Easement" dated February 28, 
1977, and recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2266, Page 151 bound and 
described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by Jewel Drive on a curved line measuring fifty-five and 9/100 (55.09) feet; 

EASTERLY by Lot 9, as shown on said plan, in 2 courses totalling two hundred seventy-one and 54/100 (271.54) 
feet; 

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority, as shown on said plan, in 2 
courses totalling four hundred sixty-four and 25/100 (464.25) feet; 
WESTERLY by Cook Avenue, thirty and 56/100 (30.56) feet; 

NORTHERLY by Lot 10, as shown on said plan, in 2 courses totalling four hundred thirty-four and 9/100 
(434.09) feet; and 

WESTERLY by Lot 10, as shown on said plan, in a curved line measuring two hundred fifty-four and 1/100 
(254.01) feet; all as shown as Parcel A on a plan entitled "Plan of Easements to be Abandoned, Jewel 
Industrial Park, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=100', July 11, 1980, K.J. Miller Co., Inc., Civil Engineers 6e 
Land Surveyors, 106 West Street, Wilmington, Mass." Said parcel contains 21,360 square feet of land, more 
or less, according to said plan. 

Parcel Two: A 30' Drain and Utility Easement described in an instrument entitled "Conveyance of Easements 
and Utilities" dated June 10, 1976, and recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
2266, Page 129, at page 131, bound and described as follows: 
WESTERLY by Jewel Drive, thirty and 97/100 (30.97) feet; 

NORTHER^jY by Lot 8A, as shown on said plan, two hundred eighteen and 39/100 (218.39) feet; 

EASTERLY by land shown on said plan as 30' Drain and Rail Easement, thirty and 00/100 (30.00) feet; and 

SOUTHERLY by Lot 9, as shown on said plan, two hundred twenty-five and 03/100 (225.03) feet; 

all as shown as Parcel B on a plan entitled "Plan of Easements to be Abandoned, Jewel Industrial Park, 

Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=100'. July 11, 1980, K.J. Miller Co., Inc., Civil Engineers & Land Surveyors, 

106 West Street, Wilmington, Mass." Said parcel contain" 6,648 square feet of land, more or less, according 

to said plan. 

Parcel Three: A certain parcel of land being the Easterly portion of the Jewel Drive cul-de-sac, described 
in an instrument entitled "Grant of Easement" dated July 11, 1977, and recorded with the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2266, Page 136 bound and described as follows: 

WESTERLY by a line being the easterly bound of Jewel Drive in 2 courses totalling two hundred six and 31/100 
(206.31) feet; and 

NORTHEASTERLY, EASTERLY AND SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot 8A, 30' Drain and Utility Easement and Lot 9, as shown on 
said plan, in two curved courses measuring two hundred eighty-nine and 10/100 (289.10) feet; 
all shown as Parcel C on a plan entitled "Plan of Easements to be Abandoned, Jewel Industrial Park, Wilming- 
ton, Mass., Scale 1"=100', July 11, 1980, K.J.Miller Co., Inc., Civil Engineers & Land Surveyors, 106 West 
Street, Wilmington, Mass." Said parcel contains 10,167 square feet of land, more or less, according to said 
plan. 

Parcel Four: A 30' Drain and Utility Easement discribed in an instrument entitled "Conveyance of Easements 
and Utilities" dated June 10, 1976, and recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deed in Book 
2266, Page 129 at page 131, and in an instrument dated January 11, 1977 and recorded with the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2266, Page 140, bound and described as follows: 
EASTERLY by Jewel Drive, thirty and 00/100 (30.00) feet; 

SOUTHERLY by Lot 10 as shown on said plan, three hundred twenty-seven and 07/100 (327.07) feet; 
WESTERLY by land now or formerly of Spellenburg and Williams thirty and 00/100 (30.00) feet; and 
NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Altron, Incorporated, three hundred twenty-seven and 17/100 (327.17) 
feet; all as shown as Parcel D on a plan entitled "Plan of Easements to be Abandoned, Jewel Industrial 
Park, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=100', July 11, 1980, K.J. Miller Co., Inc. Civil Engineers & Land Surveyors 
106 West Street, Wilmington, Mass." Said parcel contains 9,814 square feet of land, more or less, according 
to said plan; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by John DeRoy of the Planning Board, "I move that the Town abandon the Town right, title and interest 
in the Utility easement on Jewel Drive as described in the main motion, with the price set for conveyance 
to be $1.00." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

Article by Planning Board. 



81 



ADJORNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Jackson Brothers, 
Inc., a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 43 on Assessors' Map 69, bound and described as 
follows : 

Westerly by Faulkner Avenue (Faulkner Rd.) 50 feet 

Northerly by Lot 755 100 feet 

Easterly by Lot 752 50 feet 

Southerly by Brookline Avenue 100 feet 

being Lots 753 & 754 containing 5,000 square feet, all as shown on L.C. 6036, reserving unto themselves and 
the Town of Wilmington for roadway and roadway sloping purposes the following described area: 

Westerly by Faulkner Avenue (Faulkner Rd,) 50 feet 

Northerly by Lot 755 5 feet 

Easterly through Lots 753 & 754 45 feet 

Northerly through Lot 753 95 feet 

Easterly by Lot 752 5 feet 

Southerly by Brookline Avenue 100 feet 

containing 725 square feet substantially as shown on L.C. 6036, subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything 
in relation thereto. (Article by Petition) Finance Committee recommends tabling pending advice of property 
value. 

Motion by Rocco V. DePasquale, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to 
Jackson Borthers, Inc. a certain parcel of Town-owned land as shown on Assessors' Map 69, Parcel 43 bound 
and described in the main motion for the sum set by the Selectmen of $4,800. minimum. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize State Representative James R. Miceli to petition the 
State Legislature to adopt recall rights of elected officials in the Town of Wilmington, as voted by the 
people re: Warrant Article Number 1, Special Town Meeting, December 8, 1980; thereby making it clear to all 
parties that this was the intent of that town meeting vote; or do anything in relation thereto. (Article by 
Petition) Finance Committee recommends disapproval. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
State Legislature to enact special legislation pertaining to the Town of Wilmington amending Chapter 592 of 
the Acts of 1950, An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government , by inserting the following language 
under Section 3: 

1. RECALL OF ELECTED OFFICERS 

(a) Application - Any person who holds an elected town office with more than six months remaining of 
the term of office may be recalled from the office by the voters in the manner provided in this 
section, 

(b) Recall Petitions - One hundred and fifty or more voters may file with the town clerk an affidavit 
containing the name of the officer whose recall is sought and a statement of the grounds upon which 
the petition is based. The signatures on such petition shall contain the names of at least ten voters 
in each of the precincts into which the town is divided for the purpos>3 of electing town officers. 

If the said petition is found to be valid the town clerk shall thereupon deliver to the ten persons 
first named on such petitions, petition blanks demanding said recall, printed forms of which he shall 
keep available. The blanks may be completed by printing or typewriting; they shall be addressed to 
the Board of Selectmen; they shall contain the names of the ten persons to whom they are issued and 
the grounds for recall as stated in the affidavit; they shall demand the election of a successor to 
the office; they shall be dated and signed by the town clerk. The recall petition shall be returned 
to the office of the town clerk within twenty days following the date they are issued, signed by at 
least ten percent of the total number of persons registered to vote as of the date of the most recent 
town election. 

The Town Clerk shall, within twenty- four hours following such filing with him, submit the petitions to 
the board of Registrars of voters which shall within five days thereafter, certify thereon the number 
of signatures which are names of voters. 

(c) Recall Elections - If the petitions shall be certified by the registrars of voters to be suffi- 
cient, the town clerk shall forthwith submit the same with his certificate to the Board of Selectmen, 
Upon its receipt of the certified petition the Board of Selectmen shall forthwith give notice, in 
writing, of said petition to the officer whose recall is sought. If said officer does not resign his 
office within five days following delivery of the said notice, the Board of Selectmen shall order a 
special election to be held not less than thirty-five nor more than sixty days after the date of the 



82 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 



certification of the town clerk that the petition is sufficient. If a vacancy occurs in the office after a 
recall election has been ordered, the election shall nevertheless proceed as provided in this section, but 
only the ballots for condidates need be counted. 

(d) Nomination of Candidates - The nomination of (other) candidates, the publication of the warrant 
for the recall election and the conduct of the recall election shall be in accordance with the charter 
and general laws regulating elections. 

(e) Propositions on the Ballot - Ballots used at the recall election shall state the proposition in 
the order indicated: 

For the recall of 
(name of Officer) 

Against the recall of 
(name of officer) 

Adjacent to each proposition shall be a place to vote for either of said proposition. After the said 
proposition shall appear the word 'candidates' and the names of the candidates arranged as determined 
by a drawing by lot conducted by the town clerk which shall be open to the public, unless another 
arrangement is required by a general law. If a majority of the votes cast on the proposition is 
against the recall the votes for candidates need not be counted. If a majority of the votes cast is 
in favor of the recall the votes for candidates shall be counted and the candidates receiving the 
highest number of votes shall be declared elected. 

(f) Officeholder - The incumbent shall continue to hold his office and to perform his dueties until 
the recall election. If he is not then recalled he shall continue in office for the remainder of his 
unexpired term, subject to recall as provided in section (g) below. 

If the officer is recalled he shall be deemed removed upon the certification of the election results. 
The condidate who receives the highest number of votes shall serve for the balance of the unexpired 
term. 

(g) Request of Recall Petition - No recall shall be filed against an officer within six months after 
he takes office, or in the case of an officer subjected to recall and not recalled thereby, until at 
least six months after the election at which his recall was submitted to the voters. 

2. This act shall be submitted for acceptance to the voters of the town of Wilmington at the next annual 
town meeting or a special town meeting, whichever occurs first, in the form of the following question which 
shall be placed before such meeting: 

"Shall an act passed by the General Coutt in the year nineteen hundred and eighty-one entitled 'An Act provid- 
ing for removal elections in the town of Wilmington', be accepted?" If a majority of the votes cast in 
answer to said question is in the affirmative this act shall take effect, but not otherwise. Motion seconded. 
After much discussion and the explanation of procedure by Town Counsel, Alan Altman the vote was taken requir- 
ing a 2/3rds vote to pass. Yes 210 No 34. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 50A of Chapter 147 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws to permit Courses of Instruction in Boxing, etc.; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by 
petition. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town pass over this article and take no action thereon. Motion 
seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmirtgton 
by voting to rezone from Single-Residence-A District to High Density Traffic Business District, the following 
described parcel of land to wit: 

A certain parcel of land located in Wilmington, Mass., Middlesex County, with a building thereon situated 
on the Westerly side of Main Street as shown as Lot A on Plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., 
Marion T. Murphy, Scale: 1" = 40',- December 22, 1970 Charles H. Moloy - Woburn, Mass., Registered Land 
Surveyor," recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 120, Plan I, bound 
and discribed as follows: 

EASTERLY by Main Street, as shown on said plan, 100.00 feet; 

SOUTHERLY by an unnumbered Lot; as shown on said Plan, 90 feet or less; 

WESTERLY: by Old Main Street, as shown on said Plan, 100 feet; 

NORTHERLY by Lot B, as shown on said Plan, 120 feet more or less; containing 10,500 square feet more 
or less; 

also being shown as Map 12, Parcel 1 on the Town Assessors' Maps; or do anything in relation thereto. 



83 



ARTICLE 21 (continued) 



Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion by Larz Neilson, "I move to amend 
Article 21 to rezone from single family Risidence A to General Business, the same lot as described in the 
motion as proposed. However, as the petitioner was not present this was taken as the main motion and so 
seconded. With very little discussion the vote was taken with results being Yes 1 No 215. Motion lost. 

(^TICLE 22. To see if the Town of Wilmington will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town 
of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business District the following 
described area bound; 

WESTERLY by the 1978 layout of West ^treet 53.16 feet, 63.06 feet, 97.12 feet, 10.00 feet and by the 1969 
layout of West Street 190 - feet, 90" and 2'5-feet. 
SOUTHERLY by the existing Industrial District, 420"^ feet. 

EASTERLY, NORTHEASTERLY, AND NORTHERLY by Route 93, 240t feet, 180.28 feet, 387.81 feet and 18.53 feet; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Planning Board recommends approval. 

Motion by Albert Fiorenza, "I move that the Town of Wilmington amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Single Resident A to General Business District the following 
described area bound", the remainder of the motion follows the above article to the letter. The motion was 
seconded and after much discussion the vote was taken. 2/3rds vote required for this article. Yes 115 No 111 
Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding a new 
section to the Wilmington Zoning By-Law as follows: 

III -7 USES IN PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT -PRD DISTRICTS 

A. GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

The PRD district is intended to allow greater flexibility in land use planning for the development of 
tracts of land in terms of preservation of open spaces, enhancement of natural features and provision 
of a variety of housing types and styles; to ensure that overall development plans will be presented 
to ensure that overall development plans will be presented to the Town Meeting in connection with any 
proposal to rezone a tract of land to PRD District; and to enable the Planning Board to require adher- 
ence to such overall development plans in the granting of a special permit which shall control all 
aspects of the proposed PRD as hereinafter described. 

B. TOWN MEETING PRESENTATION 

Every proposal presented to Town Meeting for rezoning land to a PRD District shall include an overall 
development plan which shall show in a general manner, drawn to scale, existing natural features in- 
cluding the limits of the Flood Plain District and Wetlands as determined and regulated in accordance 
with G.L.c,131 Sec. 40, "The Wetlands Protection Act," the proposed locations, types and floor plans 
for proposed buildings and other structures, proposed location of streets, drives, parking areas and 
other paved areas, the proposed grading of the site and the proposed open space. A copy of the over- 
all development plan, which shall be deemed to include any literature and comments, authorized by th< 
developer which will be or has been presented to Town Meeting shall be filed with the Town Clerk to- 
gether with the Article to rezone the subject site to PRD District. 

C. PRD STANDARDS 

1. Minimum Tract Size - a PRD shall be permitted upon a single tract, in one ownership with defini- 
tive boundaries ascertainable from a record deed and recorded plan or new survey plan if required by 
the Planning Board, which has an area of not less than 15 acres. Existing public and private ways 
need not constitute boundaries of the tract but area within any such way shall not be counted in 
determining compliance with PRD standards. 

2. Permissible Density - The number of dwelling units permitted within any PRD shall not exceed three 
and one half units per acre exclusive of land situated in the Flood Plain District and exclusive of 
Wetlands as defined in G.L.c. 131 Sec. 40, "The Wetlands Protection Act." 

3. Permitted Uses - There shall be permitted in a PRD: 



84 



ARTICLE 23 (continued) 



a. Single- family detached and attached, and multi-unit structures of all types without regard to dwell- 
ing unit configuration or form of ownership. 

b. Accessory uses incidental to the principal residential uses indicated above. 

4. Lot Area, Frontage and Yard Requirements - There shall be no miniumum lot area, frontage or yard 
requirements within a PRD. However no building shall be erected within 50 feet of any public way or 
boundary line of the overall PRD tract or within 50 feet of any private way when it is determined bv the 
Planning Board to be necessary. 

5. Height - No building shall be more than two and one-half stories or 38 feet in height. 

6. Water and Sewer - The PRD shall be serviced by municipal water and municipal sewer. 

7. Design and Construction Requirements - To the degree determined applicable by the Planning Board all 
design and construction requirements shall comply with "Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision 
of Land in the Town of Wilmington." All private roads, driveways, parking areas and other PRD facilities; 
shall be fully maintained and operated by all of the owners of the units. 

8. Area of Residential Development - The area developed for residential uses, including buildings, 
parking and other areas paved for vehicular use, shall not exceed 307o of the total area of the PRD tract. 
Foot and bicycle paths and recreation facilities, including buildings wholly devoted to recreation, shall 
not be counted in calculating the 307o limitation. 

9. Common Open Space 

a. All land within the PRD tract which is not covered by buildings, roads, driveways, parking areas or 
which is not set aside as private yards, patios or gardens for the residents, shall be Common Open 
Space shall equal at least 40% of the total area of the tract. Such land shall have a shape dimension, 
character and location suitable to assure its use for park, recreation, conservation or agricultural 
purposes by at least all the residents of the PRD. 

A minimum of 25% of the non-Flood Plain or non-Wetlands area of the tract shall be included in the 
required Common Open Space. Each parcel of Common Open Space shall have adequate access for all the 
residents of the PRD and no structure s'hall be constructed thereon in excess of 20 feet in height nor 
shall the maximum lot coverage including paved areas exceed 10% without Planning Board approval. 

b. Provisions shall be made so that the Common Open Space and other common property shall be owned in 
common by the owners of all units in the PRD, or by a corporation, non-profit organization or trust 
whose members are all the owners of the units. In all cases, a perpetual restriction of the type 
described in G.L.c. 184 Sec. 31 running to and enforceable by the Town shall be recorded in respect to 
the Common Open Space. Such restriction shall provide that the Common Open Space shall be retained in 
perpetuity for one or more of the following uses: conservation, open space, agriculture, recreation or 
park. Such restriction shall be in such form and substance as the Planning Board may prescribe and deem 
appropriate . 

c. In order to ensure that the corporation, non-profit organization or trust will properly maintain the 
Common Open Space and other common property and instrument (s) shall be recorded at the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds which shall as a minimum provide: 

(1) A legal description of the Common Open Space. 

(2) A statement of the purposed for which the Common Open Space is intended to be used and the restric- 
tions on its use and alienation. 

(3) The type and name of the corporation, non-profit organization, or trust which will own, manage and 
maintain the Common Open Space. 

(4) The ownership or beneficial interest in the corporation, non-profit organization or trust of each 
owner of a dwelling in the PRD development and a provision that such ownership or beneficial interest 
shall be appurtenant to the dwelling to which it relates and may not be conveyed or encumbered separately 
therefrom. 

(5) Provisions for the number, term of office, and the manner of election to office, removal from office 
and the filling of vacancies in the office of directors and/or officers of the corporation or non-profit 



85 



ARTICLE 23 (continued) 



(6) Procedures for the conduct of the affairs and business of the corporation, non-profit organization or 
trust including provision for the calling and holding of meetings of members and directors and/or officers* 
of the corporation or non-profit organization or beneficiaries and trustees of the trust and provision 

for quorum and voting requirements for action to be taken. Each owner of a dwelling shall have voting 
rights proportional to his ownership or beneficial interest in the corporation, non-profit organization 
or trust. 

(7) Provision for the management, maintenance, operation, improvement and repair of the Common Open Space 
and facilities thereon, including provisions for obtaining and maintaining adequate insurance and levy- 
ing and collecting from the dwelling owners common charges to pay for expenses associated with the Common 
Open Space, including real estate taxes. It shall be provided that common charges are to be allocated 
among the dwelling owners in proportion to their ownership or beneficial interests in the corporation, 
non-profit organization or trust, and that ech dwelling owners 's share of the common charge shall be a 
lien against his real estate in the PRD, which shall have priority over all other liens with the excep- 
tion of municipal liens and first mortgages of record, and 

(8) The method by which such instrument or instruments may be amended. 

10. Limitation of Subdivision - No lot shown on a plan for which a PRD permit is granted may be further sub- 
divided, and a notation to this effect shall be placed on the plan of record which shall be recorded with 
the special permit. 

11. Special Provisions for the Wilmington Housing Authority - Except as provided in Subsection 4. Lot Area, 
Frontage and Yard Requirements, Subsection 5. Height, Subsection 6. Water and Sewer and Subsection 

7. Design and Construction Requirements, the limitations contained in Section C. PRD Standards shall not 
apply to a PRD which will be owned by the Wilmington Housing Authority, provided that upon Town Meeting 
approval of the rezoning the Planning Board finds that the proposed design is generally consistent with 
the purposes and objectives of this By-Law. 

D. PROCEDURE FOR REZONING AND APPROVAL 

1. Town Meeting Submission and Rezoning 

a. Any person who submits a Warrant Article to rezone land to a PRD District shall comply with the 
provisions of Section B. Town Meeting Presentation and shall meet with the Planning Board and file eight 
sets of an overall development plan and supporting documents which shall be prepared by an interdiscipli- 
nary development team comprised of a Registered Professional Engineer, Registered Land Surveyor, 
Architect and Landscape Architect or similar professionals approved in writing by the Planning Board. 

b. The Planning Board shall, within ten days of receipt of a submission hereunder, refer the application 
to the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Water and Sewer Commission, Police and Fire Departments, 
Town Engineer and Building Inspector for written reports and preliminary recommendations which shall be 
returned within 35 days. 

c. Based upon this initial review the Planning Board may request such additional information as the 
Planning Board may determine is reasonably necessary for Town Meeting consideration. It is recommended 
that the applicant continue to meet with the Planning Board to review the overall development plan and 
identify appropriate revisions and amendments to the overall submission. 

d. Prior to the Town Meeting vote any person who submits a Warrant Article to rezone land to a PRD 
District shall: (1) submit to the Conservation Commission in accordance with G.L.c. 131 Sec. 40, "The 
Wetlands Protection Act" a request for a determination of applicablity or a notice of intent; and (2) 
file with the Town Clerk either a determination by the Conservation Commission that a notice of intent is 
not required or an order of conditions issued pursuant to G.L.c. 131 Sec 40 "The Wetlands Protection Act" 
for the proposed PRD. 

e. Planning Board Town Meeting Report - The Planning Board shall report to Town Meeting: (1) if it finds 
that the PRD is in harmony with the general objectives and intent of the PRD Section: (2) that the PRD 
contains a mix of residential, open spaces and other uses in a variety of buildings to be sufficiently 
advantageous to the Town to render it appropriate to depart from the requirements of this By-Law appli- 
cable to the District (s) in which the PRD tract is located: and (3) if sufficient data to give reason- 
able assurance that the development will conform to all the PRD provisions is included in the applicant's 
presentation to Town Meeting. 



86 



ARTICLE 2 3 (continued) 



2. Procedure for Special Permit, 

a. After approval by Town Meeting of a PRD District, any person who desires a special permit to 
construct the PRD shall submit an application and eight copies of all plans in such form as the Planning 
Board may require which shall include the following: 

(1) A Development Statement containing a petition, a list of parties in interest with respect to the 
PRD tract, a list of the development team, an overall evaluation of existing site features and a state- 
ment on the development team, an overall evaluation of existing site features and a statement on the 
development concept including in tabular and plan form the size of the tract, the area of wetlands and 
flood plain, the number of units, type, size (nimiiber of bedrooms, floor area), ground coverage and area 
of residential development and common open space and a development schedule for all site improvements. 

(2) Copies of the proposed instruments to be recorded with the plans including the Common Open Space 
perpetual restriction, the deed and the "^fimbership corporation, non-profit organization or trust 
instrument . 

(3) Development plans bearing the seal of a Registered Professional Engineer, Registered Land Surveyor, 
Architect, Landscape Architect or similar professional as appropriate and consisting of: 

*Site Plan and specifications showing all site improvements and meeting, to the extent applicable, the 
requirements set forth for a Definitive Plan in the Subdivision Rules and Regulations of the Planning 
Board; 

*Site perspective, sections, elevation 1/8 inch equals 1 foot, and typical floor plans % inch equals 
one foot ; 

*Detail plans for disposal of sanitary sewage, solid waste and surface drainage; and 
*Detailed plans for landscaping. 

b. The Planning Board shall within ten days of receipt of an application hereunder, refer the applica- 
tion to the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Water and Sewer Commission, Police and Fire Depart- 
ments, Town Engineer and Building Inspector for written reports and recommendations and no decision 
shall be made until such reports are returned or 35 days have elapsed following such referral without 
receipt of such reports. 

c. Planning Board Decisions - A special permit which shall control all aspects of the proposed PRD 
shall be issued only if the Planning Board finds that the plans submitted to it for a special permit 
conform substantially to the overall development plan presented to Town Meeting and that the PRD is in 
harmony with the objectives and intent of this PRD section. If a special permit is granted, the Plan- 
ning Board may impose as a condition thereof that the installation of municipal services and construc- 
tion of ways within the PRD shall comply with the requirements of the Subdivision Rules and Regulations 
of the Planning Board, may require sufficient security to ensure such compliance and the completion of 
planned recreation facilities and site amenities, and may impose such additional safeguards as public 
safety, welfare and convenience may require. 

and by amending the Wilmington Zoning By-Law in the following manner: 

(1) By deleting in Section 1-2. A the words: 

"A. For the purpose of this By-Law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the following 
districts : 



1. Rural Districts (R) 

2. Single-Residence-A Districts (SRA) 

3. Single-Residence-B Districts (SRB) 

4. Neighborhood Business District (NB) 

5. General Business Districts 

(GB) 

6. Industrial Districts (IND) 

7. High Density Traffice Business Districts (HDTB) 



87 



ARTICLE 23 (continued) 



8. Flood Plain Districts (W) 
and substituting in place thereof the words: 

"A. For the purpose of this By-Law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the following 
Districts : 



1. Rural Districts (R) 

2. Single-Residence-A Districts (SRA) 

3. Single-Residence-B Districts (SRB) 

4. Planned Residential Development Districts (PRD) 

5. Neighborhood Business Districts (NB) 

6. General Business Districts (GB) 

7. Industrial Districts (IND) 

8. High Density Traffic Business Districts (HDTB) 

9. Flood Plain Districts (W)" 



(2) By adding in Section II a new Section 18 as follows: 



"18. PLANNING BOARD. The Town of Wilmington Planning Board which for purposes of Chapter 40A shall 
be deemed the Special Permit Granting Authority on petitions for Planned Residential Development as set 
forth in Section III-7." 



(3) By adding in Section IV-3A a new Section 12 as follows: 



"12. For a Planned Residential Development, two (2) spaces per dwelling unit, except in the case of 
Housing for the Elderly one (1) space per dwelling unit." 

(4) By adding in Section IV-3E, after the words, "parking spaces" in the second line, the words, 
"except when such spaces are located in a Planned Residential Development," so that the amended provision 
would read as follows: 



"...a site plan for three or more parking spaces, except when such spaces are located in a Planned 
Residential Development, shall be submitted to the Town Engineer,..." 

(5) By deleting in Section IV-4 after the words "a Single-Residence-A" in the sixth line, the words 
"or Single-Residence-B District" and substituting in place thereof the words, "Single-Residence-B 
District or Planned Residential Development District." so that the amended provisionwould read as 
follows: 



"...a Single-Residence-A District, a Single-Residence-B District or Planned Residential Development 
District." 

(6) By deleting in Section V-1 after the words "SCHEDULE OF REQUIREMENTS" the words "In any District" 
and substituting in place thereof the words "In the following Districts" so that the amended provision 
would read as follows: 



"In the following Districts, no use of premises shall be authorized..." 

(7) By adding in Section VI1-2B after the words "May be authorized by" in the fifteenth line, the 
words "The Planning Board for uses under Section III-7 and by" so that the amended provision would 
read as follows: 



"Application" for a Special Permit which may be authorized by the Planning Board for uses under 
Section III-7 and by the Board of Appeals for uses under Section 111-lB..." 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board recommends approval. 



88 



ARTICLE 23. (continued) 



Motion by Paul K. Butt, "I move tha the town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by 
adding a new section to the Wilmington Zoning Bv-Law as follows: 

SECTION III-7 USES IN PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT -PRD DISTRICTS, the motion being the same as the article 
the Moderator directed Mr. Butt to dispense with further reading of the motion. The motion was seconded. 

A motion was then made by Madelyn McKie to amend Article 23 -PRD. "I move to amend Article 23 as follows: 

(1) Amend "A. General Objectives" by adding at the end of the section the following: 

"the objectives of the PRD District shall conform to the purposes of the Wilmington Zoning By-law 
and Chapter 40A as amended by Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975. No more than 10% of the dwelling 
units in any precinct shall be located ina PRD." 

(2) Amend "C.PRD Standards section 3. a." to read: 

"3. a. At least 507o detached single-family and 50% attached single-family and multi-unit structures 
of all types, except that no structure shall exceed 100 feet in length." 

(3) Amend "C. PRD Standards section 3.b." to read: 

"3.b. Accessory uses as listed in Section 111-I.A.9. of this by-law." 

(4) Amend "D. Procedure for Rezoning and Approval sectioa I.e. (1) by adding after the words "PRD 
Section" the following: 

"And the intent and purpose of this by-law and Ch. 40A as amended by Chapter 808 of the Acts of 
1975" 

(5) Amend "D. Procedure for Rezoning and Approval Section 2.c. as follows: 

At the end of the first sentence add the words: 

"and the intent and purpose of this by-law and of Ch.40A as amended by Ch.808 of the Acts of 
1975" 

(6) Amend line 5 of Section 2.C.P.B. decisions change the word "may" to "shall" 

(7) Amend line 6 of Section 2.c. change the words "require sufficient security to ensure such compli- 
ance and the completion of planned recreation facilities and site amenities" to the following; 

"require ten per cent (10%) of the total cost of the development to be bonded or otherwise 
secured and one hundred percent (1007.) of the phase to be constructed to be bonded or other- 
wise secured" 

(8) Amend line 7 of Section 2.c. add the following after the last sentence: 

"Planning Board approval shall be contingent upon the posting of an annual maintenance bond." 

Motion was seconded and the Moderator stated that each part would be taken separately. After Mrs. McKie 
gave an explanation for the first amendment, the body voted No, unanimously. She then asked if it would be 
of any sense to go on and was voted unanimously to dispense with any further amendments. 

At this point the Moderator asked for a standing vote of 2/3rds on the original motion. The vote was Yes 113 
No 77. Motion lost for want of 2/3rds vote. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to ratify the Solid Waste Disposal Agreement between the Board of 
Selectmen/Town Manager and the Northeast Solid Waste Committee for the use of a solid waste disposal facility 
a copy of which is on file in the Town Clerk's office, all in compliance with and as authorized by the vote 
of the annual town meeting held on March 11, 1978; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. 

Motion by Daniel Ballou, Jr. "I move that the town vote to ratify the Solid Waste Disposal agreement bf.tween 
the Board of Selectmen/Town Manager and the Northeast Solid Waste Committee for the use of a solid waste 
disposal facility, a copy of which is on file in the Town Clerk's office, all in compliance with and as 
authorized by the vote of the Annual Town Meeting held on March 11, 1978; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Motion was seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



89 



ARTICLE 24. (continued) 



The Moderator asked for a motion to adjourn as the business of the meeting had been taken care of; This was 
interrupted by Al Fiorenza giving notice that in accordance with Section 18 of the Town By-Laws that he is 
moving for reconsideration at the June 13th continued Town Meeting of his Article 22. Notice was taken 
thereof. Following this motion Mr. Paul Butt gave notice that he also was going to ask for reconsideration 
at the June 13th continued session of the Annual Town Meeting on Article 23. Notice was taken thereof. 

At this point Selectman Robert Cain made a motion, "I move that the Town vote to adjourn this meeting and to 
assemble again on Saturday, June 13, 1981 at 1:30 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium to consider Articles 
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 & 17. Motion was seconded unanimously and so voted. 

At 4:17 p.m. the Moderator declared that with no further action to come before this section of the Annual 
Town Meeting he declared the meeting adjourned until June 13th at 1:30 p.m. 

There were 313 voters and 12 non-voters in attendance at this Town Meeting. 



WARRANT SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 18. 1981 
TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised By- 
Laws of said town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Barrows Auditorium in the High School, in said Town of Wilmington 
on Monday evening, the eighteenth day of May A.D. 1981 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following 
articles : 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Tovm of Wilmington 
by voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to Industrial District, the following described parcel 
of land to wit. 

Bound and described as follows; 

Southerly by Butters Row 202.38 feet 

Westerly by land of Bedell 180.00 feet 

Southerly by said land 158.95 feet 

Westerly by land of Lee Realty Trust 414.58 feet 

Southerly by said land 610.^ feet 

Westerly by land of Bedell 1930.- feet 

Northerly by land of Sughrue 200.00 feet 

Westerly by said land 200.00 feet 

Northerly by land of Trexler 83.91 feet 

Easterly by land of Diamond Crystal Salt Co. 674.94 feet 

Northerly by said land 456. 'i' feet 

Easterly by land of B.&M. R.R. Corporation 944.99 feet 

621.01 feet, 280.00 feet & 635.90 feet 
being part of parcel 11 on Assessors' Map 29. (Article by Petition) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to David S. Salera, 
20 Shawsheen Avenue, Wilmington a certain parcel of Town owned land shown as parcel 28 on Assessors' Map 
84 containing about 53,600 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine 
and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
(Article by Petition) 

Hereof fail not and make due return of the Warrant, or a certified copy thereof with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk as soon as may be and before said meeting. Given under our hands and seal of said Town this 
27th day of April, A.D., One Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-One. 

Board of Selectmen 
s/Robert J.Cain 
s/Rocco V. DePasquale 
8 /A. John Imbimbo 
s/Aldo A. Caira 
s/Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 



90 



Special Town Meeting (continued) 



On May 18, 1981 at 7:40 p.m. at the Barrows Auditorium, in the High School the Moderator declared that a 
quorum being present, the Special Town Meeting was called to order. The Moderator started reading the W 
and was interrupted by Robert J. Cain with a motion to dispense with the reading of the Warrant and t^jk^ 
article by number. Motion was seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmin 
by voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to. Industrial Di.-trict. the following described pai 
of land to wit. oi. 



Bound and described as follows; 



» 



Southerly by Butters Row 


202 


38 


feet 


Westerly by land of Bedell 


180 


00 


feet 


Southerly by said land 


158 


95 


feet 


Westerly by land of Lee Realty Trust 


414 


58 


feet 


Southerly by said land 


610 


+ 


feet 


Westerly by land of Bedell 


1930 


+ 


feet 


Northerly by land of Sughrue 


200 


00 


feet 


Westerly by said land 


200 


00 


feet 


Northerly by land of Trexler 


83 


91 


feet 


Easterly by land of Diamond Crystal Salt Co. 


674 


94 


feet 


Northerly by said land 


456 


+ 


feet 


Easterly by land of B. & M. R.R. Corporation 


944 


99 


feet 


621.01 feet, 280 feet & 


635 


90 


feet 



being part of parcel 11 on Assessors' Map 29. (Article by Petition) 



Motion by John Cushing to read the same as above printed Article 1, and was so seconded. 

Amendment #1. by Janet F. Diorio, "I move that said land to be rezoned Industrial on the conditions that 
Sweetheart Plastic purchase this land within one year as well as purchase access rights for a grade cro* 
onto Route 38. If Sweetheart Plastics cannot purchase access rights and a grade crossing or if they de: 
not to purchase this land, that said land be rezoned back to residential immediately. This motion was . 
and seconded. A standing vote was taken after much discussion. Yes 52 No 207. Amendment lost. 

Amendment y^2. by Janet F. Diorio, I move that said land be rezoned Industrial only if access rights a'! 
grade crossing onto Route 38 are obtained. Motion seconded. A voice vote was taken and the amendment 

Finance Committee recommends approval of Article 1 and also Planning Board recommends approval. A 2/3r'. 
vote being required a vote was taken after much discussion. Motion so voted. Yes 223 No 48. So voter'. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to David S. hs. 
20 Shawsheen Avenue, Wilmington a certain parcel of Town owned land shown as parcel 28 on Assessors' ■ . 
containing about 53,600 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may deter li 
further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by David S. Salera read the same as the main article with the amount of $18,000 added to be p.=- 
such conveyance. Motion was seconded and standing vote v?a£' taken. Yes 224 No 2. Motion so voted. 

All articles having been acted upon the motion to adjourn was made and seconded and so voted. The fu • 
declared the meeting adjourned at 8:53 p.m. 



There were 284 voters and 17 non-voters in atCendf<nc*- 



Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

I Attest: Wilmington, Massachusetts 



91 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - JUNE 13, 1981 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



This adjourned meeting was properly posted in six precincts June 3, 1981 by Constable Arthur V, Lynch, Jr. in 
accordance with Chapter 2, Section 6 of the Inhabitant By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington. This notice was 
also published in the Town Crier June 3rd and June 10th, 1981. 

The Mc:lerator announced that a quorum was present at 1:45 p.m. and announced that Rep. James Miceli had a 
quest. i-onaire in the hallway and would appreciate all attending to fill it out. At 1:55 p.m. the meeting was 
called to order and the Moderator asked the people to stand for a prayer asking for guidance in all decisions 
to come before us. 

As above, the Moderator announced that this meeting had been properly published and posted. Before taking 
the budget the Moderator announced that he would not accept any proposals to reconsider any articles until 
the total budget had been voted so that in the end the total amount could be adjusted fairly if need be to 
come within the total levy limit. 

James Miceli explained the State Budget and Walter Kaminski explained the 2k budget or Chapter 580 which is 
2^. Alan Altman explained the levy limit and read passages from a letter received from the Bureau of Accounts. 

Before the Moderator could finish stating the rules of the Town Meeting a spectator on the floor rose and 
tried to be recognized, not knowing the proper procedure, would not be seated and wait to be recognized. 
After much confusion, she finally went to a microphone and asked that the line item "School Budget" be brought 
vip first, "mud, trees, etc." should come after. Later it was announced that the speaker was Elizabeth 
Wheeler from 29 Glen Road. The motion was accepted and the vote was Yes 267 No 240 to move that line item 
up in the line of voting. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Motior by Lester E. White, "I move that it be and hereby is the determination of the School 
Committee that the sum ot $7,393,895 is the amount necessary for the support and operation of 
the public schools in the Town of Wilmington for the 1981-1982 fiscal year as voted by the 
Wilmington School Committee at their meeting of June 10, 1981; said vote being five (5) in 
favor and one (1) opposed, and that the budget for 1981-1982 bt reduced by the estimated 
remaining unspent funds in the federal accounts under public laws 864 and 974 in the amount of 
$165,000 leaving an amount of $7,228,895 to be raised by taxation. Motion was seconded and voted 



ifter 2k hours discussion. Standing vote was conducted. Yes 303 No 258. Motion so voted. 
This vote made this line item, $117,017 over Finance Committee recommendations. $ 7,228,895.00 

! 

Vocational Training • ' 

Regional Vocational School District 491.710.00 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT $ 7,720,605.00 

Motion by Robert Cain, Selectmen, "I move that each line item in the Fiscal 1982 Budget or groups of line 
items not be open for reconsideration having once been voted upon until the entire budget has been completed. " 
The voice vote was doubtful. The Moderator then asked for a standing vote. Yes 343 No i6&. So voted. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 2,500.00 

Expenses 5,450.00 

7,950.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 7,000.00 

Expenses 9,200.00 

16,200.00 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 2,000.00 

Expenses 8,200.00 

10,200.00 



92 



Finance Committee 

Salary $ 800.00 

Expenses 3, 940.00 

(Salary amount questioned on voice vote. Standing vote Yes 319 No 28.) 4,740.00 

Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 30,000.00 

Other Salaries 17,688.00 

Expenses 950.00 

48,638.00 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 23,919.00 

Other Salaries 15,558.00 

Expenses 2,900.00 

Capital Outlay ... 

42,377.00 

Treasurer 

Salary 18,181.00 

Other Salaries 14,829.00 

Expenses 1,000,00 

Tax Title Foreclosures 12,000.00 

46,010.00 

Collector 

Salary - Collector 18,806.00 

Other Salaries 14,724.00 

Expenses 4,760. 00 

38,290.00 

Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 17,180.00 

Other Salaries 14,412.00 

Expenses 590.00 

32,182.00 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 29,049.00 

Other Salaries 25,498.00 

Expenses 2,900-00 

57,447.00 

Town Counsel 

Salary - (Retainer) 15,000.00 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 11,000.00 

26,000.00 

Town Hall 

Salaries 25,646.00 

Expenses 23.675.00 

49,321.00 

Planning Board 

Salaries 

Expenses 10.^00-00 

10,100.00 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $ 389,455.00 



93 



•V ] ^SRSONS & PROPERTY 
j'.-C'i Department 

Salary - Chief $ 29,939.00 

j^ieutenant 23,037.00 

Sergeants 126,967.00 

Patrolmen (276,000 available funds) .... 183,979.00 

Traffic Supervisors 

Clerks 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance 27,546.00 

Committee be amended and the sum of $27,546 be appropriated and raised by taxation 

for the Police Department "Clerks". Motion seconded and voice vote was taken. 

This vote was challenged and standing vote then taken. Yes 249 No 140. So voted.) 
(Motion by Rocco DePasquale, to explain the adjustments to come in future line items. 

"I move that the line item "Fuel" - Maintenance of Public Buildings be decreased in 

the amount of $117,017 and that the balance of $505,683 be raised by taxation. Motion 

was seconded and so voted.) 

Vacation - Fill-in Cost 6,000.00 

Sick Leave - Fill-in Cost 10,000.00 

Miscellaneous Extra Details 10,500.00 

Paid Holidays 29,199.00 

Police Dog 1,200.00 

Specialists 2,850.00 

Night Shift Differential 10,700.00 

Expenses 39,923.00 

Capital Outlay 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski for Patrolmen above, "I move that the sum of $496,751 be 
appropriated for Police Department Salaries - Privates and that the sum of $276,000 

be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $183,979 

be raised by taxation." This motion was seconded and so voted before the line item) 501,840.00 



Constable 

Salaries 100.00 

fire 

Salary - Chief 31,845.00 

Deputy Chief 22,683.00 

Lieutenants , . 83,909.00 

Privates 220,751.00 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I nove that th? sa'i, of $496,751 be appropriated for 
Fire Department Salaries - Privates; and that tlie sum of $276,000 be raised by 
transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account, and the balance of $220,751 to be raised 
by taxation. Motion was seconded nnd so voted. 

Call Fire & Ambulance 25,842.00 

Vacation - Fill-in ..... 

Paid Holidays 27,150.00 

Expenses , 16,848.00 

Capital Outlay 

429,028.00 

Civil Defense 

Salary 1,500.00 

Expenses 3,209.00 

Capital Outlay 

4,709.00 

Dog Officer 

Salary 5,200.00 

Expenses 3,730,00 

Capital Outlay 

$ 8,930.00 



94 



Building Inspector 

Salary - Building Inspector $ 21,268.00 

Other Salaries 13,433.00 

Expenses 1,595.00 

36,296.00 

Board of Appeals 

Salary 2,500.00 

Expenses 260.00 

2,760.00 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salary 1,500.00 

Expenses 50.00 

1,550.00 

TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 985,213.00 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Town Engineer 

Salary - Town Engineer 28,856.00 

Other Salaries 56,414.00 

Expenses 2 , 990. 00 

87,260.00 

Highway 

Salary - Superintendent . . 27,123.00 

Other Salaries 262,706.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance 
Committee be amended and the sum of $262,706. be appropriated and raised by 
taxation for the Highway Department, other salaries . ")Motion was seconded and so 
voted. Yes 208 No 104, Main motion as amended so voted. 

Expenses 91,481.00 

Gasoline, Oil, Diesel Fuel & Tires 97,512.00 

Capital Outlay 

Drainage Projects 25,000.00 

Sidewalk Program 

Public Street Lights 120,000.00 

Road Machinery - Expenses 26,000,00 

Gasoline, Oil, Diesel Fuel & Tires 55,000.00 

Capital Outlay - Auto Fuel Control 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $43,232 be appropriated for 
Chapter 90; $43,232 to be raised by transfer from the Chapter 356, Acts of 1977 
Account, with the balance of zero to be raised by taxation.) This motion was 

seconded and so voted, the main motion was so voted. 

704,822.00 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Expenses 52,000.00 



95 



bnow and Ice Control 

Salaries $ 86,720.00 

Expenses 92,000.00 

Gasoline, Oil, Diesel Fuel 27,928.00 

Capital Outlay 

206,648.00 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 31,664.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance 
Committee be amended and the sum of $31,664.00 be appropriated and raised by 
taxation for the Tree Warden, salaries." This motion was seconded and so voted 
after the Dutch Elm Control vote because the Moderator neglected to see the 
Town Manager waiting to be recognized. Because of this fact and the plea of the 
Tree Warden, the Moderator did allow the reconsideration of Tree Warden salaries. 
Main motion as amended was then voted.) 

Expenses 4,590.00 

Capital Outlay 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 13,461.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 17,915.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance 
Committee be amended and the sum of $17,915.00 be appropriated and raised by 
taxation for the Gypsy Mother Control, salaries." Main motion as amended was so 
voted. ) 

Expenses 2.500.00 

72,630.00 

Cemetery 

Salary - Superintendent 19,846.00 

Other Salaries 40,205.00 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $19,046.00 be appropriated for 
the Cemetery Department, other salaries account; $9,841 to be raised by transfer 
from the Sale of Cemetery Lots account, and the balance of $9,205 to be raised by 
taxation. Second Motion: Sterling Morris, "I move that the motion made by the 
Finance Committee be amended and the sum of $50,046 be appropriated for the Cemetery 
Department, other salaries; the sum of $9,841 to be raised by transfer from the 
Sale of Cemetery Lots account and the balance of $40,205 to be raised by taxation. 
Motion seconded and so voted. The second motion being the larger amount was taken 
first and was so voted.) 

Expenses 15,300.00 

Capital Outlay 0_ 

75,351.00 

At this point the meeting was recessed for dinner to reconvene at 7:30 P.M. The meeting was called to order 
with a quorum being present at 7:55 P.M. 

Parks 

Salaries .' 3,000.00 

Expenses 2,500.01. 

Capital Outlay 

5,500.00 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS . . 1,204,211.00 

HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 24,982.00 

Other Salaries 35,879.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance 
Committee be amended and the sum of $35,879 be appropriated and raised by taxation 
for the Board of Health Department, other salaries." Motion was seconded and so voted.) 



96 



Expenses $ 2,013.00 

Hospital & Medical Care 850,00 

Solid Waste Disposal 250,000.00 

Drug Dependency Problems 

Mental Health Out Patient 13.500.00 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 327,224.00 



VETERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid 6e Benefits 

Salary - Part time Agent 2,860.00 

Other Salaries 12,687.00 

(Motion by Fruchuoso T. Carrasco, "I move to amend under Veterans Aid, other salaries 
from $12,687 to read $1,800." Motion was seconded. Main motion being the larger was 
voted first and this amendment was never voted upon. Main motion, so voted.) 

Expenses 300.00 

Assistance - Veterans 9.000.00 

TOTAL VETERANS' AID 24,847.00 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

School Maintenance & Operations 

Salary - Superintendent 24,811.00 

Salaries - Others 597,810.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance • 
Committee be amended and the sum of $645,861 be appropriated and raised by taxation 
for the School Maintenance and Operations Account, Salaries - Others." Voice vote 
was questioned and a standing vote was taken. Yes 138 No 168 Motion lost. See 
motion at end of budget for amount shown. 

Expenses 79,516.00 

Fuel Heating . (This line item was taken out of order to adjust the amount in this line 
to cover the increase of the School Budget, first item of this meeting. With the adjust- 
ment this line was amended to 505,683.00 

Roof Repair 25,000.00 

Cost of Vandalism 11,700.00 

Capital Out lav Q 

1,244,520.00 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses 9,500.00 

Capital Outlay 

9,500.00 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 68,800.00 

Electricity 50,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

118,800.00 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1,372,820.00 

LIBRARY 

Salaries & Expenses 165,195.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move that the recommendation made by the Finance 
Committee be amended and the sum of $165,195 be appropriated and raised by 
taxation for the Library Department." Motion was seconded and so voted. Voice 
vote was questioned and a standing vote was taken. Yes 149 and No 148. Motion 
so voted.) 



RECREATION 

Salary - Director 22,803.00 

Other Salaries 31,115.00 

Expenses 3.000.00 

56,918.00 



97 



BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 

Expenses $ 

Capital Outlay 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Harnden Tavern 



CONSERVATION CCMIISSION 

Personal Services 3,500.00 

Expenses 2.150.00 

5,650.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(This line item was voted as the first line item.) 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services 16,871.00 

Expenses 26,446.00 

(Motion by Wilson Belbin, "I move that the Council on Aging budget, expenses be amended 
to read $26,446 instead of $21,446." Motion was seconded and so voted. Main motion as 
amended, so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 

43,317.00 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $274,512 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - Schools to be raised by transfer from Free Cash with a balance of 
Zero to be raised by taxation." Motion was seconded and so voted. The main motion was 
then so voted.) 

General Government . 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $93,902 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - General Government to be raised by transfer from Free Cash with a 
balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. Main motion so 
voted . ) 

Water 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $397,610 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - to be raised by transfer from Available Water Surplus with a balance 
of zero to be raised by taxation. Motion seconded and so voted. Main motion then voted. 
So voted. 

Sewer •" ■ • 32,313.00 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $318,220 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - Sewer with $285,907 to be raised by transfer from Free cash with a 
balance of $32,313 to be raised by taxation. Motion seconded and so voted. Main motion 
so voted. 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski, "I move that the sum of $108,875 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - Authentication Fees and Miscellaneous Debt with $15,000 to be raised 
by transfer from Water Available Surplus and the balance of $93,875 to be raised by 

taxation. Motion seconded and so voted. Main motion as amended also voted. 93,875.00 

Revaluation 112,500.00 

Available Funds $1,066,931.00 
TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST $ 238,688.00 



98 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds $ 253,900.00 

Reserve Fund 50,000.00 

Blue Cross-Blude Shield & Group Life 407,044.00 

Local Transportation 2,000.00 

Town Report 3,000.00 

Sewer Maintenance 15,000.00 

250th Year Anniversary Connnittee 

Appraisals - E.D.P. & Inventories 7,500.00 

Training & Conference - In State 

Training & Conference - Out of State 

Veteran's Retirement 42,000.00 

Employees Retirement. (Unused Sick Leave) 28,000.00 

Incentive Pay-Police 21,900.00 

Incentive Pay-Fire & E.M.T 20,400.00 

1981 Salary Adjustments & Additional Cost 

(Motion by Arthur F. Spear, Jr., "I move that the 1981 Salary Adjustment and Additional 

cost be amended to read zero (0)." Motion seconded. Motion by Sterling Morris, "I move 

that the recommendation made by the Finance Committee be amended and the sum of $29,321 

be raised by traxation for the 1981 Salary Adjustments and Additional Cost account." 

Motion seconded. Motion #2 was taken first as it was the highter figure. Motion lost. 

Motion #1 was then so voted. Main motion as amended was voted and passed.) 

Additional Employees 

Unemployment Payments -Town (No school) 59.400.00 

Motion by John J, DeMarco, "I move to change unemployment -non school personnel from 
$134,858 to read $59,400.) Motion seconded and so voted. Main motion as amened, so voted. 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 910,144.00 



The Moderator stated that he would not be taking any reconsiderations until the money articles 
were all addressed. At this point he asked that we move on to Article 6. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of four 
Police vehicles and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the vehicles presently used by the 
Police Department: or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$24,000 for the purchase of three Police Vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the 
sale or turn-in of the vehicles presently used by the Police Department. Motion seconded and so voted. 
Main motion as amended so voted, $24,000. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000,00 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge 
of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Larz Neilson, "I move that the Town vote by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 for the 
observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange 
and have charge of said observances. Motion was seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (or a total of 
$1,500.) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Stree for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Larz Neilson, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $750.00 
each (or a total of $1,500.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws as amended, the lease of: 



99 



ARTICLE 8. (continued) 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of Providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion. 

Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion was seconded and so voted, $1,500. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquiring 
a parcel of land for Water Department purposes, and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised and to 
authorize the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent 
domain, or receive as a gift a certain parcel of land for such purposes, said land being described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Ainsworth Road, thence N21°05'33"W distant 877.40 feet by 
land of Corey to a point, thence N71°01'53"W distant 250.00 feet by said land to a point, thence N18°53'13"E 
distant 712.28 feet by other land of Corey to a point, thence S77°08'10"E distant 283.14 feet by other land of 
Corey to a point, thence S 12^51 '50"W distant 704.22 feet by said land to a point, thence N87°06'10"E distant 
198.00 feet by said land to a point, thence S00°19'07"E distant 834.24 feet by said land to the point of 
beginning, being Lot FA containing 8.3 acres all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Lot FA, Ainsworth Road, 
Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=100', January 29, 1981 Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer," a copy of which is on 
file in the office of the Town Engineer, also being land designated as Parcel 2 on Assessors' Map Rl; and to 
determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
otherwise, said funds to be provided from Water Department available surplus funds notwithstanding any 
provision or limitation of use of available funds as found in MGL Chapter 276 of 1926; or do anything in 
relation thereto. (Article by Water & Sewer Commission). Finance Committee recommends approval $400.00. 

Motion by Arthur Smith, Jr., "I move that the town vote to raise and appropriate $400.00 for the purpose of 
acquiring a parcel of land for Water Department purposes and to authorize the Board of Water & Sewer 
Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive as a gift a 
certain parcel of land for such purposes, said land being described as follows: At this point, the Moderator 
interrupted, as the motion follows the main motion further reading was not necessary. Motion was seconded and 
voted. Yes 321 No 0. Transfer from available funds. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
a water main of not less than six (6) inches but less than sixteen (16) inches in diameter for a certain 
distance in Main Street as shown on a plan on file in the office of the Town Engineer, in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 42G through to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Article by Water & Sewer Commission. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by George R. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $22,000. for the purpose of 
laying a water main of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter in accordance with 
the recommendations of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of MGL Chapter 40, 
Section 42G to 421 inclusive, for a certain distance in Main Street as shown on a plan on file in the office 
of the Town Engineer, and that said appropriation be raised by transfer from Water Department Account #1168, 
entitled "Water Distribution System". Motion was seconded and so voted, $22,000. transfer. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a Town way the 1946 Layout of Phillips Avenue, and 
to accept as a Town way the 1981 Layout of Phillips Avenue as prepared by Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer, 
as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws 
(Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways 
and specific repairs thereon) which discontinuance and layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and 
which with plans therein are hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
construction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease- 
ments and other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval 
$250, 



100 



ARTICLE 17. (continued) 



"lotion by Sterling Morris. Mr. Morris read the article as printed in warrant and added; "and to vote to 
raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $250,00 for the purpose of construction of said way and for the 
payments of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements therefor. 
Motion seconded. Second motion by Marion Woller, "I move to amend the motion by increasing the proposed amount 
from $250.00 to $880.00, which is approximately $1.00 per square foot. Motion seconded. Second motion was 
taken first as it was the larger amount. So voted. Main motion so voted as amended, unanimous. Approved 
for $880.00. 

Walter Kaminski called for a short recess to discuss balances available. Upon calling the meeting back to 
lorder the Moderator announced that he would take all motions relating to the balance of funds left and then 
'vote on them in order of taking. The amount being considered $99,649. 

Motion y^l. Walter Kaminski, "I move that the appropriation of $50,000. for the reserve Fund be increased to 
$149,649." 

Motion #2. Sterling Morris, "I move that we amend the School Maintenance and Operations, Salaries-other to 
the sum of $597,810.00 be raised by taxation." 

Motion #3. Antonio Marino, "I move that the $99,649.00 be given to the School Committee to reduce the budget 
cuts they have absorbed. , 
Motion #4. John J. DeMarco, "I move that we split the amount of $99,649.00 and add $49,824.0i5 to the Building 
Maintenance budget and $49,824.00'''to the School Department budget. 

Motion #1 voice vote, lost. 

Motion #2 voice vote questioned. Standing vote taken. Yes 174 No 153, upon the acceptance of this motion the 
main motion line item School Maintenance salaries other was reconsidered and was so voted in the amount of 



Madeline McKie rose to be recognized asking that we reconsider the Library budget by listing it broken down, 
line by line. Motion was seconded and immediately voted down by a large voice vote. 

Ann Rich tried to get the Unemployment budget to be reconsidered upon the acceptance of her motion the voice 
vote was close, a standing vote was taken. Yes 153 No 158. Motion to reconsider lost. 

Albert Fiorenza was represented by Joe Courtney who at this time tried to get reconsideration for Article 22 
of the April 18, 1981 meeting. Motion lost. 

Paul Butt rose to have his Article 23 of the April 18, 1981 meeting reconsidered and was also voted down. 

The Moderator then asked for a standing ovation for Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager and Walter H. Pierce, 
Superintendent of Schools both leaving Wilmington as of July 1, 1981. A rousing hand of applause was given 
and the Moderator then asked for a motion to adjourn. Meeting adjourned at 11:05 P.M. 

Attendance at the afternoon session was 650 voters and 52 non-voters. Attendance at the evening session was 
370 voters and 17 non-voters. 



$597,810.00. 



ARTICLES BY TAXATION 
AVAILABLE SURPLUS 
FREE CASH 
BOND ISSUE 



$13,473,667. 



466,083. 
654,321. 
22,000. 



TOTAL 



$14,616,071. 



Attest: 



Priscilla R.W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



101 



WARRAOT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 14, 1981 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington qualified to 
vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, in said Town of Wilmington on Monday, 
the fourteenth day of September, 1981 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see how much money the Town will further appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the 
salaries of several Town Officers and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to convey to the care, custody, management 
and control of the Conservation Commission, as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws and amendments thereto, a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 84 on Assessors' 
Map 9 containing approximately 10,000 square feet; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Planning 
Board and Conservation Commission. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying a 
water main of not less than six (6) inches but less than sixteen (16) inches in diameter in Lee Street from 
Glen Road to Garden Avenue as shown on a plan on file in the office of the Town Engineer, in accordance with 
the recommendations of the Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 42G through to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and further, to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners and/or the Selectmen to purchase or take by eminent domain, or 
accept as a gift utility easements to effect the purpose of this article; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Water and Sewer Commission. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend Warrant Article 31 passed at the Annual Town Meeting held 
on April 26, 1980 authorizing the Board of Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of Town-owned land to Mr. Dennis 
Sullivan thereby amending the description appearing in the aforesaid Warrant Article to read as follows: 

A certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 15 on Assessors' Map 19, bounded and described as follows: 

Northerly by Aldrich Road, 130 feet; 
Westerly by Mozart Avenue, 160 feet; 
Southerly by Lot 420, 66.6 feet; 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot and Land Court Case No. 22877 (formerly Lots 89-91) by two distances 
measuring respectively, 5.00 feet and 106.00 feet. 

Being Lots 83-88 inclusive, containing 12,361 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Home Park, 
Plan No. 3., Wilmington, Massachusetts, owned by J.W. Wilburn, Scale 60 feet equals 1 inch, Jan. 1, 1903." 

Reserving unto themselves and the Town of Wilmington for roadway purposes the following described area: 

Northerly by Aldrich Road, 130 feet; 
Westerly by Mozart Avenue, 46 feet; 

Southeasterly by a curve of 25 feet radius 50 feet; through Lot 84 

Southerly through Lots 85-88, 87 feet; 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot - Land Court; 5 feet 

Case No. 22877 (formerly Lots 89-91) 

containing 1,010 square feet, and 

Reserving unto themselves and the Town of Wilmington for roadway sloping purposes the following described area: 

Northerly through Lots 85-88, 87 feet; 

Northwesterly by a curve of 25 feet radius 50 feet; through Lot 84 
Westerly by Mozart Avenue, 17 feet; 

Southeasterly by a curve of 25 feet radius, 50 feet; through Lot 84 



102 



ARTICLE 4. (continued) 



Southerly through Lots 85-88; 79 feet 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot - Land Court 15 feet; 

Case No. 22877 (formerly Lots 89-91) 

containing 1,848 square feet; or do anything in relation thereto. (Article by Petition.) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington" by adding under Chapter 5 a new Section 37 entitled "General Wetlands By-Law", as follows: 

GENERAL WETLANDS BY-LAW 



Section 1: Application 

The purpose of the By-law is to protect the wetlands of the Town of Wilmington by controlling activities 
deemed to have a significant effect upon wetland values, including but not limited to the following: public 
or private water supply, groundwater, flood control, erosion control, storm damage prevention, water pollution, 
fisheries, wildlife, recreation and aesthetics (collectively, the "interests protected by this by-law"). 

No person shall remove, fill, dredge, alter or build upon or within one hundred feet or any bank, fresh 
water wetland, meadow, bog, swamp or upon or within one hundred feet of any estuary, creek, river, stream, 
pond or lake, or upon or within one hundred feet of any land under said waters or upon or within one hundred 
feet of any land subject to flooding or innudation, or within one hundred feet of the 100-year storm line, 
other than in the course of maintaining, repairing or replacing but not substantially changing or enlarging, 
an existing and lawfully located structure or facility used in the service of the public and used to provide 
electric, gas, water, telephone, telegraph and other tele-communication services, without filing written 
application for a permit so to remove, fill, dredge, alter or build upon, including such plans as may be 
necessary to describe such prposed activity and its effect on the environment, and receiving and complying with 
a permit issued pursuant to this By-law. 

The provisions of this section shall not apply to work performed for normal maintenance or improvement of 
land in agricultural use. 

Such application may be identical in form to a Notice of Intention filed pursuant to Mass, Gen, Laws ch. 
131, S.40, shall be sent by certified mail to the Wilmington Conservation Commission (the "Commission"), and 
must be filed concurrently with or after applications for other variances and approvals required by the Zoning 
By-law, the Subdivision Control Law or any other by-law or regulation have been obtained. The Commission shall 
set a filing fee by regulation. Copies of the application shall be sent at the time, by certified mail, to 
the Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, Town Engineer, Board of Health and the Building Inspector, Upon 
written request of any person, the Commission shall, within twenty-one days, make a written determination as 
to whether this by-law is applicable to any land or work thereon. When the person requesting a determination 
is other than the owner, notice of the determination shall be sent to the owner as well as to the requesting 
person. 

Section 2: Hearing 

The Commission shall hold a public hearing on the application within twenty-one days of its receipt. 
Notice of the time and place of the hearing shall be given by the Commission at the expense of the applicant, 
not less than five days prior to the hearing, by publication in a newspaper of general circulation of 
Wilmington and by mailing a notice to the applicant, the Board of Health, Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, 
Town Engineer, Building Inspector and to such other persons as the Commission may by regulation determine. 
The Commission, its agents, officers, employees may enter upon privately owned land for the purpose of 
performing their duties under this by-law. 

Section 2.1: Permit and Conditions 

If, after the public hearing, the Commission determines that the area which is the subject of the 
application is significant to the interest protected by this By-law, the Commission shall, within twenty-one 
days of such hearing issue or deny a permit for the work requested. If it issues a permit after making such 
determination, the Commission shall impose such conditions as it determines are necessary or desirable for 
protection of those interests, and all work shall be done in accordance with those conditions. If the 
Commission determines that the area which is the subject of the application is not significant to the interests 
protected by this By-law, or that the proposed activity does not require the imposition of conditions, it shall 
issue a permit without conditions within twenty-one days of the public hearing. Permits shall expire one year 

103 



I 



ARTICLE 5, (continued) 



from the date of issuance, unless renewed prior to expiration, and all work shall be completed prior to 
expiration. 

Section 2.2: Relationship to Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 131, S. 40 

The Commission shall not impose additional or more stringent conditions pursuant to Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 
131, s. 40 than it imposes pursuant to this By-law, nor shall it require a Notice of Intention pursuant to 
s. 40 to provide materials or data in addition to those required pursuant to this By-law. 

Section 3. Emergency Projects 

This By-law shall not apply to any emergency project as defined in Mass. Gen. Laws. Ch.l31, s.40. 

Section 4. Pre-Acquisition Violation 

Any person who purchases, inherits or otherwise acquires real estate upon which work has been done in 
violation of the provisions of this By-law or in violation of any permit issued pursuant to this By-law shall 
forthwith comply with any such order or restore such land to its condition prior to any such violation; pro- 
vided, however, that no action, civil or criminal, shall be brought against such person unl ess commenced 
within three years following the date of acquisition of the real estate by such person. 

Section 5. After due notice and public hearing, the Commission may promulgate rules and regulations to 
effectuate the purposes of this By-law. Failure by the Commission to promulgate such rules and regulations 
or a legal declaration of their invalidity by a court of law shall not act to suspend or invalidate the 
effect of this By-law. 

Section 6: Burden of Proof 

The applicant shall have the burden of proving by a preponderance of the credible evidence that the work 
proposed in the application will not harm the interests protected by this By-law. Failure to provide adequate 
evidence to the Commission supporting a determination that the proposed work will not harm the interests 
protected by this By-law shall be sufficient cause for the Commission to deny a permit or grant a permit with 
conditions, or, in the Commission's discretion, to continue the hearing to another date to enable the applicant 
or others to present additional evidence. 

Section 7: Definitions 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and implementation of this Bv-law. 
Section 7,1 The term "person" shall include any individual, group of individuals, association, partner- 
ship, corporation, company, business organization, trust, estate, the Commonwealth or political sub- 
division thereof to the extent subject to town by-laws, administrative agencies, public or guasi-public 
corporations or bodies, the Town of Wilmington, and any other legal entity, its legal representatives, 
agents or assigns. 

Section 7.2 The Term "alter" shall include, without limitation, the following actions when undertaken in 
area subject to this By-law: 

(a) Removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand gravel or aggregate materials of any kind; 

(b) Changing drainage characteristics, flushing characteristics, salinity distribution, sedimenta- 
tion patterns, flow patterns and flood retention characteristics; 

(c) Drainage or other disturbance of water level or water table; 

(d) Dumping, discharging or filling with any material which may degrade water quality; 

(e) Driving of piles, erection of buildings or structures of any kind; 

(f) Placing of obstructions whether or not they interfere with the flow of water; 

(g) Destruction of plant life, including cutting of trees; 

(h) Changing of water temperature, biochemical oxygen demand or other physical or chemical 
chemical characteristics of the water. 

Section 7.3 The term "banks" shall mean that part of land adjoining any body of water which confines 
the water. 

Section 7.4 Agricultural Practices 

(a) The term "land in agricultural use" shall mean any qualifying wetland within a farm which is 
qualified or eligible to be qualified under the Farmland Assessment Act, Mass. Gen. Laws ch.61A, 
ss. 1-5. 

(b) The term "qualifying wetland" shall mean only inland fresh water areas which are seasonally 
flooded basins or flats or inland fresh meadows. 

(c) The term "normal maintenance or improvement" of land in agricultural use shall mean only: 



104 



ARTICLE 5. (continued) 

1. Tilling practices customarily employed in the raising of crops; 

2. Pasturing of animals, including such fences and protective structures as may be required; 
3- Use of fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and similar materials subject to state 

and federal regulations covering their use; 
4. Constructing, grading, or restoring of field ditches, subsurface drains, grass waterways, 
culverts, access roads, and similar practices to improve drainage, prevent erosion, 
provide more effective use of rainfall, improve equipment operation and efficiency, in 
order to improve conditions for the growing of crops, 
(d) "improvement" of land in agricultural use may also include more extensive practices such as 
the building of ponds, dams structures for water control, water and sediment basins, and 
related activities, but only where a plan for such activity approved by the Conservation 
District of the Soil Conservation Service is furnished to the Conservation Commission prior to 
the commencement of work. 

All such activity shall subsequently be carried out in accord with said plan. In the 
event that the work is not carried out in accordance with the required plan, the Conservation 
Commission may place a stop order on said work and have recourse to such measures as if the 
plan were an order of conditions. 
Section 7.5 The Commission may adopt additional definitions not inconsistent with this Section 7 in its 
regulations promulgated pursuant to Section 5 of this By-law. 

Section 8. Security 

The Commission may require, as a permit condition, that the performance and observance of other 
conditions be secured by one or both of the following methods: 

(a) By a bond or deposit of money or negotiable securities in an amount determined by the 
Commission to be sufficient and payable to the Town of Wilmington; 

(b) By a conservation restriction, easement or other covenant running with the land, executed 
and properly recorded (or registered, in the case of registered land). 

Section 9. Enforcement 

Any person who violates any provision of this By-law or of any condition or a permit issued pursuant to 
It shall be punished by a fine of not more than $200. Each day or portion thereof during which a violation 
continues shall constitute a separate offense; if more than one, each condition violated shall constitute a 
separate offense. This By-law may be enforced pursuant to Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 40, s.21D, by a Town police 
officer or other officer having police powers. 

Upon request of the Commission, the Board of Selectmen and Town Counsel shall tanke such legal action as 
may be necessary to enforce this By-law and permits issued pursuant to it. 

WILMINGTON'S WETLAND BY-LAW XXXVII 

FEE SCHEDULE 



RULES : 

1) Permit fees are payable at the t'me of application and are non- refundable . 

2) Permit fees shall be calculated by this department per schedule below. 

3) Town, County, State or Federal projects are exempt from fees. 

4) No fee is charged for Requests of Determination under the law or extensions of Order of 
Condition. 

5) Failure to comply with the law after official notification shall result in fees twice those 
normally assessed. 

FEES: 1) Wetlands By-law Hearing -- $25.00 

(i.e. dwelling, tennis court, swimming pool, bridge, etc.) 

2) Multiple dwelling units shall be charged $25.00 per dwelling unit. 

3) Commercial and industrial projects: $25.00 + $5.00 per $10,000 of established general 
construction cost over $100,000. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Conservation Commission. 



105 



Special Town Meeting - September 14, 1981 (continued) 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said town this 25th day of August, A.D. 1981. 

Board of Selectmen • - • 

A. John Imbimbo, Chairman 
; qi. Rocco V. DePasquale 

Robert J. Cain 

Attest: Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, WimiNGTON. MASSACHUSETTS - SEPTEMBER 14. .1981 

On September 14, 1981 at 7:50 P.M. the Moderator, John Callan noted that with a quorum being present the 
meeting could begin. Before proceeding with the business at hand, Mr. Callan had some sad news and some glad 
news. First, sorry to see that Aldo Caira had resigned, secondly that his son Michael Caira had been appointed 
by the remaining board members to fill the vacancy until April election. The Moderator was reading the warrant 
when he was interrupted by A. John Imbimbo with the motion, I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article by number. Motion was seconded and so 
voted. 

Article 1. To see how much money .the Town will further appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the. 
salaries of several Town Officers and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available. funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. 

Motion by A. John Imbimbo, "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance 
Committte be raised by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropriated for the purposes set forth 
in Article 1." Each line item to be taken up and voted subject to amendment. 

Article 1. Line 1 - Account #960 - Approved. 230,000.00 

Line 2 - Account #600 - Approved 309,000.00 

(Line 2 caused much discussion due to the fact that the old Swain School was 
opened instead of one of the newer schools. After one hour of discussion a 
motion was made to stop debate. A two-thirds vote being needed, a standing vote 
was taken. Yes 148 No 287. Motion lost. Further discussion went on until 9:55 p.m. 
A standing vote was then taken on Line_ 2. Yes 399 No 40. The motion for the above 
line was read by John D. Brooks, Chairman of the School Committee. "In compliance 
with Chapter 71, Massachusetts General Statute, "I move that it be and hereby is the 
determination of the School Committee that the additional sum of $309,000. is the 
amount necessary for the support and operation of the public schools in the Town of 
Wilmington for the 1981-1982 fiscal year as voted unanimously by the Wilmington 
School Committee at its meeting of August 19, 1981. A breakdown of these figures is 
as follows: Principal - $29,424. Secretarial - $14,844. Teachers - $162,969. 
Specialist - $53,016, Guidance - $42,884. Utilities - $5,863. Total - $309,000. A 
motion was made by Rhonda Lutz, "Any monies allocated to the School Deptartment that 
will be used for the Swain School, be allocated to be used toward the opening and 
running of the Glen Road School." This amendment was declared illegal as no mention 
was made in the warrant of any such appropriation, and the town meeting floor had no 



say in what the School Committee decided other than to give public opinion.) 

Line 3 - Account #700 - Approved 15,000.00 

Line 4 - Account #900 - Approved 35,000.00 

Line 5 - Account #985 - (Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the sum of -50,000.00 



($50,000. be reducted from Account #985, Unemployment Payments, to fund the $15,000. 

appropriation by transfer to Account #700, Maintenance of Public Buildings, Other 

and that the $35,000. appropriation by transfer to Account #900, Reserve Fund. 

At this point, Mr. Belbin asked to submit a motion. The Moderator and Town Counsel 

declared the motion illegal, and the main motion was voted as originally made and 

seconded. The vote was yes by voice vote. The above motion, unless otherwide stated 

were voted by voice vote and so declared by the Moderator as so voted.) The Moderator 

now stated he would entertain the motion by Mr. Belbin, stating that he was still uncertain 



106 



Special Town Meeting - (continued) 

as to its legality. Motion by Mr. Belbin, "I move that a vote be taken to transfer the 
sum of $6,000. from account #985 Unemployment Compensation Account, to the Council on 
Aging Account," The motion vas seconded and so voted by a voice vote. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to convey to the care, custody, management 
and control of the Conservation Commission, as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws and amendments thereto, a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 84 on Assessors' 
Map 9 containing approximately 10,000 square feet; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Article by Planning Board and Conservation Commission. 

Motion by John DeRoy, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to convey to the care, custody, 
management and control of the Conservation Commission, as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Mass- 
achusetts General Laws and amendments thereto, a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 84 on 
Assessors' Map 9 containing approximately 10,000 square feet." Two-thirds vote required. A voice vote was 
taken and the Moderator declared the vote, unanimously. Motion so voted. 

At this point Mr. John Brooks of the School Committee announced that at a meeting called for September 16th, 
the committee would discuss and investigate the Swain School conditions. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying a 
water main of not less than six (6) inches but less than sixteen (16) inches in diameter in Lee Street from 
Glen Road to Garden Avenue as shown on a plan on file in the office of the Town Engineer, in accordance with 
the recommendations of the Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 42G through to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and further, to see i€ . 
Town will vote to authorize the Water & Sewer Commissioners and/or the Selectmen to purchase or take by 
eminent domain, or accept as a gift utility easements to affect the purpose of this article; or do anythiug 
relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article by Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

Motion by Arthur Smith, "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $22,000.00 for the purpose of 
laying a water main of not less than six (6) inches by less than sixteen (16) inches in diameter in Lee 
Street from Glen Road to Garden Avenue, an approximate distance of 650 feet, as shown on a plan on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk, in accordance with the recommendations of the Water & Sewer Commissioners 
acting under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40 Section 42G through 421 inclusive, and that said 
appropriation be raised by transfer from' the Water Department Account #1168, entitled "Water Distribution 
System", and to effect the purpose of this article, that the Town vote to authorize the Water & Sewer 
Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain or receive as a gift an easement from 
Glen Road to the center line of Garden Avenue for utilities, including, but not limited to, water, sewer and 
drains." Two-thirds vote needed. Motion seconded. A voice vote was taken and the Moderator declared the 
to be unanimously. So voted. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend Warrant Article 31 passed at the Annual Town Meeting held 
April 26, 1980 authorizing the Board of Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of Town-owned land to Mr. Dennis 
Sullivan thereby amending the description appearing in the aforesaid Warrant Article to read as follows: 

A certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 15 on Assessors' Map 19, bounded and described as 
follows : 

Northerly by Aldrich Road, 130 feet; 
Westerly by Mozard Avenue, 160 feet; 
Southerly by Lot 420, 66.6 feet; 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot and Land Court Case No. 22877 (formerly Lots 89-91) 

by two distances measuring respectively, 5.00 feet and 106.00 feet. 
Being Lots 83-88 inclusive, containing 12,361 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Home Park, 
Plan No. 3., Wilmington, Massachusetts, owned by J.W. Wilbur, Scale 60 feet f-.uals 1 inch, January 1,1903." 

Reserving unto themselves and the Town of Wilmington for roadway purposes the rollowing described area: 
Northerly by Aldrich Road, 130 feet; 
Westerly by Mozart Avenue, 46 feet; 

Southeasterly by a curve of 25 feet radius 50 feet; through Lot 84 
Southerly through Lots 85-88, 87 feet 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot - Land Court 5 feet, Case No. 22877 (formerly lot* 89-91) 



107 



Article 4 - Special Town Meeting (continued) 



containing 1,010 square feet, and 
Reserving unto themselves and the Town of Wilmington for roadway sloping purposes the following described 
area : 



Northerly through Lots 85-88; 87 feet 
Northwesterly by a curve of 25 feet radius; 50 feet 
through Lot 84 

Westerly by Mozart Avenue; 17 feet 

Southeasterly by a curve of 25 feet radius; 50 feet 

through Lot 84 

Southerly through Lots 85-88; 79 feet 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot - Land Court; 15 feet 

Case No. 22877 (Formerly Lots 89-91) 

containing 1,848 square feet; or do anything in relation thereto. 



Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Leo Campbell, to read che same as the main article. Motion was seconded and voice vote was taken. 
Vote declared unanimously by the Moderator. So voted. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 

Wilmington" by adding under Chapter 5 a new Section 37 entitled "General Wetlands By-Law", as follows: 

Finance Committee recommends that this article be tabled until it has been reviewed by the By-Law Study 
Study Committee. Planning Board recommends disapproval of this article. 

Motion by Chester Bruce, motion is as the main motion with the Fee Schedule being deleted. Motion was 
seconded and after much discussion an amendment was made by Joseph Courtney. "I move that the "General 
Wetlands By-Law be returned to the Board of Selectmen for referral to the By-Law Study Committee for further 
study. Mr. Courtneys amendment needed a majority vote. Standing vote was taken. Yes 137 No 74. The main 
motion as amended to refer to Selectmen and By-Law Committee was voted by voice vote. The Moderator declared 
the amended article so voted. 

A motion was made to adjourn the meeting with no further business to come before it. Motion was seconded 
and meeting was adjourned at 11:20 p.m. 

There were 574 registered voters attending and 31 non-voters. 



By Taxation 
By Transfer 



$539,000. 
$ 78,000 



Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



108 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
July 1, 1980 through June 30, 1981 

Balance as of July 1, 1980 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/80 to 6/30/81 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/80 to 6/30/81 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



Tax Collections: 

Personal Property, Levy 1977 348. 8A 

1978 272.00 

1979 387.10 

1980 1,153.08 

1981 455,526.70 

1982 8.326.44 
Real Estate, Levy 1976 6.40 

1977 13.68 

1978 16.00 

1979 106,809.05 

1980 102,410.12 

1981 11,489,161.66 

1982 1,322.21 

Betterments Added to Taxes; 

Water Assessments, Levy 1979 651.30 

1980 174.74 

1981 10,607.21 
Sureet Assessments, Levy 1979 415.86 

1980 325.56 

1981 8,562.00 
Sewer Assessments, Levy 1981 2,112.41 

Water Liens Added To Taxes: 

Levy 19 79 1,674.49 

1980 756.75 

1981 45,615.71 

Sewer Liens Added To Taxes: 

Levy 1981 

Tax Titles & Possessions: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 27,744.72 

Tax Possessions 33,514.43 

Pro-Forma Taxes 106.15 

Assessments Paid in Advance: 

Water 7,300.50 

Street 1,218.68 

Unapportioned Water Betterments paid in full 292.95 

Unapportioned Street Betterments paid in full 5, 772 . 19 



1,132,736.75 
84,630,911.21 
85,763,647.96 
84,798,246.17 
965,401.79 



466,014.16 



11,699,739.12 



22,849.08 

48,046.95 
3,518.43 

61,365.30 

14.584.32 12,316,117.36 



109 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



■-•'^'^■"t Term Loans: 
Temporary Loans, Antic. 
L ong Term Loans: 

'-valuation Bonds 



Federal Aid: 



of Revenue 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Schools : 

Public Law //85-864 
Public Law //874 
Public Law #94-482 (Title IV) 
Handicapped Children (Title VI) 
Reading Skills 
Head Start 
Sewer Grants 
C.E.T.A. Funds 
State Aid: 

Highway Reconstruction & Maintenance 
Libraries 

Water Treatment Plant Reimbursement 
Sewer Construction Reimbursement 
State-Project Intercede 



a chool Lunch Program: 

State Reimbursements 

Program Receipts 
High School Athletic Association 
Recreation Dedicated Accounts 
Outside Details Account 
Tax Title Recordings 



6,225.00 
22,258.95 
13,737.00 
111,234.00 
93,381.00 
19,532.84 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



173,665.72 
289,753.93 



RESTRICTED ACCOUNTS 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
W ater Department; 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Industrial Way Pumping Station 

Water Available Surplus 
Sewer Use (Septage Disposal) 
Veterans Aid Recoveries 

Betterment of Veterans Plot-Wildwood Cemetery, Interest 
Carter Lecture Fund, Reimbursements 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Perpetual Care Funds 

Asbestos Claim Reimbursements Restricted for 

Glen Road School 
Sale of Town Owned Lands 
Accrued Interest-Trust Funds 
Forgery Recoveries 
Appropriation Refunds 
Surplus Revenue (Refunds) 
Tailings Account 



885,322.01 
9,298.96 
1,006.41 
12,775.59 
25,127.73 
214.12 



Short Term Investments 
E mployee Deductions: 
Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
Retirement System 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



1,863,498.17 
516,323.57 
533,457.88 



1,800,000.00 
185,000.00 



266,368.79 
806,600.00 
350.40 

86,464.00 
8,828.00 
700,000.00 
596,528.00 

11,525.00 



463,419.65 
13,420.95 
22,300.59 
95,244.41 
258.72 



11,311.55 



933,744.82 
2,500.00 
4,084.30 
123.13 
568.15 
10,930.00 
12,030.00 
13,432.85 

3,990.00 
23,208.00 
140.00 
61,541.53 
329.35 
1,274.34 



1,985,000.00 



2,476,664.19 



594,644.32 



1,079,208.02 



57,799,000.00 



110 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



Employee Deductions: ( cont . ) 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
Group Insurance 
Washington National Insurance 
Group Insurance Dividend 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 
U.S. Savings Bonds 
Union Dues 

Court Ordered Deductions 
Fish & Game Licenses for the Commonwealth 
County Dog Licenses, due the County 
Lunch Food Tax, due the State 
Registry Releases, due the State 
Library Memorial Gift/Lanni, Jr. 



(continued) 



141,236.83 
2,139.61 
5,665.54 
165.00 
131,072.07 
782,015.00 
6,074.50 
65,782.30 
1,900.00 
8,537.50 
4,646.75 
761.49 
454.00 
262.00 



4,049,330.47 



14,661.74 



4,063,992.21 



Schools, State Reimbursements 
Real Estate Abatements, State 

Veterans 

Elderly 
Loss of Taxes, State 
Lottery Funds, State 
Local Aid Funds, State 
Highway Fund, Chapter 497 
School Building Assistance, State 
Veterans Benefits Reimbursements 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 

Prior Years 

Current Levy 
Farm Animal Excise Taxes 
Ambulance Account 
Sewer Rates 
Liquor Licenses 
Interests & Costs: 

Short Term Investments 

Tax Collections 

Water Demands 

Tax Titles Interest & Costs 

General Fund Investments 

Sewer Bans 
Municipal Receipts: 

Selectmen 

Tax Collector 

Town Clerk 

Planning Board 
Police Department 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 

Wire Permits 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Certification Fees 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Engineering Department 
Cemetery Department 
Drainlayers Permits 
Advertising Fees 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

2,138,556.00 

8,925.00 
42,757.27 
787.50 
135,179.00 
261,781.00 
67,446.00 
158,594.78 
7,322.96 



353,982.68 
270,214.20 



412,949.17 
49,282.53 
8,769.43 
8,697.94 
56,041.19 
45,158.56 

1,304.00 
13,421.00 
8,952.28 
1.725.00 



22,676.90 
8,458.00 
1,576.50 
1,442.00 
805.00 



2,821,349.51 



624,196.88 
140.25 
9,695.00 
98,411.40 
7,300.00 



580,898.82 



25,402.28 
3,971.00 



34,958.40 
809.00 
966.00 

10,648.00 
48.00 
287.50 



111 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Health & Sanitation: 

Board of Health 

Public Health Nurse 

Sale of Dogs 
Dog License, Reimbursements 
Miscellaneous 

N.E.Tel. & Tel. Commissions 
Library Receipts 
Conservation Commission 

Insurance & Workmen's Comp. Reimbursements 
Witness Fee 
Court Fines 

Sale of Obsolete Equipment 
Reimbursement Town-owned Land 



(continued) 



8,509.28 
63.00 
267.00 



8,839.28 
2,316.39 
620.03 
565.54 
3,333.48 
450.00 
17,270.39 
80.00 
62,680.96 
124.42 
922.58 



4,316.285.11 



TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1980 TO JUNE 30, 1981 



$84.630,911.21 



Balance on hand July 1, 1980 
Received 7/1/80 through 6/30/81 
Balance on hand June 30, 1981 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING 
JULY 1. 1980 TO JUNE 30, 1981 



Federal Grants 



$573,656.00 



Interest Received 
On Investments 



$30,654.46 



Expended 



$590,251.10 



Balance 
On Hand 

$58,272.94 



$72,332.30 



Expenditures : 

Police Salaries $290,251.10 "I certify that this is a true extract 

Fire Salaries $300,000.00 of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 

$590,251.10 Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



112 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $485,000 
Land Acq. Town Forest (1975) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $169,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $275,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $264,000 
Sewerage System & Treatment Facility 

G/L 44, Sec. 7, $1,865,000 
Urban Renewal Bonds 

G/L 212b, Sec. 20, $200,000 
Street Construction Bonds (1979) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $95,000 
Property Revaluation Bonds (1981) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $185,000 



Balances 
7/1/80 



185,000 
90,000 
140,000 
155,000 
1,665,000 
40,000 
95,550 

2,370,550 



Added 
1980/81 



185.000 
185,000 



Paid-Off 
1980/81 



25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
100,000 
20,000 
19,550 

209,550 



Balances 
6/30/81 



160,000 

75,000 

125,000 

140,000 

1,565,000 

20,000 

76,000 

185,000 
2,346,000 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 



North Intermediate School 



Acts 645/48, $1,050,000 


55,000 




55,000 





Woburn Street School 










Acts 645/48, $597,000 


112,000 




30,000 


82,000 


Woburn Street School Addition 










Acts 645/48, $660,000 


210,000 




30,000 


180,000 


West Intermediate School 










Acts 645/48, $1,445,000 


345,000 




70,000 


275,000 


Shawsheen Ave. School 










Acts 645/48, $1,674,720 


440,000 




110,000 


330,000 


Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 










Acts 645/48, $100,000 


25,000 




5,000 


20,000 


Water Main Bonds, New Well Field & Mains 










Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529 


30,000 




30,000 





Salem Street Well Field & Mains 










Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $320,000 


100,000 




20,000 


80,000 


Improvements to System, N.E. Sector Town 










Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $550,000 


325,000 




35,000 


290,000 


Water Treatment Plant (1979/80) 










•Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $2,735,000 


2,735,000 




160,000 


2,575,000 




4,377,000 




545,000 


3.832,000 


COMBINED TOTALS 


6.747,550 


185,000 


754,550 


6.178.000 



LOANS AUTHORIZED AND UNISSUED 

Sewer Mains. Article #12, Town Meeting 6/23/75 $ 5,135,000 

Water Treatment Plant, Article //I, Special Town Meeting 9/24/79 600,000 
Water Treatment Plant, Article #12, Town Meeting 3/11/78 15,000 

Property Revaluation Bonds, Article //4, Town Meeting 12/8/80 15,000 

$ 5,765,000 



113 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 



Refunds; 

Personal Property Taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Estimated Receipts 

Ambulance Account 

Surplus Revenue 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Liens 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Registry Releases 
Tax Titles 
Legal Settlements 

Temporary Loans, Anticipation of Revenue 
Assessments - State & County; 

State Recreation 

M.D.C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Air Pollution Control 
Planning Council 
M.B.T.A. 
State Audit 

Ipswich River Watershed 
County Tax 
County Retirement 
Outside Details: 
Police 
Fire 

Maintenance 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Employee Deductions; 

Withholding Taxes, Federal 

Withholding Taxes, State 

Retirement 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance 

U.S. Savings Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 
Union Dues: 

Town Employees 

Police 

Fire 

Maintenance Department 

Teachers 
Court Ordered Deductions 
Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 

Fish & Game Licenses 

Lunch Food Tax 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

C.E.T.A. 

Carter Lecture Funds 
Cemetery Trust Funds 



91,039.36 
95,153.09 
2,637.00 
2,253.65 
2,648.40 
245,336.05 
23,692.97 
5.55 
351,384,35 
429.185.00 



4,210.00 
4,323.19 
3,276.00 
4,562.00 
50.725.43 



20.13 
17,045.18 
15,824.90 
663.17 
130.00 
1,110.50 

390.02 
171.79 
2,534.39 



462,766.07 
780,569.35 

81,177.37 
2,064.89 

10,290.08 
1.822.29 

1,876,354.95 
520,082.10 
529,366.69 
2,139.59 
5,790.59 
5,770.00 
154,818.33 
110,995.47 
790,575.50 



67,096.62 
1,950.00 

5,690.65 
8,722.75 
749.95 
19.381.70 
444,578.21 
10,554.65 
635.00 
560.72 
10,670.00 



34,793.88 



3,096.20 
446.00 
293.72 
12,148.00 
500,000.00 



1,243,335.42 



95,354.63 



4,064,939.84 



501,543.63 



114 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
(continued) > 

Federal Grants and Aid - School: 

Public Law #864 19,307.46 
Public Law #874 7,342.37 
Handicapped Children, Title IV 114,626.14 
Reading Skills, Title I 81,301.77 
Head Start 17,427.50 

Learning Skills, Title IVB 17,263.61 257,268.85 

Short Term Investments 57,204,000.00 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS $63,917.220.17 



lOm OF WILMINGTON 
ANALYSIS OF FEDERAL NEIGHBORHOOD REHABILITATION PROGRAM 
JULY 1, 1980 TO JUNE 30, 1981 



FEDERAL BUDGET FOR PROGRAM #B-80-DS-25-0052 $245,000.00 



BALANCE ON HAND 
FEDERAL GRANTS EXPENDITURES 6/30/81 

I Letters of Credit from Old Colony Bank & 

r Trust Company of Middlesex County $ 170,000.00 $ 168,814.00 $ 1,186.00 

EXPENDITURES CLASSIFIED 

Salaries & Wages 
Fringe Benefits 
Misc. Contractual Services 
Office Expenses 
Office Equipment 
Training & Conferences 
Contractors & Homeowners 



$ 25,329.00 
484.19 
2,900.85 
333.67 
1,120.40 
476.01 

138,169. 88 "I certify that this is a true extract of the 

$168,814.00 Federal Neighborhood Rehabilitation Program in 

the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



115 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1981 



ASSETS 



Cash 

Warrants Paid in Advance 
Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies 

Personal Property 



Real Estate 



Current Levies 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 



1977 
1978 
1980 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 

1981 
1981 



Personal Property in Litigation Levy, 1969 
Tax Deferral Real Estate Levy, 1981 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 



Prior Levies 
Levy 



1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 

Current Levy 1981 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes: 
Street Assessments 1978 
1980 
1981 

Water Assessments 1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 

Unapportioned Sewer Betterments 
Accounts Receivable: 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Services 

Installations 

Liens 1978 
1979 

1980 
1981 

Industrial Way Pumping Station 
Commercial & Industrial Fire Protection 
Sewer Rates 

State (x County Aid to Highways 

County Aid to Highways 

Ambulance Services 
Unprovided for Accounts: 
Tax Title Recordings 



Overlay Deficits: 
Levy 



1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 

Legal Settlements 
Temporary Loans/Anticipation of State & 
County Aid to Highways - 
Paid in i^dvance of Reimbursement 

Underestimates: 

State & County Assessments 
County Tax 1981 
Court Ordered Deductions 
Loans Authorized 
Revenue 1982 

TOTAL ASSETS 



20.52 
24.00 
18.881.05 
155.20 
54.72 
64.00 
1,098.58 
95,295.70 

4,423.46 
284,296.63 



1,649.89 
6,465.53 
8,714.42 
10,031.79 
18,529.57 
26,972.08 
39,624.70 
60,166.52 



43.33 
17.04 
422.35 
> 1.79 
13.59 
1,472.42 
960.43 



43.50 
8.47 
2,013.30 
6,747.95 



153.90 
60.50 
2,682.04 
28,018.83 
122,375.26 



1,725,158.14 
632,338.18 
3,030,000.00 
625.00 



18,925.57 



96,668.20 



288,720.09 
462.00 
1,420.83 



172,154.50 
81,080.11 

110,582.04 
89,888.76 



2,930.95 
30,374.97 



135,179.13 
2,460.14 
32.60 



8,813.22 
10,997.70 
256.00 
12,319. 32 
202,899.96 
13,471.40 
17,777.50 

21.50 



153,290.53 
12,148.00 



4.427.92 



5,388,121.32 



659,431.30 
200,470.80 



33,305.92 



404,206.97 



169,887.95 



7,574.62 
75.00 
5,787,000.00 
13.464.018.35 

$26,114,092.23 



116 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1981 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Warrants Payable 

Estimated Sewer Betterments 

Paid in Advance 
Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Sewer Department 
Registry Releases 
State & County Assessments: 

State Recreation 

M.D.C. Sewer 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 
M.B.T.A. 

Ipswich River Water Shed Dist. 
Sale of Town-owned Land 
Sale of Real Estate 
Temporary Loans Antic. Bond Issues 
Agency Accounts : 

Retirement System Deductions 

Group Insurance Deductions 

Washington National Ins. Ded. 

U.S. Savings Bonds Deductions 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Union Dues 

County Dog Licenses 

Fish & Game Licenses 

State Food Tax 
Tailings 

Revolving Accounts: 



1981 
1981 
1981 

1981 



Memorial Gift for Arnold Lanni, Jr. 
Library Memorial Account 
Containment of Asbestos in Schools 

Fire Insurance Reim. /Available for Appropriation (Glen Rd. School) 

(Boutwell School) 

Highway & Transit Dev. Assistance 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Betterment of Veterans Plot 
Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicles Excise 

Special Assessments 

Tax Title & Possessions 

Departmental 

Water 

Sewer 

State & County Aid to Highways 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Special Tax Revenue 
Outside Details 

Appropriation Balances Reserved for Encumberances 1982 
Balances Reserved for Capital Projects 1981 
Special Revenue Accounts Reserved for Expenditure 1982 
Appropriation Balances Reserved for Expenditure 

Prior Years 
Loans Authorized & Unissued 
Appropriation Control 1982 
Water Available Surplus 
Surplus Revenue 



1,230.78 
5,027.52 
565.53 
1,463.95 
38.16 



112,565.83 
533.22 
1,112.32 
503.69 
7,265,35 
36,260.26 
24.10 
2,829,16 
455.50 
56.66 



Recreation Dedicated Accounts 


2,834 


68 


School Lunch 


14,433 


23 


High School Athletic Account 


7,909 


70 


State & Federal Grants & Aids: 






State Aid to Libraries 


8,828 


00 


Headstart 1981 


19,499 


00 


1980 


19 


34 


P.L. 85-864 NDEA 


69,475 


67 


P.L. 874 


96,816 


73 


Title II Library Learning Resources 


11,343 


00 


Title I Reading Skills 


25 


00 


Title IVB Improv'ed Ancillary Services 


6,017 


12 


Project Intercede 


11,363 


60 


P.L. 94-482 Micro Computers in Business Dept. 


184 


43 


Law Collection Development Project 


4 


87 


Inter library Loan Improvement Project 


30 


59 


Arts & Humanities 


100 


00 


Title IVB Learning Resources 


4 


99 



33,796.00 
12,754.13 



253,234.61 
33,305.92 
200,470.80 
17,777.50 
157,738.79 
12,319. 32 
216,371.36 
625.00 
462.00 



1,392,094.53 

352.50 
504.00 
40,818.10 
14.00 



8,325.94 
14,890.00 
2,800.00 
1,300,000.00 



161,606.09 
8,610.00 



248,889.95 
262.00 
75.69 
13,432.85 

46,550.13 
43,232.00 

1,360.00 
10,930.80 

2,285.83 



892,305.30 

96.45 
586,293.20 
1,028,087.70 
16,612.19 

230,155.89 
4,487,000.00 
14,594,071.00 
534,536.93 
447,899.16 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



117 



$26,114,092.23 



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